Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-06-2015, 12:40 AM   #21
Recycles dryer sheets
Focus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whisper66 View Post
I do keep in contact with a few of the people from work and enjoy hearing / discussing what is going on there but no interest in returning to work.
Interesting. I've made it a point not to talk about the goings-on at company with the couple of people I've stayed in touch with.
__________________

__________________
-
"Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants."
--Epictetus
Focus is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-06-2015, 05:58 PM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 406
It's early but I suspect most will be moving on. I do already have a lunch date with one of my old coworkers and that might be something that becomes more of friends over time but we will see since I am older than most of them and time has a way of generating gaps
__________________

__________________
If money is the root of all evil I want to be a bad man
nuke_diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2015, 10:12 PM   #23
Full time employment: Posting here.
Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 782
I was pretty close to my direct report managers. There were changes coming down from senior leadership. I stayed long enough to do performance reviews and try to position some folks for the changes before I left. It has been 8 months. They took me to lunch for my birthday and they send me occasional messages about missing me, but they are moving on as am I.
Life moves on


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
"Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" - Mary Oliver
Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 08:11 AM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Car-Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Citizen of Texas
Posts: 2,483
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodi View Post
Letting go of the job was instantaneous. Letting go of the people - I'm still in touch with a few... the friendship ran deeper than the day to day interaction that formed the surface friendship of most coworkers. Letting go of the boss/politics - very easy.

Letting go of the daily commute was lifechanging.
+1
I still keep in touch with a "few" past co-workers but after 3 years of retirement, the frequency of the contacts has turned into very infrequent. Usually when I hear from those that are still working, it's to tell me about someone retiring.

The two things I can't believe I put up with for almost 40 years was the ~40 mile round trip daily commute into downtown Houston and the endless office politics.
__________________
Car-Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 08:29 AM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,629
"Letting go" seems to be very individualized. Some never really do, like those who love what they did but leave the j#b because of the political hassles. One of my close relatives was a chemist who started his own small consulting business after he retired (not early, FWIW). It was his way of keeping the "fun" part of his science while ditching the politics. Others walk out the door and never look back.

It's all part of life...gotta find your own path.
__________________
ERhoosier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 09:54 AM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Mulligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,382
Oddly enough for me, after five years of being retired, the only person I maintain a regular relationship from work is a guy as his boss I challenged him to a fist fight in the office. I was his boss, and he could infuriate me! With work out of the way, common interests started showing through.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Mulligan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 10:08 AM   #27
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,375
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERhoosier View Post
"Letting go" seems to be very individualized. Some never really do, like those who love what they did but leave the j#b because of the political hassles. One of my close relatives was a chemist who started his own small consulting business after he retired (not early, FWIW). It was his way of keeping the "fun" part of his science while ditching the politics. Others walk out the door and never look back.

It's all part of life...gotta find your own path.
So true. Turning in my credit card and office keys to my boss's inbox, all alone on my last day late in the evening as I finished up, was one of the most exhiliarating moments of my life. Picking DH up at his office after his last day, as he carted a box of stuff to the car, ditto. There was so much ahead of us, both expected and surprises, that looking back would have been so distracting.
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 10:22 AM   #28
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,356
It was easier letting go than I expected. I gave 18 months notice, and trained my replacement and assistant to handle everything. It was an easy transition because I worked with them on all of my projects for the last year of work. My last day was hectic and I didn't clean out my desk. It's still there vacant and I sit there for a few minutes whenever I visit. It's fun to visit my former coworkers every couple of months, but I have no desire to go back to work.


Sent from my iPhone (:.using Early Retirement .//82339)
__________________
Ronstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 11:20 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
I have been retired for about 5 months now. As a military guy, I am used to w*rk relationships coming and going. Even when you are on the road with folks for weeks at a time and friendships form when I moved on, (whether it be with an assignment or ultimately retiring), I really didn't stay in touch with most of them. Every now and then I would run into them on the road or even get to w*rk/fly with them again and usually the reunion was a good, fun time.


For about a month after retiring, I was still getting "group text messages" about stuff going on. Everything from "what's for lunch?" to "is the jet going to be ready tomorrow". I finally told them they really had to stop sending me those texts or I would change my number.


One of the things I *do* like about Facebook (and for the most part, I HATE it) is that I can keep up with some of my old AF buddies and since most of the guys (and gals) I served with are also retired, there isn't much talk about the AF days. One thing I did notice is that I "followed" several Facebook pages that are about planes I flew, organizations I was in and other general military stuff. I no longer follow most of those pages since I just really don't care anymore. Many folks looked at the time in the service as a "lifestyle" (and it really IS), but to me, it was nothing more than a j*b that I could tolerate most of time.


Anyway, as far as the last group I w*rked with, I have had lunch with a couple of them a couple of times, but for the most part, I have moved on and away from that former life...and it's GREAT!
__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 11:47 AM   #30
Full time employment: Posting here.
Tailgate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 881
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinwood View Post
It really doesn't matter whether you let go or not - they are going to move on.
+1... I started to become invisible as soon as I announced.. my staff (who I genuinely loved and appreciated) turned their attention to my successor and began politicking and jockeying for position with him... just human nature. I actually enjoyed observing the goings on with fascination. It was like I was back in High School...

As far as 'me' putting it behind me... took a couple of months to adjust then it started sinking in that I was in a new and wonderful territory.... good luck..
__________________
Tailgate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 01:10 AM   #31
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 73
My wife noticed that for people that retired, the relationships would never be the same. Retirees in her section would be invited to get-togethers, but they no longer had the same connection as before, so after a while they would decline the invitations.

Last week, I received a few e-mails from work asking about projects that are ongoing. Will be going back to the office on Tuesday to drop off gifts to selected people and to bring our two doggies along for the visit.

