Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-08-2010, 07:36 PM   #61
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post
If you are interested in metal siding/roof you might consider a metal building. I know a couple of people who have started with a metal barn and finished it as a house inside.
Starting with a pre-cut shed or building shell is a definite possibility. I think these are available with wood framing and metal siding. One more thing to investigate.

Quote:
With regard to handicap accessibility, bear in mind that the space required to really make it ADA compliant (if you choose) is quite a lot. We are building a house and started out wanting to have the master bath and a secondary bath both handicap accessible. It added several thousand dollars of cost to each room mostly because of additional space requirements. The 5 foot turning radius was requiring each bath to be much larger than usual.

We ended up scrapping the idea of accessibility in the secondary bath. We kept it for the master bath although the separate toilet room will be too small to be truly ADA compliant. However, the wall that separates it form the rest of the bathroom can be removed.
Since this house is only going to have one bathroom in it, I will just have to bite the bullet. Either the bathroom has to be adaptable or I have to leave open the possibility of being forced out by a physical disability like a stroke. This could happen to my parents. The bathroom on the ground level of their house is not and could not be made, wheelchair accessible. The staircase to their master suite downstairs is too narrow to have a chair-lift installed, and there isn't really anywhere to put an elevator either. Both my mom and dad have had to use a walker briefly, and that was barely workable with the ground-floor bath. If either of them became permanently wheelchair bound they would have to move out. I don't ever want to find myself in that situation, so the bath will be adaptable from the get-go, including the 5' turning radius. Kitchen too.

Quote:
For the shower we elected to build one that one not have a raised threshold or door so that someone with a wheelchair could just wheel straight in. To achieve this requires a larger shower than normal since the floor needs to slope to a drain and it can't be too steep.

It did allow us to get rid of the shower door entirely since the shower is now 7 ft long.
These shower-only bathrooms are sounding more and more like the way to go. I can't remember the last time I took a tub bath rather than a shower. It sounds like the shower will be bigger than a tub anyway, so if future owners want a tub, it won't be any problem to make the change. Or I could just do like some of the micro-houses and tile the whole room—the bathroom is the shower.
__________________

__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-08-2010, 07:45 PM   #62
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
If you truly mean you want to build the house "by yourself," I'd suggest you fully evaluate that position. Even lifting and positioning those straw bales is more than 50% easier with two people. Unskilled labor can be hired cheaply in most places. On the other hand, having someone present who has experience in whatever method of construction you are doing is worth a lot.

Every environment has it's building challenges. In the PNW it is liquid water and water vapor control. Strawbales can work there, but it's not the first location that comes to mind if a long-term durable house free of mold issues is desired.
I do really mean it. It's an ambition I've had practically my whole adult life, and I'm not willing to give up on a long time dream before I've even tried. Maybe I can do it. If it turns out I can't, then and only then I'll look into hiring people. But I've been a supervisor before. I hated it and wasn't any good at it. I find if I want something done a particular way, it's vastly less of a hassle to do it myself than to ride herd on someone else and make sure they do it.

Gaining experience is a good suggestion. I need to investigate taking a bale building workshop before embarking on my own house. Sounds like a good way to use up the last of my vacation balance before I retire.
__________________

__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 07:46 PM   #63
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 654
Couldn't you just place wide doors to give you a chance to enter the bath room if needed? Maybe not go for the full fledged handicap route. I think you could get by the inspector with just wide doors where needed. I would think that would be your personal business.
Of course you will make the call,
Steve
__________________
Stevewc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 08:09 PM   #64
Moderator Emeritus
Khan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pine Island, Florida
Posts: 6,868
Send a message via AIM to Khan
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
What do you use instead at the joint between flooring and wall finish?
Nothing. Or a very small quarter round.
__________________
"Knowin' no one nowhere's gonna miss us when we're gone..."
Khan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 08:12 PM   #65
Moderator Emeritus
Khan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pine Island, Florida
Posts: 6,868
Send a message via AIM to Khan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnage View Post
What does everyone think about running coaxial, phone, and T1 into every room of the house? I think that would help with resale value. Also, I know a lot of people that wire for surround sound as well. I don't know if it fits "universal design" but I think its best to keep your house as flexible as possible.
Wireless and Home - HomePlug Powerline Alliance

And always overwire: more capacity/outlets/... than required by code.

