Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-20-2008, 10:13 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
freebird5825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: East Nowhere, 43N Latitude, NY
Posts: 9,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looking Ahead View Post
This is so painful. Please, somebody tell me the bounce will come. This depression talk is freaking me out.
this is the best i can offer. maybe it will make you smile in the face of the raging hurricane.
Tigger's Bounce
you need to let it install shockwave.
__________________

__________________
"All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." - Walt Disney
freebird5825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-21-2008, 04:50 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 4,330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looking Ahead View Post
This is so painful. Please, somebody tell me the bounce will come. This depression talk is freaking me out.
A bounce will come. Feeling better?

Look at it another way. Even the Great Depression ended. Back then a lot of government policies prolonged it. Hopefully, we've learned the lessons and can get things moving quicker and keep it to the recession level.
__________________

__________________
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane -- Marcus Aurelius
2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 07:14 AM   #23
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 17
Firebird and 2B,
Thanks for the smiles! Yeah, I feel a tad bit better this a.m. Of course, the market hasn't opened yet. lol.
__________________
Looking Ahead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 10:50 AM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurence View Post
Excellent post, very germane to our situation (buying with years to go to ER) but not much solace to our ER'ed friends.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREdreamer View Post
Point well taken, sorry ER'ed friends! Though I guess they could always take advantage of the lower prices by rebalancing... I don't know if I would have the guts to do it myself, had I already retired, but the option is available for those brave enough!
Good in theory, but I started rebalancing when it dropped 30% and again at 40% (roughly). I've got some bravery left, but no money left

Not literally no money left - but I'm about 70% eq now, and a good chunk of the 30% is hi yield bonds which are acting pretty much like equities. So, no money that I want to take further risk with - I'm pretty far out there as it is. Maybe I am out of bravery, too. I am sooooo ready for a recovery. This is a drop of historic proportions, and I *do*mean that literally (unfortunately)!

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Chart Shows That Current Bear is Alltime #3 0r 4 in Overall Loss
Old 11-21-2008, 11:18 AM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,382
Chart Shows That Current Bear is Alltime #3 0r 4 in Overall Loss

__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 11:24 AM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
Lusitan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Boston
Posts: 620
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurence View Post
Target Retirement 2035 here. Yay for me....

Well, yeah ... you're not going to escape the downturn with a target retirement fund. But chin up - that fund is automatically rebalancing for you.

I'm glad I don't have to rebalance during this market, because my target retirement fund is doing it for me. I just try not to look ...
__________________
Lusitan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 11:52 AM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
FinanceDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 12,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2B View Post
A bounce will come. Feeling better?
Dead Cat, or otherwise?
__________________
Consult with your own advisor or representative. My thoughts should not be construed as investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results (love that one).......:)


This Thread is USELESS without pics.........:)
FinanceDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 02:10 PM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,382
I want to comment on the chart I posted above. For most of us, our entire investing lives have been spent with the idea that data from prior to WW2 is probably not very meaningful, because of institutional changes, smarter investors ( this was asserted by James K Glassman from the Washington Post who wrote Dow 36,000.) Ithink Jermey Siegal also promoted this idea. "Investors have finally igured out that the equity risk premium should be zero", blah, blah.

In light of this, I find it interesting that our current bear is the deepest fall from any peak since WW2. The other deep falls were during the long bear in the first 2 decades of the 20th century. And of course, El Oso Mayor 1929-1932.

By some other metrics since as smoothed PEs, those bottoms were much cheaper than today. And the bottoms in 1982 and 1974 although coming after a less steep fall, took valuations as measured by smoothed PEs lower than today's. It always looks hard when confronting it as a future; and incredibly obvious when looked at from the other side

It is like it always is, maybe the market will turn up soon, or maybe this is going to test those old levels which no longer seem so antique.

The only really simple way to invest is to use a conservative and appropriate AA, and let 'er ride.

