Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-10-2014, 07:12 AM   #21
Recycles dryer sheets
nphx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 285
ooma home - great.

ooma office has hours and hours invested trying to resolve echo for external parties to a call - woudl not recommend at all.
__________________

__________________
nphx is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-10-2014, 08:09 AM   #22
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 7
Touch tones coming through the phone are an artifact of using VOIP. It is not due to OOMA or any other VOIP phone hardware. It's commonly called "DTMF talk-off".
__________________

__________________
Zip605 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 09:16 AM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zip605 View Post
Touch tones coming through the phone are an artifact of using VOIP. It is not due to OOMA or any other VOIP phone hardware. It's commonly called "DTMF talk-off".
We have had three different VOIP systems over the years (AT&T dropped theirs, we moved away from T-Mobile @Home family plan, now have PhonePower), and have only very rarely experienced this. Only time I recall is when DD switched her cell to Verizon, and called from a certain area, and that was only a beep every few minutes.

There must be a lot of variables in this. But DTMF tones were chosen to be non-harmonically related so as to make false triggering from a voice less common. Human voice will have most of its energy in harmonically related overtones.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 09:32 AM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
I have a question. Several posters mentioned connecting their Ooma telo into their old POTS lines in their home. I'm wondering how this is accomplished?

If I understand correctly, the Ooma telo is connected to the internet via the modem/router. How and where do your [old copper house] telephone lines get involved with Oooma and the phone(s) you plan to use with Ooma?

omni
If you have DSL internet rather than cable internet then the DSL modem plugs into the wall (POTS outlet), the Ooma plugs into the DSL modem and your phone (and Wi-Fi router) plugs into the Ooma.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 10:40 AM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
If you have DSL internet rather than cable internet then the DSL modem plugs into the wall (POTS outlet), the Ooma plugs into the DSL modem and your phone (and Wi-Fi router) plugs into the Ooma.
Thanks. Good to know.

And if you have cable internet (as I do), is there a way to utilize the extant POTS wiring? My cable internet router and modem are in a far-off bedroom. I'd like to place an Ooma telo unit in my kitchen and use my house phones where they are currently located (3 bedrooms and kitchen). What is required to have that type of set-up with Ooma?

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 11:12 AM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 5,459
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Thanks. Good to know.

And if you have cable internet (as I do), is there a way to utilize the extant POTS wiring? My cable internet router and modem are in a far-off bedroom. I'd like to place an Ooma telo unit in my kitchen and use my house phones where they are currently located (3 bedrooms and kitchen). What is required to have that type of set-up with Ooma?

omni
We just have a phone cord from the Ooma to a phone jack on the wall. Bingo - house phones all work.
__________________
calmloki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 11:57 AM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,572
Quote:
Originally Posted by calmloki View Post
We just have a phone cord from the Ooma to a phone jack on the wall. Bingo - house phones all work.
This is probably the best way to do it. If you do this, you should disconnect the house wiring from the phone company's Network Interface Device (NID) which is also sometimes referred to as the demarcation point. It is usually a box mounted on an outside wall, or in the basement (if you have one) where utilities enter.
__________________
Rustward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 12:50 PM   #28
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustward View Post
This is probably the best way to do it. If you do this, you should disconnect the house wiring from the phone company's Network Interface Device (NID) which is also sometimes referred to as the demarcation point. It is usually a box mounted on an outside wall, or in the basement (if you have one) where utilities enter.
We had a phone modem from Cox. Disconnected that. Plugged incoming line from the OOMA to the router. The outgoing line went into the POTS jack and everything worked.
__________________
Angels danced on the day that you were born.
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 08:13 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Thanks for all the great responses.

One more question... as mentioned earlier, my router & modem are in a far-off bedroom and I'd prefer to keep the Ooma telo in the kitchen (where my current POTS phone and answering machine are located).

Is it possible to have the Ooma telo located at a distance (on a different floor of the house approx. 25 "diagonal" feet from the router/modem)? If so, is there anything else required for this type of setup?

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 10:10 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustward View Post
This is probably the best way to do it. If you do this, you should disconnect the house wiring from the phone company's Network Interface Device (NID) which is also sometimes referred to as the demarcation point. It is usually a box mounted on an outside wall, or in the basement (if you have one) where utilities enter.
I just want to reinforce this - that is not a 'should', it is a 'must'. The phone company may still have a live voltage on there (48V), and that will probably damage the ooma device. Even if it doesn't damage it, you have a larger load on the wiring (maybe miles of wiring), and will probably cause problems. It is best to first test the ooma with a phone connected directly, when that is shown to work OK, take the next step of connecting to house wiring.

But the solution is simple as you say, just pull the cord out from the box where it enters the house (or otherwise disconnect, depending on the exact type of connection), and label it with a big red label so it does not get plugged back in by some well meaning person.

This leaves the wiring in the house intact, just disconnected from the TelCo. Then as you say, just plug the ooma phone line output into any (formerly live) wall jack, and all the other jacks in the house will be live.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 10:54 AM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Thanks for all the great responses.

