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Old 05-04-2013, 10:08 PM   #81
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I am curious if the person who made this post considers themself to be in the category the title implies.



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Either that, or just too much early retirement time on his hands



Close enough. However, I’m not yet retired and I’m 69 years old. I never really thought about retiring (until recently), let alone retiring early. Actually, I’m pretty sure that my early retirement boat has sailed, simply vanished —probably a Bermuda Triangle-type thing. I mean, there is no trace of that sucker. (Hmmn, is that some sort of debris down there—kinda’ of reddish looking and in the shape of a duck)? When I was growing up, I don’t think “early retirement” as used now really existed—although if the term did exist it might have been used to mean somebody stopped working because they were injured and could no longer work. So, maybe I assumed that people were just supposed to work until they were 62 (or, what ever was considered a reasonable age to retire).

In college, I changed my major three times. It took me 5 ½ years to graduate. (I was in no hurry, anyway). I figured college would be a lot better than real life (got that one right). I also figured that I should find something that I liked doing (and maybe even understand) and that I better be really good at it if I planned on making a living. So far, so good.

I like my job —almost always have--and I get paid a fair amount of money, so I keep on coming back (it’s either that, or dropping by your house). Plus, it’s a 20 minute drive to work (kind of a pleasant 20 minutes). I mainly work from about 11 AM to 3PM plus about an hour a day of work when I return home.

I don’t know if I actually could retire as per finances (I think I probably could, but I haven’t seriously tallied up my money in a couple of years and I don’t know what I spend). I have never thought about the “ living below my means” concept. Luckily, I don’t have expensive tastes, no credit card debt or any other kind of debt. To quote W2R: “...I like what I have.”



Is this a great thread or what?
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Old 05-05-2013, 02:16 PM   #82
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In my particular field, if you are not serious before the age of 12 you have no chance. In academia (as in so many fields) the paperwork has grown exponentially, whereas the number of full-time faculty has declined. Further, as one advances, the administrative tasks take take over, while the part-time folks get to the do the teaching. Also, my career has taken so much of my time, that I want to redress that balance. Finally, my job is in an area of the country I would never want to visit, much less spend a few decades. So I would like to retire to finally get to the life and work I intended to have in the first place.
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:39 PM   #83
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In my particular field, if you are not serious before the age of 12 you have no chance.
I'm curious about this statement. I could see two careers where having to be so proficient and "serious" at such a young age would be required: musical prodigy, and certain sports. But you mentioned academia?

Could you elaborate?
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:57 PM   #84
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The OP question is a good one. I've been doing what I'm doing for 35 years and will be ready to move on sometime in the next few years, when the time is right, but I assume I'll be doing something after FIRE, whether part-time or volunteer. DW is hanging on to a high-paying job on the assumption she can FIRE in two years. She will be bored in 6 months after FIRE but wants to move to the West Coast next to the mini-me's.
We're not wealthy but are in the position where, after down-sizing, reducing spending and no longer contributing to retirement and college tuition, we don't need to work. I do think continuing to contribute to society, even if it is not work in the traditional sense, is important. I don't see FIRE as not working, other than in the narrow sense.
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:59 PM   #85
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I, too, am curious. I thought of chess but "academia" doesn't fit. Diving and gymnastics are the other two that came to mind. But, I don't imagine there's a lot of paperwork in those two areas.

The area that you wouldn't even want to visit? Easy, it has to be Texas.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:12 PM   #86
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Another reason I am looking to run from the day job is the lack of balance in my life. Work eats an inordinate amount of time, leaving me to live my life in the crumbs that are left. I had a lot of stuff to do this weekend. Yesterday I ran crazy errands and spent hours digging the garden and then rediging to incorporate compost. Today I made a 10 gallon batch of beer, cut and split a quarter cord of wood and did about a third of the planting I need to get done. I am exhausted and didn't get it all done, but that is all the time I have, cause tomorrow it is back to the grind.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:17 PM   #87
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Another reason I am looking to run from the day job is the lack of balance in my life. Work eats an inordinate amount of time, leaving me to live my life in the crumbs that are left. I had a lot of stuff to do this weekend. Yesterday I ran crazy errands and spent hours digging the garden and then rediging to incorporate compost. Today I made a 10 gallon batch of beer, cut and split a quarter cord of wood and did about a third of the planting I need to get done. I am exhausted and didn't get it all done, but that is all the time I have, cause tomorrow it is back to the grind.
Those sound like very good reasons to move on (not run) from your day job to me.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:51 PM   #88
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I'm curious about this statement. I could see two careers where having to be so proficient and "serious" at such a young age would be required: musical prodigy, and certain sports. But you mentioned academia?

Could you elaborate?
Hope I don't "out" myself: I'm a music professor.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:02 PM   #89
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Hope I don't "out" myself: I'm a music professor.

Thank you. Trying to figure out stuff like this keeps me up at night.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:20 PM   #90
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Originally Posted by brewer12345
Another reason I am looking to run from the day job is the lack of balance in my life. Work eats an inordinate amount of time, leaving me to live my life in the crumbs that are left. I had a lot of stuff to do this weekend. Yesterday I ran crazy errands and spent hours digging the garden and then rediging to incorporate compost. Today I made a 10 gallon batch of beer, cut and split a quarter cord of wood and did about a third of the planting I need to get done. I am exhausted and didn't get it all done, but that is all the time I have, cause tomorrow it is back to the grind.


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Those sound like very good reasons to move on (not run) from your day job to me.

I don't think Brewer has any intention of running from his day job to you.

