Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Like your parents?
Old 03-01-2010, 12:14 PM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
HsiaoChu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 389
Like your parents?

Just wondering how many of you either emulated or are emulating your parents retirement process? Has anyone learned from their parents and are determined not to make the same mistakes, or to do it right like they did?

Z
__________________

__________________
HsiaoChu is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-01-2010, 12:18 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Just wondering how many of you either emulated or are emulating your parents retirement process? Has anyone learned from their parents and are determined not to make the same mistakes, or to do it right like they did?

Z
I would not want to emulate my mother, but OTOH I consciously realize that my path is very similar to my Dad's, and IMO his path was quite successful for him and a similar lifstyle is working well for me.

Walking, city life, arts, seeking friendships close or casual. By the time my Dad died most of his friends were a generation younger because many of his older friends had already kicked from too much party time in youth and middle age.

Ha
__________________

__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 12:23 PM   #3
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 3,851
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Just do it right like they did?

Z
Please ...

I left home the month after I turned 19, and never looked back.

That answer your question ...?
__________________
rescueme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 12:30 PM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Fireup2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,186
My parents retired at 61 and 54 - basically Dad ran the numbers, and lo and behold, they pulled the plug on the same day. I am tracking for retirement in 10 years at age 50, so while I was not racing to "beat" them at ER, or even considered them ER's - they were very good role models - despite the fact I have had little financial "training" from them. Mom used to shake her head at my concern for my retirement in my 20's. Besides, they made me grow up in a small community in NoCal (I always figured we were poor because we lived in the country!) with great friends and a solid community - many of my friends are raising their kidlets there too! After they retired, they moved into Sacramento because the ranch was "too far from their social life!" (railroad museum, bike trails, parks, etc...) Go figure!

Dad would spend good money on certain things (top of the line sometimes - must be the Mech Eng in him!), but was frugal in others. Mom was 3rd generation Italian, so we canned tomatoes, jams, peaches, made sausage, pasta, dried fruits, baked goodies, etc. Many of my peers have no clue about cooking & baking - I love this stuff - and it often saves money!

I find myself very frugal in some areas - must have picked up this trait from my nurturing! (I was adopted @ birth)
__________________
Make no mistake, my friend, it takes more than money to make men rich. - A. P. Gouthey
Fireup2020 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 12:41 PM   #5
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,375
My parents both passed away before retirement--thank goodness I've not emulated that! DH's parents lived/are living long into retirement but so far, half way into year 2, he has not emulated them at all (sit in a chair and count your ailments).
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 12:41 PM   #6
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Just wondering how many of you either emulated or are emulating your parents retirement process? Has anyone learned from their parents and are determined not to make the same mistakes, or to do it right like they did?

Z
My parents retired in their home on the beachfront in Hawaii in their mid-50's. Then my father (a surgeon) decided to ESR and opened a new office where he continued working for the rest of his life, though not as many hours and lower stress. They traveled constantly, had a lot of parties, and went to plays, symphony, or opera nearly every week. They were very happy in ER (and then in ESR).

That sort of busy-busy retirement would not really suit me. They were who they were, and I am who I am. I think my retirement is just as happy as theirs was, but it is tailored to be just right for me (as theirs was just right for them). I don't think my retirement was at all influenced by theirs, though I do remember feeling so sad for my father when he heard he had terminal cancer - - the same day back in 1981 that he was moving out of his office to completely retire. He was literally moving out, in that he had the moving van there that day and my brother helping him to lug the furniture out. Then after an exhausting day, he stopped off at his doctor's office and got that shocking diagnosis. I remember hoping that would never happen to me (and it didn't!)
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 12:57 PM   #7
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Just wondering how many of you either emulated or are emulating your parents retirement process? Has anyone learned from their parents and are determined not to make the same mistakes, or to do it right like they did?
My father ER'd at age 53 in the 1980s to care for my mother, who was dying of cancer. Unfortunately she died the week he ER'd. He later took consulting contracts when he felt like it, but his reputation spread and the contracts began to grow. After about five years he tired of working "part-time 40 hours per week" and swore off work for good. He's done fine.

About 10 years later I was kvetching that I wasn't interested in any careers after Navy. He asked "Why would you want to work? Haven't you saved enough money?" Well, duh.

Spouse's father "ER'd" at age 60 in 1994 after the company offered a lump-sum buyout that was just too good to pass up. He enjoyed the stock market's subsequent runup but was pretty badly shaken by 2001-2002. (Some of his former co-workers lost their lump sum in tech stocks and had to return to work in their late 50s and even late 60s.) He and his spouse lost their risk tolerance and went 100% cash by 2003, just in time for record-low interest rates. To this day they won't touch anything riskier than a CD and continue to scrimp to avoid spending any principal.

