Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-01-2015, 08:15 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,495
Here's another post from that same blog. Hope you find it useful (the comments are interesting as well):

A Satisfying Journey: How To Retire
__________________

__________________
Options is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-01-2015, 08:19 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nodak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cavalier
Posts: 2,317
It took me about a month. The most surprising thing was that first Sunday night when I didn't have to think about going to work in the morning. That was a very pleasant feeling.
__________________

__________________
"Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent." Pogo Possum (Walt Kelly)
Nodak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 08:48 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 3,856
I worked part-time for 7 years after working 16 full-time years and before fully ERing in 2008. Going from part-time to ER was not a big change to my everyday life because I already had a full slate of activities. I was able to slightly expand on those activities and avoid the frequent scheduling conflicts I had in those part-time years juggling a work schedule with those activities.


The bigger change to my everyday life was when I first switched from working full-time to part-time. Right away, I was able to add those new activities to my everyday life. But just as important (and useful), I was able to do my everyday errands on weekdays instead of fitting them into the busy Saturday mornings. That was such a relief and benefit. Doing my food shopping on a weekday morning at 10:30 AM instead of on a Saturday morning at 10:30 AM was so much better, for example. It didn't take long to get used to that and having to wake up early on fewer days. I did develop a two-tiered life, though, with the long and awful commute to work on 2 or 3 days and the easier, more comfortable life on the other days. This did cause a few problems such as getting so used to my afternoon nap on the off-days that I would become drowsy at work after 3 PM on the work days but unable to nap LOL! Now I can nap every afternoon .
__________________
Retired in late 2008 at age 45. Cashed in company stock, bought a lot of shares in a big bond fund and am living nicely off its dividends. IRA, SS, and a pension await me at age 60 and later. No kids, no debts.

"I want my money working for me instead of me working for my money!"
scrabbler1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 10:26 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Los Angeles area
Posts: 1,432
No adjustment period - I was happy the day I retired almost 9 years ago, even though my job (programming) had been stress-free for most of my career. I suppose I spent a year or so on deferred projects (digitizing all photos and documents, etc) before truly winding down.
__________________
learn, work, save, invest, fire
CyclingInvestor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 10:42 PM   #25
Full time employment: Posting here.
Calico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Options View Post
Here's another post from that same blog. Hope you find it useful (the comments are interesting as well):

A Satisfying Journey: How To Retire
Thanks for the links to this blog. I've done some reading there tonight, and bookmarked the site for future reference. I like the author's take on "simple living."
__________________
Calico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 10:44 PM   #26
Recycles dryer sheets
texcurtis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 82
Although I was very committed to my work and enjoyed working with a lot of the people, I am shocked how much I do not miss work. Not at all, not a bit. It's been 7 months and I have not once wanted to go back to work.

The adjustment is not missing work, but crafting a new life filled with only things I love.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
texcurtis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 10:58 PM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,562
Took a while for me, over a year. Year two, wow what a joy this is!
__________________
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 11:00 AM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 295
DH and I also read Ernie Zelinski's "The Joy of Not Working" about six months ahead of ER'ing, and it was probably the most significant thing we did in preparation. As happy as I was to resign and step away from the stress and misery that my job had begun to represent, I was almost as equally nervous about what I'd do with my time once I no longer had the majority of it accounted for. This book, with it's emphasis on living a life of quality, based on how you define that, was ever so helpful in creating a template for what our day-to-day ER lives might look like.

Although my DH seemed to transition immediately, I did not. I would describe my phases as follows: 1)Euphoria (the first two weeks), 2) Overwhelming sadness at the loss of my former self (about five days) 3) Confusion on where to go now (about one week), 4) Slowly building contentment (about two years) as I identified what activities had gave me a sense of excitement and aliveness, to, finally, 5) Deep joy and contentment as we successfully created a new life uniquely suited to us (the start of year three and forward)

Now, about five years in, life seems to have both slowed down and sped up, if that makes sense. We're learned to slow down and take things in as we go, but we're equally good going 100 mph at other times. The ying and the yang it would appear.

Someone here has a moniker that states that they recreate their retirement every five years. On a year to year basis I believe we now do the same. Our list of things we want to accomplish and places we want to go seems to simply get longer and longer!
__________________
ElizabethT is offline   Reply With Quote
Retired from, without a plan of "to"
Old 09-02-2015, 10:25 PM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 355
Retired from, without a plan of "to"

I retired to get away from my job, expecting anything to be better, much better. My first eight years of being workless became the best years of my life.

I spent several months looking into various recreation and volunteer activities until I found what suited me. My first day of retirement, I sat in a recliner and read an interesting book, cover to cover. I had no idea that was possible. I hadn't ever been that not busy in my life.

Wishing the best to others who are newly workless.
__________________
heyyou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 05:58 AM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Dash man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Limerick
Posts: 1,668
I was able to adjust to retirement immediately, but unfortunately my dog has not. He still wakes me up at 5:00 a.m. everyday to feed him. Resistance is futile.
__________________
Dash man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 06:52 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,126
Took me 2-3 years. There were important financial issues but these were not what you would have expected. Turns out I had plenty of money and started seeing myself as some rich guy. Never really did before retirement as I was working so hard accumulating equity/options,etc. When it came time to start spending this "stash" it was quite a bit more income than I spent before retirement. This required an attitude adjustment.
Also, I Defined myself as my job. This took quite a while to shake and come up with a new "me"
So for 2-3 years this new me was a bit of a jerk, I think. Hopefully not any more.
Actually not working was quite easy. Didn't miss it at all.
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 06:56 AM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,695
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeBear View Post
Yep, marko. He's still w*rking. Hehh, hehhh, hehhh...
YES!!! heheheheheheh!!
As my signature says, "Living well is the best revenge"
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 10:12 AM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,705
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
I put together a spreadsheet to convince myself that we could do it. I determined that we might have some lean years if the markets did not cooperate. We were OK with that because lean meant not going to Europe and not going to Mexico. DW kept working part time for two years and could have easily ramped up. I actively managed our portfolio during that time with some success, earning my keep.

