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Old 09-11-2012, 05:15 PM   #41
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Stats for my family are all over the place with a few reaching a healthy old age (80's and 90's) and a others dying in their 50's, 60's and 70's. No one disease seems to be prevalent across the generations.

As I am 58 and healthy (no meds), I am hopeful that I can stay active (travel, gym, walking, cycling, doing my own household chores) to 75 or 80. My LDL cholesterol was running a little high even while all the other blood work numbers were good. My doc ordered a VAP test and pronounced the results "very good" so I guess I dodged the statin bullet for now at least.

I don't see my PCP much, but I seem to have acquired a stable of medical specialists for routine annual check ups: dermatologist, opthalmologist, gynecologist, cardiologist (gastroenterologist now every 5 years).

I sure would not be averse to hiring in-home help if I needed it in future. I have also seen some assisted living places that would be fine with me in my dotage provided I could have my own room.

Oops: Forgot I have (or had) low Vit-D levels and I take 2000 units of OTC Vit. D-3 daily.
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:19 AM   #42
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I'm hoping to be "very active" into my mid to late 70s (jogging, biking, camping/RVing traveling, gardening), and slowing down to just "active" somewhere around the late 70s (less or no jogging, but still lots of walking, an occasional camping trip, but probably with one of our children, and a smaller garden). As far as "independent" goes, I hope to be able to care for myself until perhaps just a few final months. I really don't want to hang on much beyond my "sell by" date....oops, maybe it's too late already...

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Old 09-12-2012, 12:34 AM   #43
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There's the old joke "I'd rather die quietly in my sleep like my GF, not screaming in terror like his passengers".

Then there's DD's take on it "you'd better be nice too me now, after all I get to pick your nursing home".

I'm not sure your driving style can affect your mileage, but YMMV.
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:57 AM   #44
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Being aerobically fit is important, but so is "strength" training, as muscle mass and strength tend to fall off naturally. A number I've seen quoted is 3-5%/decade...

Sarcopenia (Muscle Loss With Aging): Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments
I also believe strength training and some other forms of exercise will help mitigate the loss of bone density which occurs through age.
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:50 PM   #45
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Everyone in my family has had heart attacks and bypass surgery in their mid 50s. I figure I have about 14 years until that first heart attack at 55, but if I live through that I have the next hurdle at 62 (my dad's 2nd quadruple bypass), and if I make it past that maybe I will be like he is now (80 and still playing 18 holes of golf 3 days a week).

Of course they all smoked and I have never smoked, but I figure the big one is still waiting there for me in 14 years like a troll under a bridge.
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Old 09-13-2012, 06:22 PM   #46
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My mother was the poster child for unhealthy living. She drank 10 beers a day, smoked 3 packs of cigarettes, was severely anorexic (79 lbs.) and the only exercise she got was pushing the buttons on the remote control. She lived to age 83. Some of her sisters, who had healthier lifestyles, lived into their 90s.

My father passed away from cancer at age 57 but his father lived to 96.

So, it's a toss up. The way people drive here in Vancouver, I'm lucky if I survive the commute home.
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Old 09-13-2012, 06:29 PM   #47
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As I get older and face my mortality this question has taken on substance. A few years ago I read "Younger Next Year" and was taken with the concept that to a significant degree (but not to certainty) we could stack the deck in favor of leading an active life style into our elder years and then fall off the cliff rather rapidly and die. That seems the ideal way to go. I have exercised for years but never took it very seriously. But after YNY, and later, "Body by Science" I began paying closer attention to both resistance training and cycling. The T-Al's and other people's posts on low carb got me reading and I changed my diet, dropping 30 pounds to my college weight and dumping statins. I now regularly follow several health related blogs to get competing sides of the nutrition wars. I have no problem with the clock running out in my mid 80s, which seems to be my family predisposition. But my hope is that I can extend the healthy, active portion of my life.

I wish I had paid a bit more attention to diet in my 30, 40s, and 50s but better late than never.
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Old 09-13-2012, 06:32 PM   #48
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Everyone in my family has had heart attacks and bypass surgery in their mid 50s. I figure I have about 14 years until that first heart attack at 55, but if I live through that I have the next hurdle at 62 (my dad's 2nd quadruple bypass), and if I make it past that maybe I will be like he is now (80 and still playing 18 holes of golf 3 days a week).

Of course they all smoked and I have never smoked, but I figure the big one is still waiting there for me in 14 years like a troll under a bridge.
My father had 5 brothers...he lived the longest...died at 67. Strokes, etc.

I'll be 70, two weeks from today......feel great, but who knows?
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Old 09-16-2012, 05:41 PM   #49
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Anything over 80 doesnt look too appealing to me. I'll probably be done by then.
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Old 09-16-2012, 05:50 PM   #50
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Well, having an active and independent life not an on/off, black or white sort of thing. One's activity level and health gradually decline, at least in my family.
+1

Barring a stroke, major heart attack or other sudden onset of a serious illness, a gradual decline is how many (most?) play out their final years. Trying to predict the age you will cease to have an active and independent life is like trying to time the market - many think they can, but few get it right.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:24 PM   #51
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Anything over 80 doesnt look too appealing to me. I'll probably be done by then.

