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Anyone "Start their own business" instead of retiring?
Old 02-04-2015, 03:13 PM   #1
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Anyone "Start their own business" instead of retiring?

I'm curious if any of you have decided to "start your own business" or "go out on your own" instead of telling friend you have retired from the standpoint of not having to explain why you retired early.

Essentially, you have the built in excuse that "you're busy" when you have things you want to do and not be bothered.

Also, you don't have people asking you for money because the thought is that you're essentially still working for a living and within the constraints of what everyone else deals with on a daily life. Meanwhile your new business is one that you "work on" whenever you want.

As I transition to retirement, I can see myself transitioning into doing my own thing and just never really quit that. (of course hopefully with the ability to just deal with projects / clients that I want to deal with when it's convenient).
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Old 02-04-2015, 06:31 PM   #2
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That's what I'm doing. I plan to learn programming and develop mobile apps, but at a pace that happens to be whatever suits me.
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:19 PM   #3
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I joke that I have retired 5 times so far. I've never really decided to 'start' a business since retiring but somehow I have 'fallen into' several things along the way.

After I officially retired at age 43, I discovered that people seem to think that you must know something if you managed to retire early. They then move on to thinking about how they might be able to use what you know to their own advantage somehow. So they offer you jobs etc.

Most don't interest you but sometimes something does. I was living on a Greek island one winter and some local acquaintances kept asking me, 'what are you going to do when the season(tourist season) begins?' I say I was hoping to continue doing more or less nothing. 'Oh, you can't do that' they said, 'You'll spend your time in bars drinking, trying to pick up tourist women, etc. and end up like so many have. Old before your time, dissipated and broke. No, no, you'll have to get a job just to give your life some structure and keep you from overindulging.' I wasn't sure what they saw that was wrong with overindulging but I got tired of them working on me and said, ok, I'll do something.

So I thought about how could I get paid to sit in bar, pick up tourist women and generally overindulge myself. If I was getting paid to do it I figured they'd leave me alone. So I opened a bar with a local partner. The first year was fun, the second year was OK, the third year was getting to be just work and truthfully I was getting tired of the 'overindulging'. So I sold out to my partner at a profit.

I was renting a pretty luxurious(by island standards) apartment and told my landlord that I would need to move out and 'downsize' to save some money as I wouldn't have the supplemental income the bar gave me. He asked me if I knew how to build a garage. I said I probably could but why would I want to? He said, 'I'll let you stay rent free if you spend 3-4 hours a day building one for me.'

From that we moved on to my doing all the drawings for a new 6 unit apartment building he wanted to add to the property. I'm not an architect, but I could wing it. All in all, I ended up rent free for 4 years doing one thing or another for him a few hours a day on weekdays.

At the same time, a friend who owned a bar with a pool table in it asked me if I wanted to earn a little money socializing with his primarily Brit tourists every night. Hmmm, free drinks, pocket money, socialize with people and play pool every night. The only stipulation, I had to let the tourists win on the pool table. It isn't easy to lose without it looking like you lost on purpose you know. It takes real skill.

So I had free rent, free pocket money. All I needed was to buy groceries. Enter the live-in girlfriend. She was an English teacher and she bought the groceries. Financial independence, who needs it?

Living on a Greek island you can probably understand that finding Birthday cards, Christmas Cards, etc. that are in English is not easy to do. One winter, an Australian friend who owned a hotel on the island was having a Birthday Party. So I got a bootleg Desktop Publishing program for my computer and printed a Birthday card for her. She liked it a lot and asked, 'could you print menus for my hotel?'

I reluctantly said, I supposed I could but I figured I'd discourage her and quoted what I thought was a ridiculous number. She ordered 25. Then she showed the finished menus to a guy who owned a restaurant and I got a phone call from him. Before you knew it, I was up to my ears in orders for menus, all through word of mouth.