Luckily they no longer share the blow-by-blow with us... we generally avoid anything they think is a good idea. Unfortunately they have great genes, they're in excellent health, and they'll probably continue to live like this for at least another three decades.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 01:19 PM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
easysurfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 7,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Just wondering how many of you either emulated or are emulating your parents retirement process? Has anyone learned from their parents and are determined not to make the same mistakes, or to do it right like they did?

Z
I didn't emulate my parents (they are both no longer around), but I find the older I get, the more I act like the way they used to act.

Does that count?
__________________
easysurfer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 01:24 PM   #9
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,613
I'd love to, but my dad had a solid pension and early retiree health insurance. I won't be able to emulate those, unfortunately (I have one puny pension from a previous employer waiting for me but that's not likely to provide more than 10% of my income needs at age 65 assuming moderate inflation) -- so that will be a MAJOR speed bump waiting for me.

Having said that, because I invested heavily and aggressively throughout my 20s and 30s, I still expect to FIRE before he did (he could have retired at 55 but stayed until he got a sweetheart early retirement incentive at 57).
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 01:36 PM   #10
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,940
Going to visit them for a couple of weeks. The biggest issue is that I need to get on their schedule since they are very busy. They have been "retired" for 20 years but still have their side jobs, counterterrorism and taxes.

Learned frugality and lbym from them.
__________________
Angels danced on the day that you were born.
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 01:42 PM   #11
gone traveling
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3,864
I hope not... my folks retired at 64; dad died 5 months later... mom lived another 8 years on her own, ended up going back to work PT for something to do. (she also did a lot of volunteer work, but always worried about outliving her resources) but they never got to travel in their retirement, spend winters where it was warm, spoil the grandkids, etc.

They did a lot of things "right", but my ER plans and timeline are very different from theirs.
__________________
Westernskies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 02:14 PM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
freebird5825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: East Nowhere, 43N Latitude, NY
Posts: 9,017
My Mom was in the restaurant business all her life - starting out as a waitress at age 18 and finishing up as a salaried head hostess for a fancy seafood place in northern NJ, frequented by NYC celebrity types.
She retired at age 62 with only SS, Medicare and a nice little nest egg of CDs. She traveled solo all over the country once a year on Greyhound's AmeriPass program and had a ball visiting friends and family.
I always tell people..if you think I'm a bit of a nut, you should have met my Mom. Imagine my personality x 10.

I am college educated - thanks to Mom for keeping after me the inspiration to excel . I have full benefits as a surviving spouse and also a little bit more coming in 5 years from my own 18+ years in civil service.

I will definitely emulate my Mom in the travel department but I will fly and rent a car. I am very excited to do my own style of adventuring, but not quite as "low budget".
I plan to travel to a few of my own choice of destinations, and then to a small selection of places she went to.
She is with the angels now, but I am proud to carry the memory of her sense of adventure with me wherever I go.
__________________
"All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." - Walt Disney
freebird5825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 02:43 PM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,044
I think we are emulating my dad. He is frugal, a disciplined investor, a good wealth accumulator, and someone who built his wealth over decades in a conservative but steady fashion. He was lucky to work for 30+ years for the same company and get a nice pension out of it, and he inherited quite a bit of money as well. It helped for sure. But he still lives frugally in retirement and continues to look for opportunity to grow his wealth.

Our moms are basically clueless about money (admittedly by choice), and made a lot of bad financial decisions in their lifetime. They both tend to live above their means and have never saved much money. They both retired in their early 60's but I don't envy their retired lifestyle. Money is tight for both and DW and I sometimes have to come to the rescue.

DW's dad is always looking for the next big deal because he believes that the only way to get rich is to take risks and hopefully hit the jackpot. He sneers at "savers" like us. Unfortunately, he tends to count his chickens before then hatch and it often leads to disaster. He has nothing saved up for retirement and will have to keep working until the day he finally hits that oh-so elusive jackpot.
__________________
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 02:57 PM   #14
Full time employment: Posting here.
ProspectiveBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SoCal
Posts: 667
We aren't emulating either set of parents. DW's folks worked into their 70s, though they probably didn't need to. They were children in Europe during WW2, and are the most frugal & financially conservative people I've met.

My semi-estranged mother is a financial train-wreck; she's 57 and is massively in debt, with nothing to show for it (she's spent her life chasing one get-rich-quick scheme after another). My Dad is fairly clueless about money. He spends what he gets, and is planning to work until he's 70, when he'll retire to Mexico and live on his SS benefits.

None of those options seem appealing to me, so we're going to try an alternate plan: ER at 55 or so.
__________________
I can't complain, but sometimes I still do.
- Joe Walsh
ProspectiveBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 03:01 PM   #15
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREdreamer View Post
Our moms are basically clueless about money (admittedly by choice), and made a lot of bad financial decisions in their lifetime. They both tend to live above their means and have never saved much money.
My mom isn't clueless about day to day money management; she's usually been the one with the checkbook and was always pretty frugal with it. But as good as she is with balancing a checkbook and living within her means, my dad always dealt with the taxes and investing side of their finances. So when he passed and she was fairly clueless about those things I wound up inheriting her tax planning and investing decision-making. She's 74 now, so I assume that leopard isn't going to grow new spots.

