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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-02-2005, 05:53 PM   #21
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

When we went on vacation to Panama 2 years ago my son's (he was 2) eyes started bothering him. He cried and he wouldn't open his eyes. We took him to the local Children's hospital and was immediately seen by a doctor who examined him and prescribed eye drops. As I was getting ready to pull out my Tricare card the clerk gave me a bill for $5. I slowly put my card away and pulled out $5. Not sure how much that would of cost without insurance in the US but I am 100% sure it would be a little more than $5.
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-03-2005, 09:33 PM   #22
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

HA said:
Quote:
I would imagine if some surgeon started advertising, "Come to me for your bypass, St Simpoleton's across town kills 1 out of three patients, while we rarely lose anybody" pretty soon the medical society would find a way to get his license pulled.
I understand your point there, Ha. I believe the way to approach this 'advertizing' would be not to tear someone else's record down, but rather take the* novel approach of saying what it is that you offer that is different from the others, such as:

"Our staff is qualified in this manner or that, we offer gourmet hospital meals for the patient as well as in our cafeteria, so you don't feel you are in a hospital* (don't laugh, the hospitals here in Thailand have hired famous chefs!* ) we have a workout room so while you are waiting you can work off your stress (the wording needs some work here!* 8)* ). We offer WiFi, counseling services for the bereaved, courses on medicine intreractions, how to read your bill when we send it to you, we will explain the medical codes used...* * ** *offer wellness programs (does your current doctor/hospital do so?)

Or offer to have a doctor explain to you why he/she should be your doctor. He/She should be applying for your services, not us begging to be let in. Even the idea of having soothing music or a fountain in waiting rooms seems out-of-the-box in some US care facilities...* ** *You don't need fabulous art, but a real plant or several would be nice.* *

My whole point is that we as the consumer feel 'so lucky even to have gotten in to see the doctor' that we have lost perspective. In all honesty, I am not joking here.

I recently visited a chronic pain facility in a prestigious city in California. The place was barren, cold, disorganized. Not a plant to be seen, or poster on the wall, no music of any kind and the staff looked like they were the ones in chronic pain. The doctor had to shout for the patient's medical records and list of medications, which the staff took another 10 minutes to find...* I was horrified.*

This place did not instill confidence in me, let alone the friend I accompanied who needed their service. She was due for major back surgery, and I felt very uncomfortable leaving her in their 'care.'

This city is wealthy, but the place looked like a slum - gray walls, dingy, dreary. How can one believe they can get out of chronic pain when even going to this place was pain-full?

Nords:
Quote:
I think it's because 50% of the doctors in America graduated in the lower half of their medical school.* Notice that their diplomas never include GPAs or class standing?
Right..... therefore the 'proof should be in the pudding.'* Our approach should be "why would I come to you for advice? What can you offer me?" We don't just let anyone fix our car, or watch our children, or do our taxes... In the medical field I believe it's all backwards. They have us begging, yet we are the ones who are paying. It doesn't make any sense to me.

Nords:
Quote:
But seriously, a surgeon's book "Complications" is a real eye-opener.* There aren't any medical police who'll swoop in and suspend a surgeon before they make yet another fatal mistake.* Hospital review boards are very slow to act (liability concerns) and will only grudgingly get moving for the most egregious mistakes (or malpractice verdicts).
*

(I should read that book!) Here we are again with the doctors, hospitals and review boards -- not concerned about the patient's wellbeing, but rather how much they could be sued for. It's a money issue, not a health issue.

Nords
Quote:
I wonder how secure these wonderful networks are?* I imagine that story on CNN would shortly be followed by another story on how hackers are searching medical databases to send spam to Viagra recipients...
Everything in life has a trade off. Not having the computer connected from the reception office to the doctor you are seeing in the hospital or clinic is old technology. Pure and simple.*

These files in the offices get lost and misplaced all the time. When you go from one doctor to another (say a specialist) you have the week's waiting period or more for the first one to send your records by courier or mail to the second one, plus the expense of the first one to copy your records so they don't get lost... All this adds to the administrative cost, taking your time as well, and increases insurance costs.

Why not keep your own copies of your medical records?*

I'm not afraid of the idea of hackers sending spam to Viagra recipients, but I am afraid of increasing health insurance costs, without us consumers doing anything about it...

We need dialogue and willingness to consider creative solutions in the States.

Akaisha
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-04-2005, 12:53 PM   #23
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

My mother briefly considered India for her hip transplant. And as we're Canadian it wasn't about the cost but to get the specific surgical technique she wanted and get around the waiting lists. She did end up getting it done in Vancouver but still had to pay $6000 for the prosthesis she wanted which was considered a luxury item (over the usual plastic one she got).

I still wish one could get whatever one needed at home but even in the rich countries with public medicine there's always a limit to what the public system can provide. Part of the reason why the US system is so expensive is that there are still fewer limits (if you're well insured) on what you can get.

There is a line though isn't there? When a child in the developing world dies for lack of a $100 treatment and we spend $1,000,000 to extend the life of someone for 6 months who's going to die anyway. Damn hard line to draw though.
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-04-2005, 01:41 PM   #24
 
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

dougdo, why did you want a non metal Hip, are you under the impression that she would not need a revision?

I am very familiar with Orthopedics and Impants, I would have no problem with a metal joint??

You are in BC, there is a very good Orthopod in Campbell River, Dr Deke Botsford, a real bright star he preferred the lifestyle out West to Fame and Glory.
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-04-2005, 09:18 PM   #25
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

dougdo:
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I still wish one could get whatever one needed at home but even in the rich countries with public medicine there's always a limit to what the public system can provide.
I think there has to be a limit to what the public system can provide. Otherwise taxes would go through the roof. These public systems are not free...* Even if we opened healthcare services up to the free market (which is what I would prefer) there would always be limits...* It's the nature of life.

Quote:
There is a line though isn't there? When a child in the developing world dies for lack of a $100 treatment and we spend $1,000,000 to extend the life of someone for 6 months who's going to die anyway.* Damn hard line to draw though.
I agree, dougdo...* there is never just 'one' answer.

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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-04-2005, 09:43 PM   #26
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

The real issue is who pays for what.* Oregon had a public health plan where x$ were allocated, then used a ranking system based on the cost effectiveness of a treatment to restore subscribers to health/ functionality or provide pain relief.* A line was drawn on the list where the money ran out. That meant that it paid for some treatments but not for others.* The Feds said it violated the Medicaid law.* The net effect is that fewer could be enroled, more folks are out there with no insurance- either getting no care, 'charity' care from hospitals who must pass that cost on to users who do pay, or families are driven to bankruptsy.

I have no issue with people who want to pay through insurance or otherwise for unproven treatments, expensive treatments, or treatments that will extend their lives for a brief time. I just don't want the community to spend it's money that way when the result is that others don't receive basic care.
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...
Old 12-04-2005, 10:07 PM   #27
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Re: More on Overseas Medical Care...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard
dougdo, why did you want a non metal Hip, are you under the impression that she would not need a revision?

I am very familiar with Orthopedics and Impants, I would have no problem with a metal joint??

You are in BC, there is* a very good Orthopod in Campbell River, Dr Deke Botsford, a real bright star he preferred the lifestyle out West to Fame and Glory.
She did want a metal implant. She wanted the implant with the bigger hip joint which allowed more mobility and lasts longer (she's just 67). The standard hip replacement i believe is at least partially plastic. Anyway, she's happy with the outcome.
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