Don't know if mentioned: lots of plumbing shutoffs and lots of access panels.
__________________
"Knowin' no one nowhere's gonna miss us when we're gone..."
Khan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 08:23 PM   #66
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan View Post
I'm a few years out of date, but back when I was finishing my career I worked in a test lab for home computing, video, and networking gear. The Homeplug concept always sounded good but never lived up to hopes. There were always issues with overheating modules, frequency interference, things like that. As I say, I'm out of date now and they may have solved the problems, but I'd do some serious reading before I counted on it. Great concept though, especially for the less technical or those who just like plug and play.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 08:43 PM   #67
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Htown Harry's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
I do really mean it. It's an ambition I've had practically my whole adult life, and I'm not willing to give up on a long time dream before I've even tried. Maybe I can do it.
"Chuck" did it all by himself in this video.

I can't speak to the framing hardware he used, but the video is interesting because it shows how he overcame some of the practical challenges of getting a few tons of lumber, steel, siding and roofing materials up from ground level without needing a second pair of hands.

__________________
Htown Harry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 09:03 PM   #68
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Htown Harry View Post
"Chuck" did it all by himself in this video.
Interesting, but it looks like Chuck started in the summer, worked through the winter, and the following spring, summer, fall and didn't get it finished before the next winter.

We don't know how many hours he devoted, but that appeared to be just a shed, no bath, kitchen or HVAC or anything, from what I could see.

Seems like a complete house (even a small one) would be a lot to bite off. I'd really want to work side-by-side with someone who is actually doing this to better understand just what it would take, and how much 'supervising' would be required for things you probably need to hire out (electrical, plumbing, some cement work?). It's probably been mentioned, but dealing with inspectors can get very 'interesting' and stressful with any non-standard construction, regardless how good it appears to be.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 09:07 PM   #69
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 5,460
Chuck is a tough sumbitch with good pyramid building genes and handy tractors and such. He also has more than a few construction skills. See Chuck lay out corners and build forms and jigs. See Chuck roof.

The connectors are handy, no doubt, but they aren't magic.
__________________
calmloki is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 09:15 PM   #70
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by calmloki View Post
Chuck is a tough sumbitch with good pyramid building genes and handy tractors and such. He also has more than a few construction skills. See Chuck lay out corners and build forms and jigs. See Chuck roof.

The connectors are handy, no doubt, but they aren't magic.
Yep. There's a reason the countryfolk used to do barnraisings as a community project. 20 guys working on a project for a week can get a lot more done than 1 guy working for the same number of manhours.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 09:24 PM   #71
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,442
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Roll it off a cliff? Naahh. Just put it up on blocks in the driveway and rent it out. Extra income.
Whose driveway? Can I stay on yours?

I am getting tired of home maintenance. A small motorhome is all one needs. And that's only because of the weather. Else, a hammock between two palm trees is all a guy needs, as I mentioned earlier. Houses are overrated!
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 10:04 PM   #72
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
I am getting tired of home maintenance. A small motorhome is all one needs. And that's only because of the weather. Else, a hammock between two palm trees is all a guy needs, as I mentioned earlier. Houses are overrated!
Spoken like a guy who owns two houses and a motorhome.

Hey, at least you have a ready-made answer to "whaddya do all day?".
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 10:38 PM   #73
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Htown Harry's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
Starting with a pre-cut shed or building shell is a definite possibility. I think these are available with wood framing and metal siding. One more thing to investigate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
Interesting, but it looks like Chuck started in the summer, worked through the winter, and the following spring, summer, fall and didn't get it finished before the next winter.

We don't know how many hours he devoted, but that appeared to be just a shed, no bath, kitchen or HVAC or anything, from what I could see.

Seems like a complete house (even a small one) would be a lot to bite off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by calmloki View Post
Chuck is a tough sumbitch with good pyramid building genes and handy tractors and such. He also has more than a few construction skills.
The lesson of the Chuck video is that the house-building process CAN be completed truly solo, but it's going to take a lot of time, skill-building and more than a few specialized tools. And very good balance on ladders.

Chuck is a 1-in-10,000 kind of guy.