The only redeeming thing about it is that there is only around a 6 week window just before the tourist season starts when anyone is interested in buying new menus. That and the limitions of just how many you can print out on a printer limit the whole business. I could earn enough in those 6 weeks though (I did it for 3 years) to say buy groceries for a year or something. Instead, I just banked the money and then used it to buy a 1980 Triumph TR7 I found for sale online, in England.

When I went to England to buy the car and drive it back to Greece, I met a woman. Long story short, a year later I was married and living in Scotland.

Decks in backyards were just becoming popular in the UK at that time even though they don't really get the weather to enjoy them that much but hey, they like to fool themselves that they do. I noticed that they used pressure treated boards with grooves on them. http://walestimber.co.uk/images/arbo...kboards_02.jpg

I was curious as to why and phoned a decking company to ask them. I had an interesting conversation with the company owner about it and at the end of that discussion, he asked if I was interested in designing and selling decks for his company. I said I might be but only if it was cash, I wasn't interested in having to get into the whole payroll and taxes bureaucracy. He didn't have a problem with that.

Working about 10-15 hours a week making 5 or 6 sales calls on qualified potential customers I was able to earn enough cash to pay for 2 or 3 vacations of a week or two in other parts of Europe like France and Switzerland. I did that for around 6 years while waiting for my wife to retire. She had too much to lose pension wise to retire when we first got married.

When she retired, we decided to move from the UK to Canada. I have dual citizenship and now so does she.

So my advice dd564, is don't worry about deciding to 'start your own business' when you retire. In my experience, early retirement is like quitting smoking. You have to keep saying, 'No I will not work, no I will not work, no I will not work'. Eve then it doesn't always work out that way.

It's like Alcoholics Anonymous. 'My name is Jack, I'm a workoholic. It's been seven years and 26 days since the last day I worked'.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:03 PM   #4
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Sojourning - great story and that stuff does happen, as long as you are young and smart enough to handle it.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:11 PM   #5
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I joke that I have retired 5 times so far. I've never really decided to 'start' a business since retiring but somehow I have 'fallen into' several things along the way.

After I officially retired at age 43, I discovered that people seem to think that you must know something if you managed to retire early. They then move on to thinking about how they might be able to use what you know to their own advantage somehow. So they offer you jobs etc.

Most don't interest you but sometimes something does. I was living on a Greek island one winter and some local acquaintances kept asking me, 'what are you going to do when the season(tourist season) begins?' I say I was hoping to continue doing more or less nothing. 'Oh, you can't do that' they said, 'You'll spend your time in bars drinking, trying to pick up tourist women, etc. and end up like so many have. Old before your time, dissipated and broke. No, no, you'll have to get a job just to give your life some structure and keep you from overindulging.' I wasn't sure what they saw that was wrong with overindulging but I got tired of them working of me and said, ok, I'll do something.

So I thought about how could I get paid to sit in bar, pick up tourist women and generally overindulge myself. If I was getting paid to do it I figured they'd leave me alone. So I opened a bar with a local partner. The first year was fun, the second year was OK, the third year was getting to be just work and truthfully I was getting tired of the 'overindulging'. So I sold out to my partner at a profit.

I was renting a pretty luxurious(by island standards) apartment and told my landlord that I would need to move out and 'downsize' to save some money as I wouldn't have the supplemental income the bar gave me. He asked me if I knew how to build a garage. I said I probably could but why would I want to? He said, 'I'll let you stay rent free if you spend 3-4 hours a day building one for me.'

From that we moved on to my doing all the drawings for a new 6 unit apartment building he wanted to add to the property. I'm not an architect, but I could wing it. All in all, I ended up rent free for 4 years doing one thing or another for him a few hours a day on weekdays.

At the same time, a friend who owned a bar with a pool table in it asked me if I wanted to earn a little money socializing with his primarily Brit tourists every night. Hmmm, free drinks, pocket money, socialize with people and play pool every night. The only stipulation, I had to let the tourists win on the pool table. It isn't easy to lose without it looking like you lost on purpose you know. It takes real skill.