Tomorrow marks is the second Monday after my wife & I retired. It feels weird not having to work tomorrow abut it's nice!
__________________
ampeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 06:21 AM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 4,330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Car-Guy View Post
+1
The two things I can't believe I put up with for almost 40 years was the ~40 mile round trip daily commute into downtown Houston and the endless office politics.
I was doing close to 40 miles each way. I only lasted 3 years doing that before I pulled the plug. I fortunately didn't have to deal with office politics. I wasn't interested in getting promoted and didn't care if I got fired. I did my job and tried to be nice to everyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ampeep View Post
My wife noticed that for people that retired, the relationships would never be the same. Retirees in her section would be invited to get-togethers, but they no longer had the same connection as before, so after a while they would decline the invitations.
We have very few retirees out of my department in the almost 10 years I was there. I can only think of 3 real retirees and I'm one of them. The other two used to get invited to an annual "team building" event held in April. One never showed up and one came once the year after he retired. He wasn't invited last year. I haven't been invited so I suspect "budget cutting" has been applied.

I'm gone both physically and mentally.
__________________
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane -- Marcus Aurelius
2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 07:02 AM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigfish View Post
I will be retiring in a few weeks after managing a small department for a number of years. It's been a great ride and good job, most of the people who work for me i hired and I have become fond of. So those of you who have left good jobs with good people how have you let go and how long has it taken to put your job in the past?
bf
Took me about two or three full years to put the job behind me after 35 years of working with some exceptional people.

What surprised me the most was that the people I'd been closest to, and expected to stay in touch...never saw them again (after that awkward 'lunch get-together/stay in touch period of 3 months). The people who I felt just "worked with" me, have stayed in contact after 10 years now.

A fellow who had had a lot of transfers and moves once told me: "in general, 10% of the people are sad to see you go, 10% are happy to see you go, and 80% don't give a damn either way"
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 07:14 AM   #34
Recycles dryer sheets
Dd852's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: London/UK
Posts: 213
A fellow who had had a lot of transfers and moves once told me: "in general, 10% of the people are sad to see you go, 10% are happy to see you go, and 80% don't give a damn either way"

This was so true for me too. And I never would have guessed who would fall into which category (other than a couple of obvious ones). You can't feel too hurt about people you really felt something for who drop you, yet you can feel pleasantly surprised by the real dark horses who somehow were touched by you in ways you had no idea about.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
Dd852 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 07:42 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd852 View Post
A fellow who had had a lot of transfers and moves once told me: "in general, 10% of the people are sad to see you go, 10% are happy to see you go, and 80% don't give a damn either way"
I haven't been back in the building since I ERd about 19 months ago, but it would be interesting to go back and say hi to people and see how many of them hadn't even realize that I was gone.
__________________
Which Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 09:42 AM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,587
First job out of college was at a large mega corp aerospace company. Heard a saying there that I still repeat to this day:
"Put your hand in a bucket of water and then pull it out, the hole that is left is how much you will be missed"

I am sure for smaller companies this is less true, but for large places I think it is accurate.
__________________
After Monday & Tuesday even the calendar says, W-T-F...

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/16 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 11:06 AM   #37
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by 38Chevy454 View Post
First job out of college was at a large mega corp aerospace company. Heard a saying there that I still repeat to this day:
"Put your hand in a bucket of water and then pull it out, the hole that is left is how much you will be missed"

I am sure for smaller companies this is less true, but for large places I think it is accurate.
Very interesting comment about working for that aerospace company!

When I lived in Seattle, work slowed down at my firm, so I was 'loaned' to a large aerospace company. My desk was in a very large space with desks as far as the eye could see to the front/back/sides of me. They even had a closed circuit TV station providing company news.
__________________
ampeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 11:19 AM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by 38Chevy454 View Post
Heard a saying there that I still repeat to this day:
"Put your hand in a bucket of water and then pull it out, the hole that is left is how much you will be missed"
Doesn't sound like that worked for Van Halen regarding David Lee Roth, but I digress...
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2015, 04:48 PM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 377
I worked at my place for over 25 years, ending as a manager. I loved working with most everyone at the organization, except my boss. She made my life there horrible that as soon as I hit my magic number of $, I retired at 54.

I still miss hanging with my friends at work, we laughed every day and it was a very creative atmosphere. I still see some of them but find that I have to be the one who contacts them for social activities. I was so happy not to be there under the thumb of my boss that the minute I retired I was gone in every which way.

Went to a retirement party there last month and fell into easy conversation and laughter with everyone but after awhile they were talking about things I had no part of, new department jokes I didn't understand and a definite clique feeling came over me. I left promptly but decided to look at it philosophically and to maintain friendship with those that feel the same way. I see the other retired folks from work as well, we all keep in touch.
__________________
LinCella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2015, 07:05 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florence, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 2,093
My office was 4 hours from home, and we worked from home. Throughout the years, we spent months living in hotels in Atlanta working in the office with 10-12 other road warriors. And we were very close.

Our company downsized, closed field offices and left employees working from home until we reached 55 years of age. Forced retirement was great.

But virtually nobody we were so close with ever talks to each other. We all went our own way in retirement.
__________________

__________________
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Should we be letting kids handle more of college costs? rob in cal FIRE and Money 66 06-04-2014 10:51 AM
Canadian Man Hit With $11,000 Cellular Bill for Letting Kids Stream Movies MasterBlaster Other topics 0 02-12-2012 09:41 PM
Letting Go of Employment DangerMouse Life after FIRE 17 10-27-2011 10:34 AM
Hi, I am nervous about letting go of my money... nanaS Hi, I am... 25 08-13-2011 07:33 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:06 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.