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Old 09-10-2012, 05:40 PM   #21
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Based on my Father and Mother, grandparents and aunts/ uncles, I think 75 is going to be about the extent of my years. Only one of this group made it past 80, a few are still trying but it does not look good for them.

Hope to stay active and vital as long as possible, would like to end it quick and not sitting around in a nursing home, but let's face it the end game is almost always ugly- live now.
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Old 09-10-2012, 05:40 PM   #22
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Towards the end of the year that my late wife died, (2002), I met an old guy in Lake Havasu, AZ; he was 90, looked 20 years younger, and had just buried his 3rd wife.
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Old 09-10-2012, 05:56 PM   #23
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Love to hear about the oldsters living great lives- gives me hope. To answer the question of the thread, I am planning on being active until 75, then slowing down (hopefully not all the way down) and am planning for that in my financial calculations.
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Old 09-10-2012, 06:38 PM   #24
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It's the anecdotal evidence that gives us hope. Or at least it feels good to me.

My mom made it to 96 (just died recently). Her outlook was interesting. When she was in her 80s, she said "My father lived to 96, so I expect that I will do the same." Sure enough, that's exactly what happened.

Her father (my GF) was fairly active up until he was 95, then he had a declining year and let go.

My mom was nearly as good; she was fairly active until she hit about 91, still reasonably independent in a retirement community until 94, then went to an assisted living facility and declined.

I'm in much better shape at my age (late 60s) than either of them was at the same age, so I expect I'll make it to my 90s as well.

When we took a week-long Grand Canyon rafting trip a couple of years ago, there was a guy in our group who was 83, and he was as fit as many in their 30s. He did all the hikes up steep vertical climbs up the canyon walls, leaving most of the group behind in his dust. He commented that he ran between 5 and 10 miles most mornings, in the hills near his home in Arizona.

A good friend who is 86 is still doing fine woodworking, and traveling around to various shows of his work at galleries all over the west coast.

I freely grant that these people are out there on the tail of the population curve, and not representative of the general population, but they are inspiring, and that's what counts for me.
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Old 09-10-2012, 06:41 PM   #25
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Quote:
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Towards the end of the year that my late wife died, (2002), I met an old guy in Lake Havasu, AZ; he was 90, looked 20 years younger, and had just buried his 3rd wife.
While I don't doubt your story, the chart I posted shows that only around 5-6% of the population can expect to live to be 90, let alone be 90, and in good health.

What a lucky guy. He won the Lottery.
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:45 PM   #26
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I don't know that you can have expectations or really know. I can say what I've seen with other which is a mixed bag.

I'm adopted so most of the relatives aren't genetically related to me:

My mother -- 88, still drives, OK mentally although she is starting to get more confused and forget things. On the negative she has diabetes and heart failure. On the positive when she was in her mid-70s she had a very difficult heart surgery (quite often fatal) but the surgery was quite successful. Without it she would have died quickly. She has clearly slowed but lives independently.

My dad -- died at 75. Unlike my mom, he was very active and was still riding a bicycle in his mid-70s doing a lot of work in the yard, etc. But you can't really escape 60 years of smoking so he died from lung cancer

Their parents -- Paternal grandmother in her 60s I guess when she died of cancer, grandfather died in his 90s. Maternal grandfather died in mid-60s, grandmother was 89.

My mother's siblings -- Brother died at around 90, oldest sister was in her early 90s and was in poor health for years before dying (2 leg amputations negatively affected quality of life). One sister died in 50s from cancer. My mothers's twin younger sisters are living on their own, still driving, etc. in their mid-80s.

The widower of my mom's oldest sister is around 95 or 96 now, still driving, mentally sharp and living on his own.

On the other hand, DH's father died in his mid-70s from a sudden heart attack. He was active right up until the moment that he had the heart attack (he had a long history of heart disease). DH's mother started having strokes in her late 70s and spent her last several years in a nursing home. She had been very active until the strokes and did not have good quality of life the last 5 or 6 years.