So I had free rent, free pocket money. All I needed was to buy groceries. Enter the live-in girlfriend. She was an English teacher and she bought the groceries. Financial independence, who needs it?

Living on a Greek island you can probably understand that finding Birthday cards, Christmas Cards, etc. that are in English is not easy to do. One winter, an Australian friend who owned a hotel on the island was having a Birthday Party. So I got a bootleg Desktop Publishing program for my computer and printed a Birthday card for her. She liked it a lot and asked, 'could you print menus for my hotel?'

I reluctantly said, I supposed I could but I figured I'd discourage her and quoted what I thought was a ridiculous number. She ordered 25. Then she showed the finished menus to a guy who owned a restaurant and I got a phone call from him. Before you knew it, I was up to my ears in orders for menus, all through word of mouth.

The only redeeming thing about it is that there is only around a 6 week window just before the tourist season starts when anyone is interested in buying new menus. That and the limitions of just how many you can print out on a printer limit the whole business. I could earn enough in those 6 weeks though (I did it for 3 years) to say buy groceries for a year or something. Instead, I just banked the money and then used it to buy a 1980 Triumph TR7 I found for sale online, in England.

When I went to England to buy the car and drive it back to Greece, I met a woman. Long story short, a year later I was married and living in Scotland.

Decks in backyards were just becoming popular in the UK at that time even though they don't really get the weather to enjoy them that much but hey, they like to fool themselves that they do. I noticed that they used pressure treated boards with grooves on them. http://walestimber.co.uk/images/arbo...kboards_02.jpg

I was curious as to why and phoned a decking company to ask them. I had an interesting conversation with the company owner about it and at the end of that discussion, he asked if I was interested in designing and selling decks for his company. I said I might be but only if it was cash, I wasn't interested in having to get into the whole payroll and taxes bureaucracy. He didn't have a problem with that.

Working about 10-15 hours a week making 5 or 6 sales calls on qualified potential customers I was able to earn enough cash to pay for 2 or 3 vacations of a week or two in other parts of Europe like France and Switzerland. I did that for around 6 years while waiting for my wife to retire. She had too much to lose pension wise to retire when we first got married.

When she retired, we decided to move from the UK to Canada. I have dual citizenship and now so does she.

So my advice dd564, is don't worry about deciding to 'start your own business' when you retire. In my experience, early retirement is like quitting smoking. You have to keep saying, 'No I will not work, no I will not work, no I will not work'. Eve then it doesn't always work out that way.

It's like Alcoholics Anonymous. 'My name is Jack, I'm a workoholic. It's been seven years and 26 days since the last day I worked'.

That's a great story. Love it.


I have a side-business already which I'm not able to spend time on, and I have a rental.

My plan when done working is to phase into contact work and doing work on my own "ventures". Ideally working only as much as I want, vs having to work to make ends meet.
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:16 PM   #6
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Interesting stories. I plan to start a doggie day care in 2 years. Have been wanting to do this for over 10 years. Don't have to make any money at it.....just cover the expenses and provide me with something to do. I can't wait !!!
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:37 PM   #7
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I plan to start a doggie day care in 2 years. Have been wanting to do this for over 10 years. Don't have to make any money at it.....just cover the expenses and provide me with something to do. I can't wait !!!
Based on my experience as a customer in san jose, I think this can be very lucrative. We'd routinely spend $35-50 per day to have someone take care of our pooch (and yes we did shop around).
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:42 PM   #8
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Based on my experience as a customer in san jose, I think this can be very lucrative. We'd routinely spend $35-50 per day to have someone take care of our pooch (and yes we did shop around).
I've thought about this as well. It's like $70-100 here.
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:43 PM   #9
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Absolutely you can make some $ doing it...I have had a business plan for the last 4-5 years...just waiting.....I am just not sure I want to work that hard.....just enough to pay for itself and maybe a little spending $.
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:26 PM   #10
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One of my friends has a small business in an industrial park and a doggie day care center went in to the park in one of the buildings near his. He thought it would be gone in a month or two but business is booming.

