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Avoiding a "retirement party"
Old 12-20-2012, 12:20 PM   #1
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Avoiding a "retirement party"

I'm class of 2013. April 1 is the day, which means March 29 is the last work day.

Because we're a relatively small law firm, and I have some nice credentials and certifications, I've agreed they can leave my name on everything and suggested it would be foolish to announce an official retirement. It might affect future business. I think my partners agree with that and find some value in keeping my name associated with the firm.

So how do I avoid them doing a retirement party? Everyone I know who has said they don't want one ends up with one anyway. Maybe you just can't avoid it.

My intention isn't so much to retire as it is to just quit coming to work and to quit getting a paycheck. Retirement sounds like something really old people do!

Oh well. Maybe I'll just sneak out a week or so early.
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Old 12-20-2012, 12:42 PM   #2
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The retired attorneys in my building still 'participate' in their profession for social, if not economic, reasons. Your name will still be around, there won't be an official retirement announcement. Why not hold an 'anniversary' party? You will then have the opportunity to roast your colleagues and they can toast you.
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Old 12-20-2012, 01:22 PM   #3
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If you allow them to use your name as a brand, I think you should use this to negotiate "emeritus" status at the firm. They could make an office space available to you and could call you in to mentor them with very "special" clients only. That would avoid the perception of a complete break and hopefully the party.
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Old 12-20-2012, 02:28 PM   #4
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If you allow them to use your name as a brand, I think you should use this to negotiate "emeritus" status at the firm. They could make an office space available to you and could call you in to mentor them with very "special" clients only. That would avoid the perception of a complete break and hopefully the party.
+1 on Mead's idea.
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Old 12-20-2012, 02:41 PM   #5
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Retirement sounds like something really old people do!
Good grief...

You've been participating on this board for two years and you still think the earth is flat that way? Or is that a reflection of some inner concern about your self-worth once you are "out to pasture"?

Re the retirement party issue, that's a tempest in a teapot, no more than a momentary interruption in the flow of your life. Not worth worrying about.
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Old 12-20-2012, 04:05 PM   #6
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I did not have a retirement party. Nor do I need a "memorial office" at my former employer.

Just retire and get on with it! You won't think about your former workplace after you have been gone a month!
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Old 12-20-2012, 04:21 PM   #7
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I used to associate the term retirement to older folks - my Grandfather retired at 71, my Father 69. All the people I knew that were retired were old... But I got friends that were retired cops, firemen, military etc though various groups I joined and they were in their late forties/early 50s and were having a ball being retired. The retire = expire days are for the most part gone!

Congrats on the pending retirement! Getting out of the party will be tricky - the party is enjoyed by all (hopefully) and therefore often pushed.
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Old 12-20-2012, 07:14 PM   #8
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I told my colleagues I did not want a party, and some of them advised me as follows: A retirement party is like a funeral. It is not so much for the guy retiring as it is for those left behind. It gives them a chance to say their goodbyes and helps them get thru the process of separation.

So, I relented, went to the party, had a few tears, but also had a great time.

My advice: if they want to give you a party, let them, and have a good time, knowing it is at least as much a party for them as it is for you.

FWIW-having had my own two retirement parties within the past 10 days.

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Old 12-20-2012, 07:45 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by 67walkon View Post
I'm class of 2013. April 1 is the day, which means March 29 is the last work day.

Because we're a relatively small law firm, and I have some nice credentials and certifications, I've agreed they can leave my name on everything and suggested it would be foolish to announce an official retirement. It might affect future business. I think my partners agree with that and find some value in keeping my name associated with the firm.

So how do I avoid them doing a retirement party? Everyone I know who has said they don't want one ends up with one anyway. Maybe you just can't avoid it.

My intention isn't so much to retire as it is to just quit coming to work and to quit getting a paycheck. Retirement sounds like something really old people do!

Oh well. Maybe I'll just sneak out a week or so early.
I'm in a similar situation where some of our business would be hampered if I announced a "retirement". I'm pulling the plug March 29th, but will come into the office 1 - 2 days a week, and continue to answer emails, etc.

My colleagues suggested a retirement party. I said I wasn't really retiring, and I wouldn't accept a retirement party. Instead, I emailed a meeting invitation for March 29th at 3:30 at the local Tilted Kilt for some frivolity.

