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Old 11-27-2017, 10:59 PM   #121
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Originally Posted by brucethebroker View Post
I have seen living rooms (in the traditional homes with both a LR and FR), dens and garages turned into bedrooms to fix the "no bedrooms on first floor" problem. Is that a possibility?
It is. ..and something I think about often. There is still the yard maintenance, house maintenance and snow/ice removal to consider.

On the plus side. We only have two small steps coming in the front and back. The garage entry could easily be modified to have a ramp instead of one step or totally reworked with a garage remodel.

An elderly couple from our church just moved to a local CCRC due to similar issues. They got a cute little ranch cottage that is fully maintained for them.
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Old 11-27-2017, 11:03 PM   #122
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Are the stairs straight or do they have a turn in the middle? If straight a chair elevator can be installed up the stairs to provide access. Although adds I have see suggest that even with a turn the right company can install a stair lift.
As to outside work there are yard services, and between handypersons and cleaning services the inside can be taken care of.
There is a bend with a landing before the final 2 steps at the top. They DO make stair lifts that would handle it, but they are pricey. A friend has an elderly mother and an old house with winding stairs. They got a stair lift.
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Old 11-28-2017, 07:31 AM   #123
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Friends just moved to the mountains. They are in their late 60s and he has heart and other medical problems. They moved because her mother has out-lived her money and has to move from the CCRC. The mother will turn 100 this summer. They have 2 bedrooms on the main floor and a very large lower floor that only the wife will be able to access with muitiple bedrooms and a lot of additional space for guests. They have more kids than I can count and the kids and their families will all gather at the new house to celebrate the mother's birthday. They will be about 40 to 45 minutes from the closest town and small hospital and are quite happy with their new place. - Different strokes for different folks...
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Old 11-28-2017, 08:16 AM   #124
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There are downsides
Ronstar mentioned some of them.

Septic, well, and extra driveway expense
Snow plowing long driveway
Sometime roads are impassable due to snow
Sketchy cell phone coverage
We got lucky, but good Tv/internet may be hard to get
Have to clean leaves out of gutters a lot
Lots of animals eating plants/ flowers
Lots of bugs
Very few restaurants nearby
Tree maintenance - I'm alway sawing down trees or cleaning up branches
More grass to mow
Yard work is tougher on an older body
Good list! We had all of those.
I would add:
Walking the dog is boring, OTOH not necessary
Slow moving half tons casing the joint
No block parties
Walk to get your mail
Every drive requires a list

and we also had the city move to us over 15 years.
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Old 11-28-2017, 08:44 AM   #125
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We recently thought long and hard about it. We decided agaisnt it for several reasons.

-we want to be close to an airport, easy taxi ride
-we need good internet
-proximity to medical and dental services
-proximity to social events, restaurants, etc.

So we made the decision to remain urban. It was the right decision for us.
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Old 11-28-2017, 10:42 AM   #126
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One thing I really long for out here is access to natural gas for heating and cooking. Some rural homeowners have a line running past their homes, but those of us in a really "private" location have to make do with a more expensive fuel. The issue is compounded by the fact that our house is over 100 years old. As a friend in a similar situation commented, "It's like heating a corn crib."

A cruel irony is that the local power utility ran a 30-inch gas main through our property about 15 years ago. They paid us well for the easement, even though I told them they could have the easement for free if they ran service to our house.
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Old 11-28-2017, 12:52 PM   #127
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Originally Posted by brett View Post
We recently thought long and hard about it. We decided agaisnt it for several reasons.

-we want to be close to an airport, easy taxi ride
-we need good internet
-proximity to medical and dental services
-proximity to social events, restaurants, etc.

So we made the decision to remain urban. It was the right decision for us.
Good internet is an absolute necessity for us since I'm "in the business" (IT).

Fortunately, we "think" we have cable - or so Charter tells us. Very long story but we went from thinking the sub was NOT wired and we'd have to use LTE or (ugh) Satellite to finding the construction manager at Charter for the area who insists we can in fact get it, and that the sub is indeed wired. Still have not heard of anyone on our street who actually has it working, though but he was "100% positive" and actually sent one of his line techs onsite to verify..