My wife isn't too much more savvy about taxes and investing than my mom is, and that's really something I need to work on with her before I'm hit by a bus.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 03:05 PM   #16
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 619
Nope. My Dad retired at 65 and my mother never worked outside the home. They were frugal and lived happily "no frills." I definitely didn't emulate them...but I adored them both and miss them every single day.
__________________
SarahW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 03:14 PM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,537
Nope! Didn't emulate their careers. Didn't emulate their retirement. Didn't emulate their hobbies either, but learned to appreciate their interests growing up even though mine as an adult are quite different.

Well - all except for cooking and eating, that is. Whole family has that in common over multiple generations. That's all we talk about and do when we get together.

Audrey
__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 03:59 PM   #18
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Goonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North-Central Illinois
Posts: 3,198
Yep! I emulate my folks very much! They were always thrifty, and always lived within their means...never above them! After retirement, they still bought new cars, as well as anything else they wanted...for cash! They also traveled a lot...3 or 4 long trips each year, and sometimes more. As well as a lot of shorter 2 or 3 day trips closer to home. And my Mom drove them all!

My Dad was a lab technician for a major petro-chem factory, and retired at 62 with a cola'd DB pension and full health insurance until medicare kicked in then his insurance paid the difference. He enjoyed 10 1/2 years of good health and travel. The last 6 months of life, he was home bound, and his health rapidly declined until his death.

Mom is still alive and kickin' and still healthy as a horse....she'll be 83 in May! I just chauffeured her to Florida (and back) for a couple of weeks...and she loved it! Anyway, that aside, she retired from municipal government at age 60, with a cola'd DB pension. She could have kept her health insurance, but opted to go on my Dad's retiree plan instead, with the same deal ad his...full coverage 'til medicare, then the insurance makes up the difference.

As for me emulating my folks....I was a lab technician and plant foreman for the municipal government, and retired at 50, with a full, cola'd DB pension,and full health and dental insurance for life. I also live within my means, although I still buy whatever I want...for cash (actually charged on my rewards VISA, and paid off in full EVERY month). I love to travel and do so as much as possible...2 or 3 long trips every year, and lots of shorter 1,2, or 3 day trips. In fact we're just now returning from our nearly 3 week expedition to Florida and several points along the way!!!

Life is great!
__________________
Goonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 04:23 PM   #19
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,533
We are pretty close to emulating my parents. We save a lot (roughly half our paychecks). Max the 401k's IRA's etc. My parents do the same. The difference is that I'm roughly 10 years ahead of where my father was at my current age (vietnam war draft, delayed college, working through college, having kids during college, etc). And DW and I both work vs. my mom who did not work while I was young. So our savings and investments are definitely way more substantial than my parents at the same age (if I were my dad I would be graduating college next year).

My parents and I live in nearly identical houses (on opposite sides of town), drive similar cars. I'm an engineer, dad is an engineer. I think we have very different outlooks on a lot of things though.

Since I have a head start on career, savings, and investments vs. my parents, I expect I'll ER roughly the same time they ER or R, or within 5 years of them. But my mom will have a decent inflation indexed government pension by that time.

My parents are frugal to the point of being cheap about some things, and then just seemingly blow money on other stuff (they each rat out the other one to me about "wasteful" spending ). I'd like to thing I'm a much more well rounded frugal person. I'll spend a buck to save some time, effort, or buy convenience, and I don't mind spending a buck to have a wardrobe from this century, and keep cars running properly. But whenever it is time to spend money, my first thought is how can I make this cheaper or avoid this expense? (engineer in me ).
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 04:28 PM   #20
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA suburbs
Posts: 1,769
I'm not yet retired so I don't know what I will be like in retirement. More like my Mom, I think, than my Dad. Mom unfortunately died at 61 of colon CA and never retired from her public school teaching job. Dad was 10 years older than she but lived on another 6 years. He was something of a bon vivant(whereas as she was quiet and modest). He liked to travel, dine out every day, had all kinds of friends both old and new, shopped like a fiend for stuff he didn't need(I came home to find the place filled to the brim with Chinese "antiques" purchased at gimmicky auctions held in hotel ballrooms). He bought 3 new Mercedes in 6 years, stayed out late, then slept all day. Yeah, I won't be anything like my Dad.
__________________

__________________
WhoDaresWins is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help for my parents Miss_Lala FIRE and Money 12 09-25-2007 07:09 AM
How Old Were Your Parents? boont Life after FIRE 52 10-30-2006 08:39 PM
Fair warning for parents, or parents to be... cute fuzzy bunny Other topics 4 02-20-2006 08:46 PM
Aging parents - What to do? John Galt Other topics 53 12-15-2004 07:50 PM
My parents and their inheritance Jane Other topics 42 08-15-2004 10:23 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:04 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.