Join Early Retirement Today
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-15-2014, 05:20 PM   #41
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
Wow. So few giving up citizenship compared to the millions clamoring to get in. Something must be OK about living here for at least a few of us.
The following excerpt I saw first thing in the linked article:

...many of the expatiates (sic) who have been named are wealthy or high earners—like Facebook billionaire Eduardo Saverin or pop star Tina Turner...

Those aren't people who cannot afford healthcare in the US. Something else is going on, but I am not curious enough to find out.

As for me, now I do not see myself even moving to the Puget Sound, a place that drove my choice of screen name. I am getting too tired, too old, too fast. Oh well...
__________________

__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is online now  
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-15-2014, 05:29 PM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
Wow. So few giving up citizenship compared to the millions clamoring to get in. Something must be OK about living here for at least a few of us.

daylatedollarshort - if you had added your name to the list of folks giving up their citizenship, then it would have been an even 3,000. By neglecting this, it remained at 2,999, about 1 person out of every 100,000.
There are more choosing to live abroad in retirement than actually giving up citizenship. And many are wanting to come here are for the salaries or in general they want to live in a developed country over a third world country, which means net immigration inflows in developed countries other than just the U.S.

For some, social factors like cultural diversity, tolerance and a culture of accepting other ideas, races, sexual orientation, religions and opinions without hostility, feeling threatened, defensiveness or snottiness, are also important factors in choosing where to live.

There are pros and cons to living in the U.S as well as many other countries. I don't think the only option is America - love it or leave it. I don't get the attitude that there is no better place on earth to live. There are lots of nice places to live. It is not like everyone in the U.S. is fantastically happy and the rest of the world wakes up every day depressed because they don't live here.
__________________

__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 05:42 PM   #43
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post

There are pros and cons to living in the U.S as well as many other countries. I don't think the only option is America - love it or leave it.

And this is why we celebrate that diversity on the forum: those USA residents, our many non-USA residents, those who desire to retire in the USA, and those who are exploring retirement in other places. This diversity of experience and perspectives is what keeps me around. It's a big tent, y'all.

Thanks for reminding us of that, daylate!
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 05:46 PM   #44
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
Oh, by the way, look at my post above, did you know that "expatiate" is a word? It shares nothing with "expatriate".
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is online now  
Old 07-15-2014, 05:49 PM   #45
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,965
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
There are more choosing to live abroad in retirement than actually giving up citizenship.
You're the one who posted the link to the 2,999 folks who gave up their citizenship. I simply noted that that is about 1 in 100,000, not exactly an outbound stampede. I'm certainly not concerned about a population shortage here anytime soon.
Quote:


There are pros and cons to living in the U.S as well as many other countries. I don't think the only option is America - love it or leave it.
Absolutely! Nor is the only option to move away to someplace where health care, LTC, tolerance of some alternative lifestyle, climate or some other specific issue is more to your liking. We're fortunate to live in a country where the pros outweigh the cons for many of us and it's hard to find another place where, net-net, life would be better. Therefore, if some feature of another country, such as climate for example, appeals to you, at least look at the other aspects of life there before committing to a move.

Did you get something other than that from the article?
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:04 PM   #46
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
The subject of moving after retirement comes up here every so often. Not as drastic as moving overseas, but merely across state lines. And darn if I can't find that article again, with real statistics showing that most people simply stay put, just like the majority of us here. And of those that do move, many only move a short distance like 100 miles or so. I guess it's mostly to go from a metropolitan area to a town further away to a less congested area. That's it!

It does take a lot of work to go overseas, particularly for people with roots and "stuff". My earlier fantasies of retiring to Provence and Tuscany were driven by reading Peter Mayle and Frances Mayes. Hah!
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is online now  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:05 PM   #47
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
You're the one who posted the link to the 2,999 folks who gave up their citizenship. I simply noted that that is about 1 in 100,000, not exactly an outbound stampede. I'm certainly not concerned about a population shortage here anytime soon.Absolutely! Nor is the only option to move away to someplace where health care, LTC, tolerance of some alternative lifestyle, climate or some other specific issue is more to your liking. We're fortunate to live in a country where the pros outweigh the cons for many of us and it's hard to find another place where, net-net, life would be better. Therefore, if some feature of another country, such as climate for example, appeals to you, at least look at the other aspects of life there before committing to a move.