No cable would pretty much be a deal breaker. I don't care about the TV but the high speed internet is a must in my business (and in general).
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Old 11-28-2017, 12:53 PM   #128
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One thing I really long for out here is access to natural gas for heating and cooking. Some rural homeowners have a line running past their homes, but those of us in a really "private" location have to make do with a more expensive fuel. The issue is compounded by the fact that our house is over 100 years old. As a friend in a similar situation commented, "It's like heating a corn crib."

A cruel irony is that the local power utility ran a 30-inch gas main through our property about 15 years ago. They paid us well for the easement, even though I told them they could have the easement for free if they ran service to our house.
Natural gas would be huge. We'd be on propane, and one of my family members who lived in the area told me the other day he had a SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLAR propane bill his first year. Of course, he also has a barn (kept at 55 degrees) but still..seven thousand?!!!

That's a high price to pay for privacy and (hopefully) peace and quiet..
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Old 11-28-2017, 01:17 PM   #129
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Could it be someone doing flight instruction? that's what it sound like it might be, that's a different thing then airplane traffic.
In addition to the landing pattern traffic that meierlde described, if they're going around in near-perfect circles it could be flight instruction practicing "turns around a point". It's a bit more complicated than simply pointing a wingtip at a specific tree or something because the pilot also has to compensate for the wind to keep the ground track circular, so the angle of bank has to constantly change throughout the turn. To make it easier to see changes in ground track this is often done at a lower-than-normal altitude, say 500 to 1,000 feet.

Either that or they're doing aerial photography surveying where they're going to build the 2,000 home development and 8 million square foot shopping center with apartment buildings....
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Old 11-28-2017, 01:27 PM   #130
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I have been a city person most of my life, and I mean city, not a suburb. When my children were young we moved to the country in a lovely but extremely unhandy situation which became worse as the years went on and I-5 traffic steadily increased.

What I never realized is that unless you are looking for elk and bears on your porch, there are plenty of relaxing and completely satisfactory city or very close in suburban locations. For personal safety as well as comfort and long term trust in the increasing value of your home or condo the big issue is crime. Gentrification decreases crime, but also increases social justice plans to stop these neighborhood changes. You do not want crime, it is one of the things that can really sink one's happiness and security in a big way. The hangup, if there is one, is cost. City homes in quality neighborhoods in growing cities are definitely uncheap.

Late yesterday afternoon I walked down to to the Central Library to pick up a book. Then on to the Public Market for some food. I found a book for $1 by Alberto Moravia, one of my favorite authors, Then some grilled ahi tuna while I watched the light rain fall beyond the open stall. I suddenly felt very happy. When I got home I had clocked a total of 10 miles on my Fitbit, and I still felt fresh because I really can't think of anything that I would rather be doing. I remembered when I first came up here from LA to visit is 1966. I stayed with a friend in the U District, and we got up to go out for breakfast in a light rain. That felt good, and it still does to me, though I feel sure that there are plenty others who would be less enthralled.

Ha
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Old 11-28-2017, 02:06 PM   #131
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In addition to the landing pattern traffic that meierlde described, if they're going around in near-perfect circles it could be flight instruction practicing "turns around a point". It's a bit more complicated than simply pointing a wingtip at a specific tree or something because the pilot also has to compensate for the wind to keep the ground track circular, so the angle of bank has to constantly change throughout the turn. To make it easier to see changes in ground track this is often done at a lower-than-normal altitude, say 500 to 1,000 feet.

Either that or they're doing aerial photography surveying where they're going to build the 2,000 home development and 8 million square foot shopping center with apartment buildings....
Agreed..I think it's flight training. There's a small airport nearby and when I googled them, the first image that comes up is their entrance with the standard signage and a "Learn to Fly!" sign right next to it..but then again..how many people want to "learn to fly"?

Either that or some local has a small plane that he likes to drive around in circles in..