An attainable objective for most of the rest of us might be to self-complete the cabinetry installation, plumbing and electrical fixture installation, sheetrock finishing, painting, flooring, fencing and landscaping. These are all skills that can be learned through self-study, a Home Depot demo class and relatively inexpensive trial and error. (See the home remodeling show-and-tell posts by Purron, The Fed and others for what is achievable.)

The next level might be things that would be physically difficult to complete solo, like framing, roofing and anything involving lifting and placing 4x8 sheets more than 4 feet above floor level.

3rd step tasks carry a high risk / expense if you mess up. Hanging exterior doors and windows might fall into this category. Pouring and finishing concrete, too.

Next would be those things that have safety implications, numerous code requirements and other factors that the pros should handle - HVAC systems, gas and water lines, much of the electrical work. (This category has opportunities for DIY cost savings, though. You should pay less to get your sewer line installed if you dig the trench. Installing ductwork is relatively low-skill part of an HVAC installation.)

My two cents:
  • Whatever foundation and framing type you choose, develop a construction strategy that has a general contractor taking the project to X% completion, with you doing the rest.
  • Negotiate with prospective contractors to see what cost-savings are possible if you work alongside some of the tradesman.
  • Realistically develop two budgets - money and time.
My guess is that you will feel plenty fulfilled (and half as burned out) if you take a strong role in designing the house and complete only a portion of the actual work.
__________________
Htown Harry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 08:32 AM   #74
Recycles dryer sheets
nphx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 285
The fabcam.com link was nice for wood frame. i would love to build like blueskyhomes.net ( ) but at $270 sq/ft there seems to be quite a bit of markup.
__________________
nphx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 08:47 AM   #75
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Htown Harry View Post
  • Realistically develop two budgets - money and time.
And -- especially if contractors are involved -- these two sometimes have some interplay. If one is in need of a "rush job" it's likely to cost more, and if you are flexible enough to allow your contractors to schedule your work when it's convenient for them (such as between other jobs), it will mess with your schedule but you may get a price break.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:13 AM   #76
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
FinanceDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 12,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Not sure what you plan to use for exterior siding (brick, stucco, etc.) but I recommend you use something like Hardiplank for all exterior trim, fascia, etc.
Go with steel siding, its even less maintenance than Hardiplank. Make sure all the soffits and fascia are aluminum or steel too, no board to rot out..........
__________________
Consult with your own advisor or representative. My thoughts should not be construed as investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results (love that one).......:)


This Thread is USELESS without pics.........:)
FinanceDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:18 AM   #77
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Nor do they apparently dare stick a single antennae across I-35 in Texas...
They all stopped at my house...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 11:22 AM   #78
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,914
The price quoted by Blue Sky probably included the solar system, they needed a crane. If you look closely, and know construction/architecture you can see where those $$$ went.

My DH worked with another architect to develop CAD programs that enabled modular light frame steel residential construction about 15 years ago. I believe there are a number of modular steel light frame contractors today (assuming the market hasn't killed them). The general contractor puts in the foundation w tie-downs and underground utilities, the steel frame manufacturer goes to the job site to confirm the site conditions (sometimes the general isn't as precise as the drawings and they are known to do their own thing) and the framing is typically on the jobsite in about a week stacked in the order of assembly. A framing assembly is designed to be lifted by two construction workers- it goes together like an erector set. Wiring, plumbing all pre-punched.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 11:25 AM   #79
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,440
Have you ever considered a small condo? For someone who doesn't want to push a vacuum around a couple of times/week you sound like you're setting yourself up for a huge amount of work.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 12:29 PM   #80
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,195
That's my impression too. A helluva lot of work to avoid a bit of ongoing work. But it is a different kind of work
__________________

__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Selling house, low-ball offer received, need advice - long Buckeye Other topics 198 08-30-2009 05:34 PM
MOVED: "10 easy steps to FSBO your house" REWahoo FIRE and Money 0 06-05-2006 04:51 PM
"10 easy steps to FSBO your house" Nords FIRE and Money 4 06-01-2006 01:36 PM
Building new house- am I making a mistake boutros Young Dreamers 15 05-30-2006 09:46 PM
Buy House Now w/Low Down or Save Bigger Down? BigMoneyJim Young Dreamers 11 07-14-2004 05:23 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:37 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.