Did you get something other than that from the article?
I wasn't picking up an abundance of tolerance vibes from your comment about "daylatedollarshort - if you had added your name to the list of folks giving up their citizenship, then it would have been an even 3,000. By neglecting this, it remained at 2,999, about 1 person out of every 100,000. "

My apologies if I misinterpreted your intent.

I am not giving up my U.S citizenship. Who knows in 20 years the Green Party might be in power here.
__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:11 PM   #48
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,965
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
My apologies if I misinterpreted your intent.
You did misinterpret.

2,999 people turning in their citizenships is not a large number. It's something around 1 in 100,000. The murder rate in Chicago alone is 18 times that (2012). Rates of traffic fatalities on Memorial Day weekend dwarf it. ETC.

We have much bigger fish to fry than correcting issues that cause folks to renounce citizenship, IMHO.

You seemed to be posting the link to show that something must be wrong here since so many people are renouncing their citizenships. So many? Nah.......
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:37 PM   #49
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 892
It would be interesting to know how many people chose to retire outside of their home country and for what reasons. That would be an interesting thread/poll and maybe it has been done before. Unfortunately I'm on my phone right now, so searching is difficult.

I tend to think the overall number isn't high and mostly done for financial reasons (I can retire sooner), but I could be wrong.
__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:40 PM   #50
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
Who knows in 20 years the Green Party might be in power here.
The Green Party may just make all of us go back to work too.

But in 20 years, I may not be alive, so I am not going to worry about it then.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is online now  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:45 PM   #51
Full time employment: Posting here.
dtbach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Madison
Posts: 752
I'm thinking extended vacations make a lot more sense than moving permanently abroad. Spent a lot of time living in other locals in 22 years in the Navy. Had some great experiences but was always glad to get back to the states.
__________________
Wild Bill shoulda taken more out of his IRA when he could have. . . .
dtbach is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:48 PM   #52
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
You did misinterpret.

2,999 people turning in their citizenships is not a large number. It's something around 1 in 100,000. The murder rate in Chicago alone is 18 times that (2012). Rates of traffic fatalities on Memorial Day weekend dwarf it. ETC.

We have much bigger fish to fry than correcting issues that cause folks to renounce citizenship, IMHO.

You seemed to be posting the link to show that something must be wrong here since so many people are renouncing their citizenships. So many? Nah.......
I posted the link in response to the OPs link 5 reasons not to retire abroad to provide another perspective.

Perhaps this would have been a more appropriate counterpoint -

What's driving Americans to retire abroad?

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/a...or-lack-of-it/

"As many as 3.3 million American baby boomers are planning to retire abroad, according to figures from Travel Market Report, the industry publication. Three years ago, the paid subscription base of International Living, a magazine for retirees who live overseas or plan to, was 39,000; today, it’s 80,000."
__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:58 PM   #53
Recycles dryer sheets
Derslickmeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtbach View Post
I'm thinking extended vacations make a lot more sense than moving permanently abroad. Spent a lot of time living in other locals in 22 years in the Navy. Had some great experiences but was always glad to get back to the states.
Ditto. When returning from traveling abroad (Europe or Asia) for w**k, I have not found a more satisfying feeling than when the customs agent at DFW looks at my passport and says "welcome home"
__________________
Derslickmeister is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 07:07 PM   #54
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiki View Post
It would be interesting to know how many people chose to retire outside of their home country and for what reasons. That would be an interesting thread/poll and maybe it has been done before. Unfortunately I'm on my phone right now, so searching is difficult.

I tend to think the overall number isn't high and mostly done for financial reasons (I can retire sooner), but I could be wrong.
Earlier someone mentioned the British retirement colonies in Spain. That one would seem to be easy to understand, given English weather.

We estadounidenses can go to Florida, or Southern California and still be in the US.

I think if I lived in some of those very difficult climates in the Eastern US I would be considering leaving too. Thankfully, that is not the case. Though admittedly Seattle is not Shangri-La, it beats Chicago or Des Moines.