I don't mind if an occasional plane flies overhead actually going somewhere..but to hear them buzzing around overhead for hours at a time going in circles..well, that's annoying.
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Old 11-28-2017, 02:09 PM   #132
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Natural gas would be huge. We'd be on propane, and one of my family members who lived in the area told me the other day he had a SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLAR propane bill his first year. Of course, he also has a barn (kept at 55 degrees) but still..seven thousand?!!!

That's a high price to pay for privacy and (hopefully) peace and quiet..
I have paid $1250 for propane this year after filling up the tanks last Dec 28 and I just had them filled last a couple of weeks ago. That includes a 2000+ square foot house with no drywall, no ceilings, and no insulation last winter. It also includes an old 34 foot motor home. I live at 8700 ft in Colorado. I did not want anything freezing last winter so the partially installed furnace kept the basement at 55 degrees and the upstairs somewhat colder. This year the walls have 1.5 inches of foam so it will be quite a bit cheaper. When the house is finished I will mostly heat with a wood stove. Propane should be a couple hundred a year or less. Wood is free if you cut up what falls down or needs to be taken down on that much acreage.
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Old 11-28-2017, 02:30 PM   #133
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Natural gas would be huge. We'd be on propane, and one of my family members who lived in the area told me the other day he had a SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLAR propane bill his first year. Of course, he also has a barn (kept at 55 degrees) but still..seven thousand?!!!

That's a high price to pay for privacy and (hopefully) peace and quiet..
How is that possible? I heated a 1000 square foot house on the Canadian prairies last year for $400 (natural gas). That $400 includes $150 of fixed charges. Even the people I know with 3000 square foot houses rarely spend more than $1200 - $1500 for an entire year.
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Old 11-28-2017, 02:32 PM   #134
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How is that possible?
My guess is somebody forgot to close the barn door...
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Old 11-28-2017, 02:51 PM   #135
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Is his barn like this?

How do you heat a cavernous barn without having all that precious heat going up to the roof?

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Old 11-28-2017, 02:55 PM   #136
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Is his barn like this?

How do you heat a cavernous barn without having all that precious heat going up to the roof?

I don't know and I've been in many barns, never did see much insulation.
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Old 11-28-2017, 03:30 PM   #137
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Actually in the barn on my grandfathers farm (now demolished) built before 1900 there was a central area for hay etc as well as parking a wagon, and smaller rooms for horses and cows. The horse and cow areas were small enough that the animals were enough to keep the room at least somewhat warm in S Indiana.
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Old 11-28-2017, 04:09 PM   #138
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How is that possible? I heated a 1000 square foot house on the Canadian prairies last year for $400 (natural gas). That $400 includes $150 of fixed charges. Even the people I know with 3000 square foot houses rarely spend more than $1200 - $1500 for an entire year.
Not sure, but he's a pretty educated and detail-level guy, so if he says it was $7K I believe him..

He did say propane was more than 2X the cost it is now at the time..and he didn't get crazy about keeping the temp low. He sure does now. That, and he added a wood burning stove.
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Old 11-28-2017, 04:33 PM   #139
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At the height of the energy crunch in 2008, fuel oil in my area was $4/gallon. That year we spent about $3000 to heat our 2400-square-foot house. We eventually installed a wood-pellet boiler and cut our heat bill in half.

We could conceivably heat with cordwood for much less, but wood is a pain. You really should have a couple seasons' worth drying out -- green wood produces creosote, which can coat the chimney and increase the risk of a chimney fire (a few of our neighbors burn their houses down every winter). Creosote is also acidic , which can corrode the stove. A lot of those lovely outdoor wood boilers on rural homesites puffing out clouds of smoke are burning green wood -- and who knows what else.

When I was a teen we heated the house with wood. Fortunately, a nearby town had a furniture factory that was happy to dump their kiln-dried hardwood scraps at our place for next to nothing. We were in clover until the Arab oil embargo caused the factory folks to consider how many valuable BTUs they were giving away.
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Old 11-28-2017, 05:01 PM   #140
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We had propane the first few years. Very expensive - can't remember the exact amount - probably around $1500 -$2000 a winter in the mid 1990's. Then gas mains were installed on our street and I paid $1400 to connect. Well worth it.
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