Since this relentless crash, we tend to come up with all kinds of ad hoc prescriptions that appear as if they would have helped us avoid this mess. And they would have, had we been been able to know in advance just how this mess would unfold

An idea has become popular on the board lately that had we not been so dumb we would have pulled out last fall. Maybe, but it wohuldn't have been due to anything other than a hunch. Values last fall were pretty similar to values during the huge bull market of the 90s that enabled many of us to ER in the first place.

Suddenly Prof. Shiller is a hero, but all during early and middle parts of this decade any mention of Shiller attracted the obvious retort- "He would have got you out in 1996, and you would have missed the whole super bull market."

How many of us would be retired if we had rolled over our CDs year to year? (ignoring recients of early pensions.)

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 03:21 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
How many of us would be retired if we had rolled over our CDs year to year? (ignoring recients of early pensions.)
I always ignore recipients of early pensions.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 03:41 PM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
freebird5825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: East Nowhere, 43N Latitude, NY
Posts: 9,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looking Ahead View Post
Firebird and 2B,
Thanks for the smiles! Yeah, I feel a tad bit better this a.m. Of course, the market hasn't opened yet. lol.
YW
i actually played the Disney site Tigger Bounce game. it was fun! once i got through 2 boards, the game got super fast. i need to practice more!
__________________
"All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." - Walt Disney
freebird5825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 04:02 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DblDoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,224
Bounce!

S&P up 6.3%
FTSE ex US up 8.4%

Enjoy it all weekend cuz who knows what will unfold next week...

DD
__________________
DblDoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 04:08 PM   #32
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Yay! The Dow is down only 5 percent this week!
__________________
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 04:21 PM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Newport Beach
Posts: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post

An idea has become popular on the board lately that had we not been so dumb we would have pulled out last fall. Maybe, but it wohuldn't have been due to anything other than a hunch. Values last fall were pretty similar to values during the huge bull market of the 90s that enabled many of us to ER in the first place.

Suddenly Prof. Shiller is a hero, but all during early and middle parts of this decade any mention of Shiller attracted the obvious retort- "He would have got you out in 1996, and you would have missed the whole super bull market."

Ha
What irritates me the most is the large number of people now saying "it was obvious, you should have listened to Shiller, Roubini, Rosenberg, Schiff". It seems to me that these guys are ALWAYS bearish. In fact, Rosenberg, having revised his target for the S&P from 775 - 650 on Monday, took it down to 450 today!! I don't know, is he still right? Should I sell now? Schiff was on NPR last night talking about DOW below 5000 and gold at at least $5K. Is he still going to be right?

I know there are no answers. I am just frustrated and feeling pretty stupid for being apparently one of the only people that didn't see it coming.
__________________
newporttony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 04:29 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREdreamer View Post
Let's focus on the positive! 1931 may have been the worst year for equities ever, but 1933 was the beat year for equities ever (+54%)! So I am still hoping for a very strong rally in 2009 or 2010!
54% would help. It would get us back to only a 25% loss from the peak.... in 2000 and 2007. We can hope!
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 05:00 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
I want to comment on the chart I posted above. For most of us, our entire investing lives have been spent with the idea that data from prior to WW2 is probably not very meaningful, because of institutional changes, smarter investors ( this was asserted by James K Glassman from the Washington Post who wrote Dow 36,000.) Ithink Jermey Siegal also promoted this idea. "Investors have finally igured out that the equity risk premium should be zero", blah, blah.

In light of this, I find it interesting that our current bear is the deepest fall from any peak since WW2. The other deep falls were during the long bear in the first 2 decades of the 20th century. And of course, El Oso Mayor 1929-1932.

By some other metrics since as smoothed PEs, those bottoms were much cheaper than today. And the bottoms in 1982 and 1974 although coming after a less steep fall, took valuations as measured by smoothed PEs lower than today's. It always looks hard when confronting it as a future; and incredibly obvious when looked at from the other side

It is like it always is, maybe the market will turn up soon, or maybe this is going to test those old levels which no longer seem so antique.

The only really simple way to invest is to use a conservative and appropriate AA, and let 'er ride.