You may be surprised. Two of my grandparents were still travelling internationally and highly active until shortly before their deaths in their early/mid '80s. They were both heavy smokers. With a healthier lifestyle and improvements in medicine, I hope to do better. Who knows? But I'm not planning on slowing down until I am forced to.
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:31 PM   #52
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I think that there are so many variables which makes it so difficult to plan. If we knew when it's our time to meet our maker, planning would be so much easier. Yet, that'll take the fun out of the unknown.

Variables like genetics (parents and sibling didn't live past 75), advances in medicine and care (who knows what discoveries are ahead in the next decade or so) and just plain good or bad luck.
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Old 09-18-2012, 10:37 PM   #53
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I want to live to at least 95 (almost 40 more years).

Dad died early at 78 from cancer -- he spent all day, every day at the smoke-filled VFW. His father lived to 101 and his granddad lived to 114. His big brother is 95 and going strong: driving, collecting rent, waiting on his ailing 2nd wife who is 89.

Mom is 86 and doing well. Her parents died early -- late 70s but her grandma lived to 99.
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Old 09-18-2012, 10:40 PM   #54
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Don't think I want to make 114. My GM told me being 97 wasn't that great, "all your friends have been dead for 20 years".
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:41 AM   #55
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+1

Barring a stroke, major heart attack or other sudden onset of a serious illness, a gradual decline is how many (most?) play out their final years. Trying to predict the age you will cease to have an active and independent life is like trying to time the market - many think they can, but few get it right.
The difficult part seems to be how to pull off a planned exit once physical and/or mental deterioration has set in.
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:27 AM   #56
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Barring any visual deficiencies or life threatening illnesses, I hope to do the following:-
1. travel regularly (longhauls and shorthauls) till I am 70 and then cutting down to only to shorthaul trips twice a year thereafter.
2. jog till I am 65 and then slowing down to a brisk walk thereafter.
3. Golf till I die - gradually reducing from 18 holes to whatever physically possible.
4. Manage my own financial investments and expenses until my brain cells stop functioning.
5. Eat and drink merrily till I die unless my digestive system refuses to co-operate.
6. Cook and manage home activities until I am bedridden.
7. Still maintain my email, FB accounts and participate in forums like these till I die or until arthritis set in.

Dad passed away aged mid eighties and only needed help in his last 2 years of life. Mum is in her eighties and still living independently and travelling. Hopefully, that's a good numerical indication for me.
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Old 09-20-2012, 09:08 AM   #57
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My Mom is 96 and still living semi independently .My Dad died at 69 & my Brother died at 50 so who knows . My Mom has no health problems except HBP , arthritis & general aging . I have severe asthma so I really do not think I'll make it to 96 . Hopefully I will hang around to watch my grandchildren grow .
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Old 09-20-2012, 09:14 AM   #58
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Just after my late wife died, (didn't even make 52), and before my Border Collie died, I used to encounter a lady, aged 90, who'd walk an hour each day..........we'd chat for a moment and head off in opposite directions......I'd look back and she'd already be 3 blocks away!

Don't live in the same city now, so don't know what became of her.
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Old 09-20-2012, 11:57 AM   #59
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I'm shooting for 85. My dad was playing golf until 83. He's still driving at 90, although minor decision making is now troublesome for him. The mental decline scares me most.

I ride my bike every morning at dawn, and like clockwork, I pass a retired couple going in the opposite direction. They are in their mid 80s.

This weekend I'll be doing a mountain hike with a group. 7 miles out, and 1 mile altitude gain. Most in the group are 65 to 70. Our oldest member just turned 80. We're going to celebrate with him.
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:19 PM   #60
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Everyone in my family has had heart attacks and bypass surgery in their mid 50s. I figure I have about 14 years until that first heart attack at 55, but if I live through that I have the next hurdle at 62 (my dad's 2nd quadruple bypass), and if I make it past that maybe I will be like he is now (80 and still playing 18 holes of golf 3 days a week).

Of course they all smoked and I have never smoked, but I figure the big one is still waiting there for me in 14 years like a troll under a bridge.
I retired at 54 1/2, and one of the reasons I did so (besides being satisfied about the financial part) is that most of my male relatives (uncles, dad, etc) either died or declined rapidly by about age 60 (some from heart disease, some from other things). Excessive smoking and drinking probably had a lot to do with that, but even so, longevity is not common among the male members of my family. Heart disease is not invevitable, though, even if you have a strong family history of it. You might want to read this series of articles by Chris Kresser (who really knows his stuff) about heart disease, and how to prevent it. Heart Disease / Cholesterol
I have generally been following his recommendations (for the last 3 years or so, anyway), and my blood test markers and blood pressure have all improved, my weight has come down, and I feel great, at age 57 1/2. I told my wife that, since I retired 2 1/2 years ago, my "new" job is to take care of my health, and I am very serious about doing that. During most of my working years, I admit that I did not think much about taking care of my health, but I definitely do now. You seem to have your finances well in order for your age (based on the other thread you posted), so if you now direct some of that attention toward maintaining your health, as I did, I think you will have a long, prosperous retirement!
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