We've had a couple of small businesses for years and I will probably always have some hobby type side businesses, though more boring ones than sojourning. It drives my husband crazy. He is more the bridge, hiking and Bocce ball type kind of retiree and I'm always plotting three businesses into the future. Though he does like the part where my business income and retirement plan were part of allowed him to quit his day job.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:09 AM   #11
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Great sharing. Doggie daycare. Cool. Never thought of that one. Where might I find a mock business plan ??
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:16 AM   #12
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Great sharing. Doggie daycare. Cool. Never thought of that one. Where might I find a mock business plan ??

There you go:

Animal Day Care Business Plan Sample - Executive Summary | Bplans

Can I get a mock consulting fee for helping you?
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:01 PM   #13
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There you go:

Animal Day Care Business Plan Sample - Executive Summary | Bplans

Can I get a mock consulting fee for helping you?
When I start making profits, I might need some consulting expenses to offset my income.

You'll have to fly to Minnesota, take me out for a few dinners, a few events, and then I'll pay you the consulting fee.
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Old 02-06-2015, 09:21 PM   #14
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I think the OP is talking about a hypothetical business, not a real one. Something to keep people off his back about being retired so young. So, to answer that question, yes...I am 'unofficially' a consultant. Of course it's in the line of work I did and it doesn't take 40 hours a week, but it's a GREAT excuse for getting out of stuff!

As a matter of fact, I just took a 'business trip' for a few days to visit an old friend in Florida. It was great, and the consulting business is the best cover EVER!

I figured out very quickly that most of my friends just couldn't accept me being fully retired at 40, so my 'side business' makes it not as awkward.

Lately I've been considering going to law school (not to practice law), so that would necessitate me 'closing up shop', but I'd be quite busy so my friends and family wouldn't find it unacceptable.

Oh yes, don't worry about the cost of law school...I would only have to pay for parking and books, so no dipping into my 'stash our taking out any loans. I think it would be a good way to really exercise my brain!

Sent from my mobile device so please excuse grammatical errors.
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Old 02-07-2015, 09:24 AM   #15
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I think the OP is talking about a hypothetical business, not a real one. Something to keep people off his back about being retired so young. So, to answer that question, yes...I am 'unofficially' a consultant. Of course it's in the line of work I did and it doesn't take 40 hours a week, but it's a GREAT excuse for getting out of stuff!

As a matter of fact, I just took a 'business trip' for a few days to visit an old friend in Florida. It was great, and the consulting business is the best cover EVER!

I figured out very quickly that most of my friends just couldn't accept me being fully retired at 40, so my 'side business' makes it not as awkward.

Lately I've been considering going to law school (not to practice law), so that would necessitate me 'closing up shop', but I'd be quite busy so my friends and family wouldn't find it unacceptable.

Oh yes, don't worry about the cost of law school...I would only have to pay for parking and books, so no dipping into my 'stash our taking out any loans. I think it would be a good way to really exercise my brain!

Sent from my mobile device so please excuse grammatical errors.

Yes. This is what I meant from my original post.
I think there would be huge benefit in saying you're a consultant and you have a "few clients" who you work with.

Sure beats people getting all over you about doing nothing even though you're not really doing anything.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:08 AM   #16
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Rereading your OP dd564, I can now see you did not mean what you actually wrote. What you meant was 'has anyone lied about retiring and said you are still working, to avoid having to explain your early retirement to people?' That has nothing to do with 'hypothetical' at all either. So really, what you wanted to discuss was not made clear at all.

I do agree some people will ask questions about your decision to retire early. I experienced it as has FlyBoy obviously. In my case, I left town to travel which was one of my main reasons for wanting to become financially independent in the first place. So for me, I didn't have to deal with family and friends.