So the transition was longer than most, probably completing the transition as a family in 2.5 years. Now, nine years after DW retired, we are just fine and the recent market meltdown has reinforced that.
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 10:25 AM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 944
I was so incredibly happy! Being free of all the drama was GREAT!

My only adjustment was getting used to spending, not saving. I was pretty darn cheap the first 6 months or so. Now I rarely worry about $. I'm not buying new vehicles every day, but spend freely

I strongly recommend ER!
__________________
Freed at 49. You only live once - live it
Donzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 10:32 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcowan View Post
I put together a spreadsheet to convince myself that we could do it. I determined that we might have some lean years if the markets did not cooperate. We were OK with that because lean meant not going to Europe and not going to Mexico.
On the lean years, I probably would have still gone to Mexico, stayed there longer and lived like a king (well, a minor noble perhaps) on the same amount that would have just been barely enough to survive in the US.
__________________
hnzw_rui is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 11:22 AM   #36
Full time employment: Posting here.
Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 781
I retired 8/1/2014 (18 months earlier than planned). My mother was requiring more help do to health issues, so this allowed me to take her to appointments and to research options for more care. I also had lots of plans for outdoor recreational fun. enrolled in and attended H&R tax classes for employment in the winter months (that weird need to still earn my way). Mom passed in on 8/31/14 and I was immediately engaged in taking care of her affairs and small estate and the time flew by. I didn't pursue the tax work because I was too busy and decided the time would be better spent with enjoyable activities (handling Moms estate provided me "purpose").
One year later, wrapping up the final details of the estate and looking back on a fun summer of hiking, climbing, traveling and gardening. I've relaxed significantly, love retirement and don't miss work at all. DH will join me next year. It will be interesting to see how he adapts.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
"Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" - Mary Oliver
Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 01:09 PM   #37
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 620
I did all of my adjusting while I was still working. The more I adjusted, the greater the feeling that I was "dying inside" while sitting at my desk. As soon as the golden handcuffs were off, I got out, the dying feeling disappeared immediately, and I've never looked back.
__________________
Which Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2015, 09:59 AM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,705
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnzw_rui View Post
On the lean years, I probably would have still gone to Mexico, stayed there longer and lived like a king (well, a minor noble perhaps) on the same amount that would have just been barely enough to survive in the US.
Yes we have discovered that as well. When I did the spreadsheet, I was uninformed. Since then, we have found that spending 6 months in Mexico and 1 month in Europe has reduced our annual budget by over 30%. This is because
1) We live in Vancouver, and
2) We sublet our place in Vancouver for 5-6 months.
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2015, 11:33 AM   #39
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danmar View Post
Took me 2-3 years. There were important financial issues but these were not what you would have expected. Turns out I had plenty of money and started seeing myself as some rich guy. Never really did before retirement as I was working so hard accumulating equity/options,etc. When it came time to start spending this "stash" it was quite a bit more income than I spent before retirement. This required an attitude adjustment.
With the surging market from 2009-2015, I think that even new retirees with lower incomes than yours have felt the same way, relatively speaking. Market conditions have seemed nearly miraculous to me as a 2009 retiree, and social security actually did materialize for me despite my prior doubts.

So, I bought my dream house and like the Jefferson's on that old TV series, I'm movin' on up. I moved on up! Never thought I'd live such a nice and luxurious life in retirement. I'm working on the attitude adjustment but have a long way to go.



As for the psychological aspects of adjusting to retirement, like missing work and so on, that was automatic and probably fully in place before I got home after my last day at work. If someone doesn't want the freedom to control what he does with his time all day without being ordered around either by bosses or by the requirements of the job, he might have issues of this type.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2015, 12:18 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,705
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
If someone doesn't want the freedom to control what he does with his time all day without being ordered around either by bosses or by the requirements of the job, he might have issues of this type.
Actually, I was the one giving orders. But surprisingly, it was just as easy to retire. In fact, I had to start taking orders from SWMBO, a sobering experience that turned out to be a good strategy.

She manages the household and I manage the money. So far, so good! Turns out she is good at spending and I am good at not spending.

But unlike you, we still live in our penthouse, but, like you, we bought our dream vacation home in Mexico. So life is good and we are probably spending close to you for our annual budget, thanks to Mexico.

(I just hope that Frank approves!)
__________________

__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retiring early with kids; Big adjustment when they left? FUEGO Life after FIRE 18 06-05-2014 05:20 PM
Asset Allocation Adjustment ferco FIRE and Money 8 08-09-2005 07:21 PM
Portfolio Adjustment Spanky FIRE and Money 3 07-31-2005 10:42 AM
SWR Inflation Adjustment astroboy FIRE and Money 29 01-08-2005 12:18 PM
Update on SS adjustment for ER... That's all? Telly FIRE and Money 29 11-09-2004 09:07 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:40 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.