My biological mother - mid-80s now, good health, active, all there mentally but a smoker so who knows how long it will last.
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:54 PM   #27
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I agree with my favorite boss at MegaCorp. He always said that he did not know how long he had to live, but that it was not as long as it used to be.

He died many years ago and I didn't realize he was my favorite boss until years later.
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:55 PM   #28
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Who knows? My parents live independently and drive at ages 87 and 91. Yet my younger sister died suddenly at 55 from cancer.
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Old 09-10-2012, 08:27 PM   #29
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Somewhat chicken and egg, but I plan to be active as long as I'm healthy... Certainly, genetically, eighty something is not unreasonable.
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Old 09-10-2012, 11:12 PM   #30
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I hope to be active and independent until at least 80. My dad was able to drive, be independent, etc until about 84. Then he didn't want ti drive anymore. My mom got Alzheimer's at 80, so that greatly complicated their lives. It's something you just can't predict. My grandmother was in fabulous shape until her mid 90's, so you just never know.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:30 AM   #31
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While I'm not expecting it, I'm making contingecy plans for a long time. I have several family members in the preceding 3 generations who were still in fine shape in their upper 90's and a couple who passed the century mark in good shape. Only a few went in their 60's and 70's.

In my early 60's now and have no health issues yet.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:39 AM   #32
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This reminds me of one of my favorite sayings "doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't". Its a mixed bag in my family, but aside from how relatives have faired, I would hope to be active into my 80s.
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:03 AM   #33
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So that leads me to my question...how long do you plan on having an active and independent life? In your experience, how long did your family members or friends live while still being active and independent? If the average life expectancy is 80, I'm sure the average active life expectancy is less than that.
My plan is a long life, active to the end.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:00 PM   #34
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So that leads me to my question...how long do you plan on having an active and independent life? In your experience, how long did your family members or friends live while still being active and independent? If the average life expectancy is 80, I'm sure the average active life expectancy is less than that.
I'd be curious what the OP learned?
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:54 PM   #35
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Here is a great recent article from NYT fitness blog on this very question.

The Benefits of Middle-Age Fitness - NYTimes.com

Bottom line is that keeping fit is not likely to extend your life by much, but it will significantly shorten the amount of time you have to live with a debilitating condition, if you have or develop one.

"Typically, the most aerobically fit people lived with chronic illnesses in the final five years of their lives, instead of the final 10, 15 or even 20 years."

So, get out and take that walk, ride that bike, hop on the eliptical, go for a swim.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:59 PM   #36
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Ay, there's the rub.... But that's also a major motivation for my ER goal. Being physically active is a very important part of my life, so a significant part of my planned retirement time will be devoted to exercise. In a variation of the checken-egg scenario mentioned earlier, being active likely extends the time one can be...active.
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Old 09-11-2012, 02:54 PM   #37
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Here is a great recent article from NYT fitness blog on this very question.

The Benefits of Middle-Age Fitness - NYTimes.com

Bottom line is that keeping fit is not likely to extend your life by much, but it will significantly shorten the amount of time you have to live with a debilitating condition, if you have or develop one.

"Typically, the most aerobically fit people lived with chronic illnesses in the final five years of their lives, instead of the final 10, 15 or even 20 years."

So, get out and take that walk, ride that bike, hop on the eliptical, go for a swim.
Being aerobically fit is important, but so is "strength" training, as muscle mass and strength tend to fall off naturally. A number I've seen quoted is 3-5%/decade...

Sarcopenia (Muscle Loss With Aging): Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments
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Old 09-11-2012, 03:07 PM   #38
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I intend to keep on kicking until I kick the bucket.

So far I outlived my father, my brother. By 14 years each. Mother made it to 72.
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Old 09-11-2012, 03:22 PM   #39
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My plan is a long life, active to the end.
That's the plan, but who knows...........
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Old 09-11-2012, 03:55 PM   #40
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Based on family history I am expecting to be active till 90, with problems increasing rapidly from then on. Of course I am hoping that I got lucky with genetics compared to my grandparents and that I am successfully living a more active and healthy lifestyle so that that will turn out to be an underestimate of how long I am active.
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