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Old 07-03-2013, 01:59 PM   #21
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Al,
I previously worked for a megacorp that had similar plans for my unit/me (expansion overseas, larger role/stress for me). I chose to keep my personal RE plans to myself and play along with them. I figured if they knew I was a short-timer then my bonus & stock options would be cut (knowing they award stock options to 'keep talent').

I'd go to the meeting with the VPs and play along. I wouldn't divulge your 3 year plan. I think your instincts that your bonus "might be at risk" is correct. Good luck!
I have to agree with this. Unless you're in a position to go ahead and retire now, I would play along for the next three years, collect the increases/bonuses, and then exit on your terms 3 years from now.

I've read (and seen) too many horror stories of people tipping their hand early, and then being handed their hat. You don't want that happening.

The stress and unwanted responsibility is probably something you don't want in the last few years there, but unless you can ER now, I vote to suck it up, take their money, and then ER in 3 years when you're in total control. That way, their response can't hurt you.
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:28 PM   #22
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My boss is pretty relaxed about things, to the extent he can be. When the time comes I plan to tell him I am quitting and then work out an exit date in good faith.
I think that is a good approach and is actually similar to what I did. I told them I intended to retire (actually quit in my case since I wasn't eligible for any firm retirement benefits) but that I wanted to leave on good terms and in a way that we all felt good about and we just worked out a date. It was a lot easier than I thought it would be and I think they appreciated it.
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Old 07-03-2013, 08:21 PM   #23
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Is there something wring with gving 2 weeks and being open to a somewhat more extended departure if they ask for it?
I'd agree that I'd stick with 2 weeks if I were you - after all, if you give them just 2 weeks notice, it might give them more incentive to make a really sweet offer to extend things. I know you've posted various times about the crap you deal with...but if they really want to keep you and shower you with money, it just might turn out to be enough to offset the frustrations for just a wee bit more time.

If you gave them 2-3 months, it gives them more time to react and find temporary substitutes to fill in while they look for a permanent replacement, and they may not be as inclined to make you an offer you can't refuse.
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Old 07-03-2013, 08:35 PM   #24
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I'd agree that I'd stick with 2 weeks if I were you - after all, if you give them just 2 weeks notice, it might give them more incentive to make a really sweet offer to extend things. I know you've posted various times about the crap you deal with...but if they really want to keep you and shower you with money, it just might turn out to be enough to offset the frustrations for just a wee bit more time.

If you gave them 2-3 months, it gives them more time to react and find temporary substitutes to fill in while they look for a permanent replacement, and they may not be as inclined to make you an offer you can't refuse.
At this point, I would be happiest to make a clean break. The job just keeps becoming more and more a baroque comedy of grotesque proportions. I was told today that when we go onto the client site next week we cannot evaluate the primary business they are in as part of our overall assessment. OK, I guess I will just grade them based on the state of the hallway carpets...
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Old 07-03-2013, 09:02 PM   #25
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At this point,.... The job just keeps becoming more and more a baroque comedy of grotesque proportions......
Too many of our j@bs resemble that remark
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:36 PM   #26
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I have to agree with this. Unless you're in a position to go ahead and retire now, I would play along for the next three years, collect the increases/bonuses, and then exit on your terms 3 years from now.

I've read (and seen) too many horror stories of people tipping their hand early, and then being handed their hat. You don't want that happening.

The stress and unwanted responsibility is probably something you don't want in the last few years there, but unless you can ER now, I vote to suck it up, take their money, and then ER in 3 years when you're in total control. That way, their response can't hurt you.
I agree. Seems like the consensus here is to play along and not even hint at my ER plans. I had an idea to write down my short term and long term goals for my group ahead of time and go over it with my office manager before we have the group meeting with the VP. None of my long term goals would include expansion of my responsibilities , but a suggestion to hire more senior level folks like me in several other key regions we support now that would be better to be regionally self sufficient . My plan would be more corporately structured than just a plan for my group.
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Old 07-05-2013, 06:45 AM   #27
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I'm of the opinion you should play along, but with a slight hedge in your conversations in asking them what their plans would be if you decided to retire before we 67.


I'm much younger, but go through this internal debate. I'm given the "sunglasses" conversation at work (your future is so bright you'll need sunglasses), but not always sure I want the megacorp middle management role. I'm in it for another 5-15 years before and would be inclined to take it.

I may not "retire" but being financially independent and renting jet skis at the beach isn't exactly work.
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:56 AM   #28
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Having long term goals for a business unit is NOT incongruent with personal plans to ER.
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Old 07-05-2013, 09:59 AM   #29
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Don't tell your managers anything until no earlier than a month before your retirement date. I made the mistake of telling a couple of managers I trusted about 6 months before my retirement that I was planning to go. I did this because my group was in a state of total change (being disbanded and responsibilities shifted to other parts of the company) and I wanted to make sure that my replacement would be retained and not shipped out.

I was really surprised 2 months later when one of these people came to me and told me that my retirement plans were open knowledge at the leadership team meeting. I guess I know which one of the people I trusted had violated my trust!!!.

Anyway, the train was on the tracks and any negotiating opportunities I might of had were gone. As it happened, things turned out the way I had planned so there was no harm. But.... If I had mentioned this in spring of 2008 by fall of 2008, I would have wanted to reverse my plans.

I would not recommend to anyone that they give anything more than a month's notice. Its been my experience with a megacorp that managers can't actually take any action to fill a personnel slot until it is open. So telling your manager that your leaving doesn't allow him to do anything actionable about it. As others have said, a moderately well run company will be able to deal with a key person's absence with only moderate pain, even with no notice.
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Old 07-05-2013, 01:24 PM   #30
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Is there something wring with giving 2 weeks and being open to a somewhat more extended departure if they ask for it?
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I would not recommend to anyone that they give anything more than a month's notice. Its been my experience with a megacorp that managers can't actually take any action to fill a personnel slot until it is open. So telling your manager that your leaving doesn't allow him to do anything actionable about it. As others have said, a moderately well run company will be able to deal with a key person's absence with only moderate pain, even with no notice.
And a month is on the long end, I believe.

Lots of people have the "what will they do without me" attitude. In fact, a well run company should have contingency plans that cover situations in which each and every employee never show up to work again. There have been events in the past in which many key people never showed up at work again and some of those plans were put into action. Guess what -- the sun still rises in the east and sets in the west.
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Old 07-05-2013, 02:02 PM   #31
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Some of us had contractual arrangements requiring long notice periods, built in to protect the organization. If that doesn't apply, then you have no reason to give more notice than is legally required.
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Old 07-05-2013, 02:10 PM   #32
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Some of us had contractual arrangements requiring long notice periods, built in to protect the organization. If that doesn't apply, then you have no reason to give more notice than is legally required.
Good reason, as are stock options, restricted shares of stock, bonus. But other than the few financial reasons, take care of yourself and family.
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Old 07-05-2013, 04:10 PM   #33
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Never tip your hand. Help develop your people and delegate as much as possible. That will help both you in the short term and megacorp in the long term. But, never tip your hand, never.
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