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is online now  
Old 07-15-2014, 07:15 PM   #55
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 112
After 27 years living as an expat, I am hoping from 2015 to scale back from work which will involve spending (hopefully) 49% of my time in Australia.
(I don't want to get over 50% and become an Australian tax resident while earning income overseas).
I am hoping that plan will give me the best of both worlds.

In another 15 years (when I am 70) I will want to live in Australia as I may need access to the free universal health care - but until that time, I do not see any advantage in permanently relocating.

Things may change along the way.

I agree about the whining expats - but they tend to be the short term expats who do a single 3 year contract and spend the whole time complaining how things don't work. Things don't work in Australia and when I ring up to complain I spend 45 minutes on hold waiting to get through to a customer service officer (who is probably sitting in a call centre in India or the Philippines.)
__________________
Aus_E_Expat is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 08:00 PM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtbach View Post
I'm thinking extended vacations make a lot more sense than moving permanently abroad. Spent a lot of time living in other locals in 22 years in the Navy. Had some great experiences but was always glad to get back to the states.
That's what I'm considering. Schengen allows 90 days without a visa.

Some EU nations may issue residency visas to people who can demonstrate they have retirement resources.

But you wouldn't have access to their health care system and you might be subject to fees and taxes, especially if you buy property.
__________________
explanade is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 08:45 PM   #57
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
Earlier someone mentioned the British retirement colonies in Spain. That one would seem to be easy to understand, given English weather.

We estadounidenses can go to Florida, or Southern California and still be in the US.

I think if I lived in some of those very difficult climates in the Eastern US I would be considering leaving too. Thankfully, that is not the case. Though admittedly Seattle is not Shangri-La, it beats Chicago or Des Moines.

Ha

I agree. I went back to the Midwest for a few days this summer and it was hot. And the family told me about last winter. I'll take Seattle over that any day. The only problem with Seattle is COL and gray winters, even though the latter doesn't seem as bad lately.

Personally, I can see us traveling around for extended periods of time, but as we get older we'll gravitate to where the kids - and hopefully grand kids - are living. Since we're still working, that's the bar we have to meet before we pull the plug. If it wasn't, then we could easily pull the plug and move south of the border.
__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 08:59 PM   #58
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by explanade View Post
That's what I'm considering. Schengen allows 90 days without a visa.



Some EU nations may issue residency visas to people who can demonstrate they have retirement resources.



But you wouldn't have access to their health care system and you might be subject to fees and taxes, especially if you buy property.

We're also planning on extended vacations, 3-6 months at a time, maybe more or less. Need to wait until the kids leave the house, but we could easily spend a few months in a place or until it becomes uninteresting and move on. I suspect this will eventually get old and we'll then settle down, probably close - but not too close - to where our kids live.
__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline  
Old 07-15-2014, 11:37 PM   #59
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: No Where for Very Long
Posts: 747
How well do most of us understand US street talk? If you are like me, you get surprises every day. So just ask yourself how well will you ever understand Thai street talk?


Only enough to be dangerous

Seriously I can get by in Thai, but if the locals want to "lose" me, they can. Just as I can with US slang or complex vocabulary. If the locals suspect you understand Thai, they simply switch to Isan/Lao, Mon or one of the many mountain dialects.

Thailand is like peeling an onion, there is always another layer to be removed and you never get to the core. Unless a Westerner came to Thailand at a very early age and was fully immersed in its languages and customs, he will always be at some what of a disadvantage.

The longer I'm here the less I understand the place...
__________________

Lancelot is offline  
Old 07-16-2014, 08:30 AM   #60
Full time employment: Posting here.
BTravlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 994
The author of the article linked by the OP is a real estate salesman. I think he's really just complaining about losing out on all of those commissions.
__________________

__________________
Wherever you go, there you are.
(In other words, no whining!)
BTravlin is offline  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reasons People Do Not Retire (Financial and Other) Shawn FIRE and Money 70 07-07-2013 08:40 PM
Blogger lists 14 reasons not to retire early Gerbil Wheel Young Dreamers 21 02-15-2012 09:02 AM
retire abroad Stevewc Health and Early Retirement 54 09-29-2009 08:49 PM
IRS: Reasons not to retire pfpelican FIRE and Money 6 06-21-2007 02:16 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:31 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.