But somehow, the idea of having to lie about about it, just doesn't sit right with me. I think if I had stayed around and felt people were being too nosy or whatever I would have given them short shrift and if necessary some near to rude responses. The problem with lying about it is that you may get caught lying. Then what? Then you have to 'justify' having lied?

What is it FlyBoy that bothers you about people commenting on your having retired? What is it that you anticipate bothering you dd564? Why should you find it necessary to lie about it?

I always remember a lesson about 'justification' that I learned after my retirement. I was driving a classic sports car as my daily ride and one day someone asked me 'how come you are driving a car like that?' Before I could answer, the person sitting next to me at the bar said, 'because he can.'

Often, we THINK we have to justify everything including ourselves, to other people. But nowhere that I know of is there a law that says so. Don't lie and don't try to justify yourself to others would be my advice.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:30 AM   #17
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Looking ahead, I think if you create a fictional business, some friends may go looking for evidence that you've actually formed a business.

I think if you start giving excuses, for whatever reason, the invitations will dry up and the friend list will become shorter over time.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:42 AM   #18
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Rereading your OP dd564, I can now see you did not mean what you actually wrote. What you meant was 'has anyone lied about retiring and said you are still working, to avoid having to explain your early retirement to people?' That has nothing to do with 'hypothetical' at all either. So really, what you wanted to discuss was not made clear at all.

I do agree some people will ask questions about your decision to retire early. I experienced it as has FlyBoy obviously. In my case, I left town to travel which was one of my main reasons for wanting to become financially independent in the first place. So for me, I didn't have to deal with family and friends.

But somehow, the idea of having to lie about about it, just doesn't sit right with me. I think if I had stayed around and felt people were being too nosy or whatever I would have given them short shrift and if necessary some near to rude responses. The problem with lying about it is that you may get caught lying. Then what? Then you have to 'justify' having lied?

What is it FlyBoy that bothers you about people commenting on your having retired? What is it that you anticipate bothering you dd564? Why should you find it necessary to lie about it?

I always remember a lesson about 'justification' that I learned after my retirement. I was driving a classic sports car as my daily ride and one day someone asked me 'how come you are driving a car like that?' Before I could answer, the person sitting next to me at the bar said, 'because he can.'

Often, we THINK we have to justify everything including ourselves, to other people. But nowhere that I know of is there a law that says so. Don't lie and don't try to justify yourself to others would be my advice.
I personally have just found it to be easier...It's used moreso with acquaintances and co-workers from years gone by. The folks that are true friends and family know that I'm fully retired and support me in it.

As for looking into my business, well, more power to them. I'm sorry that their life is so empty that they have to try to dig up stuff on me. I'm not very concerned.

Sent from my mobile device so please excuse grammatical errors.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:43 AM   #19
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Lately I've been considering going to law school (not to practice law)
Many of the lawyers I have known absolutely hated law school. But I think that is in part driven by the fact that they were still young and competing with their classmates for a legal job when they graduated. Consequently, they were stressed out the entire time they were there, even aside from the general anxiety that often goes with being in your early 20s and wondering about your place in the world. And if they were going straight from college to law school, they were at the end of a very long road of academic striving and simply getting tired of it.

By contrast, I loved law school. I already had been working for eight years, in the Navy and then as an engineer at a nuclear plant, and it was like a three year vacation for me. I enjoyed the intellectual challenges and the endless debates over law, philosophy and public policy with my fellow students. My work experience, as well as simply being older than the majority of my classmates, led to dramatically lower stress levels than if I had gone to law school straight out of college. For example, I was not afraid that the professor would call on me and I wouldn't know the answer. I thought to myself "what are you going to do? Cut my hair and send me to sea? Sorry, already been done." It also helped that I went to a law school that is famous for attracting people who don't really really want to become practicing lawyers. None of us learned anything about what the law is, but we learned a great deal about what it probably should be. We also did not have any class ranking. I was tied for both first and last in the class, with 174 other people. The only real competition there was to score a Supreme Court or Circuit Court of Appeals clerkship after graduation.
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