Since this relentless crash, we tend to come up with all kinds of ad hoc prescriptions that appear as if they would have helped us avoid this mess. And they would have, had we been been able to know in advance just how this mess would unfold

An idea has become popular on the board lately that had we not been so dumb we would have pulled out last fall. Maybe, but it wohuldn't have been due to anything other than a hunch. Values last fall were pretty similar to values during the huge bull market of the 90s that enabled many of us to ER in the first place.

Suddenly Prof. Shiller is a hero, but all during early and middle parts of this decade any mention of Shiller attracted the obvious retort- "He would have got you out in 1996, and you would have missed the whole super bull market."

How many of us would be retired if we had rolled over our CDs year to year? (ignoring recients of early pensions.)

Ha

Thanks for explaining the chart . I've been through several of these markets but this has been brutal probably because now I'm actually using some of the money before it was just on paper and occasionally paid for expensive travel now it is paying for groceries so even though I probably will not do it . I would like to think that next time and their will always be a next time I'll cut my losses at 20% and park a huge chunk until the market starts to recover . I know that goes against everything I've ever read but so does watching my hard earned money go down the drain .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 05:06 PM   #36
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
I think planning in advance when you might want to cut your losses is as important as planning your asset allocation.
__________________
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 05:28 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 4,330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestwifeever View Post
I think planning in advance when you might want to cut your losses is as important as planning your asset allocation.
There's always the issue of when panic is the correct response. I am totally sure of one thing. I can't predict the future. I've reduced my equities to the point I can survive a non-end of world scenario with my CD stash for an indefinite period of time. DW (the real best wife ever ) may not like the lifestyle but we will be ok.
__________________
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane -- Marcus Aurelius
2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 09:03 PM   #38
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moemg View Post
... but so does watching my hard earned money go down the drain .
Have you lost the principal you've invested in the market, or have you "lost" reinvested earnings?

You probably worked hard for the former, but not so much for the latter...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2008, 08:57 AM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestwifeever View Post
I think planning in advance when you might want to cut your losses is as important as planning your asset allocation.
Easy to say - but how does one actually do this?

If you get out whenever there is a, say, 20% dip - how do you know when to get back in? You are very likely to have sold low, and then miss the swing back up, possibly buying high. Print out a chart of the S&P for 50 years, and try it - not looking in hindsight, but use some predetermined formula, and move forward in time. Cover up the 'future' and just make the buy/sell decision based on past/"current" numbers.

Let us know if you come up with a system that even worked in the past, let alone will apply to the future.

I know a lot of people promote the idea of "stop-loss" orders on their stocks. Sure it might save you from a big loss, but it also assures a lot of small losses, and missing some run-ups. If it was a winning strategy overall, I'm sure the mutual funds would use it and report amazing above-market returns with lower volatility.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2008, 10:04 AM   #40
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Erd, argue at will (and I know you enjoy that ), but I'm not talking about getting out when the market is down 20 percent and predicting which way it will go. I'm talking about getting out when your nest egg drops 20 percent (if that's one's comfort number) and putting what's left into CDs, at the most basic level, or other holdings where you at least won't lose principal. No one can predict the markets but we can protect what we have and decide where that is.

Cutting your losses is a totally different concept from buying high, selling low or market timing--it's a personal factor imho. And for people who are past the accumulation phase, like me, it seems to be an important consideration--maybe I'll decide to forego potential run-ups to preserve the bulk of our capital at this point.

That is a good point Nords about hard working savings vs. earnings and growth on those savings--that is something we have always kept in mind when viewing gains and losses.
__________________

__________________
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best & Worst J*b You Ever Had (Have) freebird5825 Other topics 74 01-13-2009 04:54 PM
maybe worst year yet mathjak107 FIRE and Money 4 01-22-2008 06:05 PM
Your worst moments / worst failures? Nords Other topics 28 07-13-2007 12:03 AM
the best & worst of early retirement lazygood4nothinbum Other topics 11 02-05-2007 06:48 PM
Best & worst living costs Nords Life after FIRE 0 05-13-2005 07:18 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:21 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.