This reasoning could work in your case.
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:58 PM   #10
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Listen here mister.

In my life, someone retiring means that I'm that much closer to my own retirement! That's why I love (and need) retirement parties!
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Old 12-20-2012, 09:08 PM   #11
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Your retirement is just an excuse for everyone else to goof off for a short time. Let them have their party.
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Old 12-20-2012, 09:53 PM   #12
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As someone who almost never attended a good-bye luncheon in my 23 yars of wrking, I declined the invitation to have them hold one for me when I left my company in 2008 to ER. Instead, I went to lunch with my best friend/coworker who treated me to lunch. Later that dy, some of my coworkers gave methe money they would have spent on my luncheon, about $160, which was very nice of them and most unexpected. No regrets.
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:26 AM   #13
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Your retirement is just an excuse for everyone else to goof off for a short time. Let them have their party.
Yeah. I don't know why so many people think of it as a funeral. When I retired, they threw me a cook out at work. We all had a blast for an hour or so and it was back to work for most. Oh yes, they gave me a new golf cart so maybe that is why I enjoyed my party as much as I did.
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Old 12-21-2012, 07:04 AM   #14
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There are lots of reasons to have a celebration. Unless the retirement parties are universally painful, let folks have a moment of work related enjoyment. Give them something to look forward to. If you're thinking about staying connected, saying so when everyone is in the room is a good way to get the message out.
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Old 12-21-2012, 07:13 AM   #15
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There are lots of reasons to have a celebration. Unless the retirement parties are universally painful, let folks have a moment of work related enjoyment. Give them something to look forward to. If you're thinking about staying connected, saying so when everyone is in the room is a good way to get the message out.
I agree with this. In my case, I declined the offer to have a "coffee and cake" deal at our workplace which would have been dreadfully boring and instead sent an email inviting everyone to join me at a bar. We closed down the joint, it was a nice way to go out
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Old 12-21-2012, 07:27 AM   #16
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Maybe they should simply make you a board or advisory board member, and invite you back a few times a year to attend a board meeting (for a fee) and thereby you can avoid the officially retired moniker and party.

I am leaving my company in April too and don't want a party. Although its still months off, someone brought that subject up the other day, wanting to know where my party would be held
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Old 12-21-2012, 08:20 AM   #17
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When I retired from the group that I was with, I asked that there be no party/recognition and that any money/contributions be sent to one of my named charities.

I w*rked with a large group of a couple of hundred people, both in Euroland and the U.S.

I was shocked by the amount of money that was raised (the charity sent me a note, of the amount that was contributed "in my name") - which I attribute to my desire that somebody/organization would benefit rather than myself (and no, I did not take a tax deduction; I'm sure the corporate contribution -which was a match against all personal contributions, and the cost of a party - was deducted from "their side" .)

Anyway, it would have been impossible for everybody to gather at one time (in the middle of "The Pond"?) It worked out quite well, and I was quite pleased with the results. I didn't realize that I was not viewed (at least by most) as a PIA, based upon the contributions made. Maybe they were happy just to see me go ...
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Old 12-21-2012, 09:44 AM   #18
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Interesting thread. I am not a fan of retirement parties at work, or for that matter, any kind of personal gatherings like baby showers or engagement parties (company paid lunches are ok though, since it saves me from having to spend money on a meal ). But then again, I don't view work as something I do for fun, or as a place to make friends. I put in my time in order to receive my paycheck, and I have little desire to do any ancillary stuff. Perhaps I have a negative view of work, and that's probably due to reading books like "Your Money or Your Life" and online sites like this forum.
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Old 12-21-2012, 09:50 AM   #19
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I agree with this. In my case, I declined the offer to have a "coffee and cake" deal at our workplace which would have been dreadfully boring and instead sent an email inviting everyone to join me at a bar. We closed down the joint, it was a nice way to go out
Now that is the right way to go! Good idea, Steel!
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Old 12-21-2012, 01:26 PM   #20
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Good ideas! I've thought that I wouldn't mind giving legal advice to people I like or helping people I like, I just don't want to be tied down to regular hours, overhead, staff and all that. There is too much else to do.

I guess other people can do whatever they want to do and it won't make much difference to me in the long run.
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