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Old 11-14-2011, 12:06 PM   #21
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Freebird, You and me are in upstate NY, so here's my question. I apologize for a brief departure from the OP's question.

You used the word tumbleweed.

That is a word from my growing up years in the sand of the suburbs of a city in upstate NY. We called it the Sand Hill. In the winter, we tried to get to US route 20 at the bottom, in our toboggan, but never made it. For the other 3 seasons we chased tumbleweeds, these big things that rolled in the sand. (We played baseball and kick the can too.)

Tumbleweeds in your message and seeing you are in NY, well, that's why I asked.

Tumbleweeds inside is nothing like those big things in the sand!!

Kate
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:09 PM   #22
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Ferco, do you have any kids or grandkids in the 9 to 12 range?

The money is in the product, the wood flooring, not the work. You and a kid can install them yourselves on a weekend.

There seems something odd in the money, so if it was me, I'd keep looking to price the product.
Maybe we are thinking of two different things. Perhaps there is some leggo like flooring out there. Some floors are glued in.

If you are talking about 3/4" hardwood tongue and groove flooring that is installed with nails...
I would like to see a kid or most adults hammer in 2 inch nails into the base of the tongue of each oak plank on a 45 degree angle and then counter sink them flush (without crying). You need to do this against the walls where the nail gun cannot reach.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:14 PM   #23
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Freebird, You and me are in upstate NY, so here's my question. I apologize for a brief departure from the OP's question.

You used the word tumbleweed.

That is a word from my growing up years in the sand of the suburbs of a city in upstate NY. We called it the Sand Hill. In the winter, we tried to get to US route 20 at the bottom, in our toboggan, but never made it. For the other 3 seasons we chased tumbleweeds, these big things that rolled in the sand. (We played baseball and kick the can too.)

Tumbleweeds in your message and seeing you are in NY, well, that's why I asked.

Tumbleweeds inside is nothing like those big things in the sand!!

Kate
As a former NYer, I never associated tumbleweeds with NYS, leaves yes, tumbleweeds no, but I suppose some areas may be different. Living in the southwest, definitely.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:19 PM   #24
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The tumbleweeds in my experience were big and round and rolled in the sand (open space) and wind. Guessing they could have picked up other things......

The road they called Rt 20 was a dirt road before it became Rt 20, Mom said.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:22 PM   #25
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P.s. I think I got the wood and put it in place, and he nailed.


It wasn't hard. You'd have to ask Dad why not.

Dad planned to be an architect, but became a lawyer. I forgot why.

(and he didn't use a nail gun. He said Kat, this nail has to go there, or something like that, explaining while he nailed.)

It's still beautiful 30 years later.

Mom and Dad are still there.

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Maybe we are thinking of two different things. Perhaps there is some leggo like flooring out there. Some floors are glued in.

If you are talking about 3/4" hardwood tongue and groove flooring that is installed with nails...
I would like to see a kid or most adults hammer in 2 inch nails into the base of the tongue of each oak plank on a 45 degree angle and then counter sink them flush (without crying). You need to do this against the walls where the nail gun cannot reach.
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Old 11-14-2011, 01:37 PM   #26
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P.s. I think I got the wood and put it in place, and he nailed.


It wasn't hard. You'd have to ask Dad why not.

Dad planned to be an architect, but became a lawyer. I forgot why.

(and he didn't use a nail gun. He said Kat, this nail has to go there, or something like that, explaining while he nailed.)

It's still beautiful 30 years later.

Mom and Dad are still there.
I figured I was missing a few essential details. Now I see.
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Old 11-14-2011, 01:40 PM   #27
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Freebird, You and me are in upstate NY, so here's my question. I apologize for a brief departure from the OP's question.

You used the word tumbleweed.

Kate
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Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
As a former NYer, I never associated tumbleweeds with NYS, leaves yes, tumbleweeds no, but I suppose some areas may be different. Living in the southwest, definitely.
I was referring to the small collections of dog hair (they do look like miniature tumbleweeds) that naturally form along the base of the walls where the hardwood floor meets the baseboard trim. My guess is the slight air currents created by walking down the hall pushes the hair to the sides where it collects in bunches.

A real tumbleweed is a desert region pheonenom. Any spaghetti Western of note always had good tumbleweed footage.

End of hijack.
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Old 11-14-2011, 01:41 PM   #28
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P.s. I think I got the wood and put it in place, and he nailed.


It wasn't hard. You'd have to ask Dad why not.

Dad planned to be an architect, but became a lawyer. I forgot why.

(and he didn't use a nail gun. He said Kat, this nail has to go there, or something like that, explaining while he nailed.)

It's still beautiful 30 years later.

Mom and Dad are still there.
As the wife of a retired architect your Dad is a wise man.

Three years ago my husband installed a prefinished wood floor in a room converted from a loft in our former (wood frame) home. He used a beefy plywood as underlayment. We already had the necessary saw in the garage. He purchased a nail gun designed specifically for wood flooring. Those nail guns have increased in quality and reliability of late. It saved his back and knees and the result was beautiful.
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Old 11-14-2011, 11:19 PM   #29
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We just installed 500 square feet of pergo in our house....lot of work and achy knees!!! If you can afford to get it done, do so I would go with a Home Depot/Lowe's....independant contractors can be dicy....definitely ask for references and go see the end product if you can.
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Old 11-15-2011, 08:33 AM   #30
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The price is in line. That is a project you can do yourself if you have the tools, the back and the knees. It is not easy work if you have not done it before but can certainly be done. DW, the Kids and I put done over 2000 ft of the pre-finished board this year at the lake house. If you can get at least there people working on it that will help.

Just for clarification this was the 3/4in solid wood. Red oak. IT just had a factory finish they say is harder than what can be put down as it is baked on. It does make putting it down harder since you have to blend the wood as you install it but it looks good!
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Old 11-15-2011, 09:52 PM   #31
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I strongly recommend you find a good, professional installer.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:27 PM   #32
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Can't say if the price is high or not. Need to know more about the hardwood. What species? What width(s)? What thickness? What finish? All these contribute to the final cost.

My approach was to visit the wholesaler and get their recommendation on products and a good installer. I wound up going with a pre-finished 3/4" light oak with several coats of a hard silica overcoat. These finishes are performed in a dust free environment that can't be duplicated on the job. Another advantage to prefinished product is that once the final nail is driven - you can walk on it right away.

I chose widths in a 3", 4", 5" repeating pattern. Job was done about 5 years ago and still looks great. Best recommendation - go with 3/4" thick product 3" wide minimum. Buy from the wholesaler. Negotiate with the installer. Get a good one. Doors and door jambs will probably need to be cut down. Baseboard should be removed and set on top of the new floor! If your baseboard is beat - replace it. Then shoe (not quarter round) installed. Remember, the floor will look great, nasty old trim will detract. Its straightforward and especially now-a-days doesn't have to be expensive.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:40 PM   #33
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Pic from the newly completed and self installed pine floor. 3 1/8 inch planks unfinished were purchased from Lumber Liquidator. Took more wood than I thought due to 10-20% "wastage" in addition to th 5%+ that you normally loose to cutting and fitting. The floor was finished with three coats of quick drying polyurethane. I hope it is able to survive "dog wear" but somehow I doubt it.
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