And, Brewer, geez, that sounds like quite a productive weekend. Quite physical--rushing around, digging,digging again, splitting and planting.. Maybe it's a good thing you didn't have the time to finish all the planting on the weekend. You did mention you were exhausted. I understand your looking forward to leaving you job so you will have more time to do what you enjoy--and it sounds as if that will happen sooner than later. Hang in there.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:28 PM   #91
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Thank you. Trying to figure out stuff like this keeps me up at night.
Redduck, I am glad you asked cuz I was wondering about the same thing! The only thing I could think of was music prodigies myself, so I guess I was right. I can sleep well tonight too.
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:08 AM   #92
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Hope I don't "out" myself: I'm a music professor.
Thanks for clarifying! Music was my first guess, but "academia" didn't figure into it, although it makes sense.

If you don't mind delving a little deeper...most of the musical prodigies I've heard about seem to revolve around two instruments, piano and violin. In your experience, are those two instruments the most prominent, or are there others?

Thanks!
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:55 AM   #93
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Another reason I am looking to run from the day job is the lack of balance in my life. Work eats an inordinate amount of time, leaving me to live my life in the crumbs that are left. I had a lot of stuff to do this weekend. Yesterday I ran crazy errands and spent hours digging the garden and then rediging to incorporate compost. Today I made a 10 gallon batch of beer, cut and split a quarter cord of wood and did about a third of the planting I need to get done. I am exhausted and didn't get it all done, but that is all the time I have, cause tomorrow it is back to the grind.
Hey Brewer...It's the same thing with me, too. And if it's raining you can't even get those things done outside till another weekend. I usually have all of next year's firewood cut by about now...and haven't had the chance yet.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:52 AM   #94
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Thanks for clarifying! Music was my first guess, but "academia" didn't figure into it, although it makes sense.

If you don't mind delving a little deeper...most of the musical prodigies I've heard about seem to revolve around two instruments, piano and violin. In your experience, are those two instruments the most prominent, or are there others?

Thanks!
I'd say piano and violin for sure, with the addition of cello. Most violists began as violinists. Winds and brass often start later, coming in through a band program. They are also not demanded to play from memory, and not as much as soloists.
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:17 AM   #95
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When I was growing up, I don’t think “early retirement” as used now really existed—although if the term did exist it might have been used to mean somebody stopped working because they were injured and could no longer work. So, maybe I assumed that people were just supposed to work until they were 62 (or, what ever was considered a reasonable age to retire).
I can still remember the day I first focused on ER. It was in 1971 sitting at a table in my University cafeteria talking to this older, wiser 30 year old who had returned to school after working for a while. He asked me what I planned to do when I graduated and I said something to the effect of "I don't know, maybe teach or something." He mentioned a buddy of his who worked for Customs, had entered as a GS-5 a few years back and had been trained and quickly risen up to a GS-13 as a labor negotiator. The best thing was the guy could retire at 55 and could move around the country if he wanted to. I had not previously thought about retirement, just assumed all companies offered a DB plan. But I kept coming back to that retire at 55 idea, coupled with training and advancement and eventually applied for Federal employment. Interestingly I followed a career path similar to my friend's buddy and was a GS-13 labor relations specialist in a few years and moved to DC to advance beyond that. I liked my work but always loved the idea of the achieving FI and RE capability in my 50s.
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:48 AM   #96
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I had not previously thought about retirement, just assumed all companies offered a DB plan. But I kept coming back to that retire at 55 idea, coupled with training and advancement and eventually applied for Federal employment. Interestingly I followed a career path similar to my friend's buddy and was a GS-13 labor relations specialist in a few years and moved to DC to advance beyond that. I liked my work but always loved the idea of the achieving FI and RE capability in my 50s.
These are the type of career decisions that make a huge difference in life, but I never heard of any the career counselors for our kids ever even bringing up jobs with pensions / early retirement as a career consideration.
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Old 05-06-2013, 10:31 AM   #97
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I've been officially "w*rking" since 1971, so 42 years, including 30 in my current "ca-rear", so even if I enjoyed it, it's time to move on!

Actually, my career, as it was, suited me fairly well, though if I had it to do over again, I would have chosen IT instead of ET. I was a worker bee most of the time, so when the day was done, I went home, and didn't take w*rk home. Was never "on call", and was paid OT for extra hours/days.

Still, thirty years is a long time to do the same type of work, but starting over always seemed very risky compared to keeping the pay, bennies, and seniority. As it turned out, it worked okay, despite some setbacks...

Almost to the other side!
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Old 05-06-2013, 10:44 AM   #98
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.... When I was growing up, I don’t think “early retirement” as used now really existed.....
I can remember when the first person my age "early retired" with his family to a house in the Rockies at under 40. We just called it "made a fortune in the markets."
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:14 AM   #99
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Winds and brass often start later, coming in through a band program. They are also not demanded to play from memory, and not as much as soloists.
We were demanded to play from memory on brass in HS. Also, in drum corps and college marching band, it was all memorization. I played trombone, trumpet, and bugle.......
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:50 AM   #100
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We were demanded to play from memory on brass in HS. Also, in drum corps and college marching band, it was all memorization. I played trombone, trumpet, and bugle.......
I played trumpet (bounced between second and third chair, was never good enough for first chair) in my HS band. My HS's football team wasn't that good, and a lot of the people who showed up at games were there for the band. After our half-time performance, a lot of people would leave the stadium.

I still remember those hot Alabama days out on the practice field, getting our formations right. But it paid off, because we won several marching band competitions, and also concert band competitions at the state level.

Didn't continue my involvement at the college level, however. But it was fun while it lasted.
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