One more question... as mentioned earlier, my router & modem are in a far-off bedroom and I'd prefer to keep the Ooma telo in the kitchen (where my current POTS phone and answering machine are located).

Is it possible to have the Ooma telo located at a distance (on a different floor of the house approx. 25 "diagonal" feet from the router/modem)? If so, is there anything else required for this type of setup?

omni
They have a wireless adapter that plugs into the Ooma Telo USB port and can attach to the internet via your wi-fi. I don;t have one so I can't vouch for how well it works.

Ooma Wireless Adapter | Free Internet Home Phone Service | Ooma
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 11:13 AM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 6,321
I wonder how Ooma makes money. They sell and support their device and its use, but their only source of revenue is the sale of the Ooma device. After that, all they collect is taxes. Am I missing something?
__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 12:29 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,572
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
I just want to reinforce this - that is not a 'should', it is a 'must'. The phone company may still have a live voltage on there (48V), and that will probably damage the ooma device. Even if it doesn't damage it, you have a larger load on the wiring (maybe miles of wiring), and will probably cause problems. It is best to first test the ooma with a phone connected directly, when that is shown to work OK, take the next step of connecting to house wiring.

But the solution is simple as you say, just pull the cord out from the box where it enters the house (or otherwise disconnect, depending on the exact type of connection), and label it with a big red label so it does not get plugged back in by some well meaning person.

This leaves the wiring in the house intact, just disconnected from the TelCo. Then as you say, just plug the ooma phone line output into any (formerly live) wall jack, and all the other jacks in the house will be live.

-ERD50
Yes.

My label is not big and red but it is on laminated paper and attached to a small ball of tape that wraps around the RJ-14 connector in the NID.

And, yes, that local loop could literally be miles long, and if it has been abandoned, who knows, it might have a dead short in it. Imagine what that might do to the little power supply in the Ooma.
__________________
Rustward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 03:04 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
I wonder how Ooma makes money. They sell and support their device and its use, but their only source of revenue is the sale of the Ooma device. After that, all they collect is taxes. Am I missing something?
Well, their basic service is pretty limited - I haven't looked in a while, but there are things I get with my VOIP that I would miss in their basic service (I looked - blacklists and a backup number are a requirement for me). Their premium service is $10/month, and I bet a good % sign up for it. And I think they charge to port your number (included in premium I think).

Plus, that $129 adapter probably costs them $25? I can buy my adapter (non-proprietary VOIP) for $37 on amazon, free shipping. If it were to die on you after 4 years, that another $129, versus $37 for me.

When you add up all that, I don't think their prices are that different on average than other VOIP providers. When I compared in June 2012, ooma (with premium) was more expensive for the first 4 years, then ooma became slightly cheaper (assuming you didn't have to replace the box, a fair assumption). I'm averaging ~ $14-$16 per month for my PhonePower VOIP (varies depending on amortizing the equipment and one-time costs).

Callcentric can be good if you make relatively few calls. We set up our in-laws with them, they charge ~ $70 in one time fees (including $25 to port number and a $40 adapter I got thru Amazon), and just $3.50 per month for 911 and keeping the line active, plus calls are charged ~ 1-2 cents per minute. Roughly $8/month for them at around 250 minutes per month.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 03:48 PM   #35
Recycles dryer sheets
NoMoreJob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 169
I installed an Ooma system for my sister and she has been very pleased with it. I chose not to use Ooma because I wanted a couple of features such as call forwarding and voicemail-to-email which added $120 per year to the cost of Ooma. Instead I use another Voip provider (www.Voipo.com) which provides the necessary router free of charge and costs about $85 per year when on special (which I've been able to get for a number of years by renewing early).

A word of caution if you would choose to use Voipo....I had some problems with their service until talking them into giving me a Linksys router instead of the cheaper (for them) standard alternative.
__________________
NoMoreJob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 04:10 PM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
gauss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Thanks. Good to know.

And if you have cable internet (as I do), is there a way to utilize the extant POTS wiring? My cable internet router and modem are in a far-off bedroom. I'd like to place an Ooma telo unit in my kitchen and use my house phones where they are currently located (3 bedrooms and kitchen). What is required to have that type of set-up with Ooma?

omni
I think it would be wise to avoid the wireless link between the ooma box and the router, at least initially while you are trying to access the performance of the system and adjust it accordingly. I would connect them with old fashioned CAT 5 cable until you are happy with the performance.

Is there an advantage to having the Ooma box where you see it? I put my VOIP box next to the router with the phone line back fed into a phone jack in my rarely visited "junk" room (and of course building phone wiring disconnected from phone company wiring at the point of demarcation).

With this setup all my POTS phone extensions could be used, as-is, in their original locations.

-gauss
__________________
gauss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 04:18 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
I wonder how Ooma makes money. They sell and support their device and its use, but their only source of revenue is the sale of the Ooma device. After that, all they collect is taxes. Am I missing something?
For a lot of companies, the business model isn't to 'make money' but to get bought out by the likes of Google for $X billion in a few years. (see G buying "Nest" thermostats).

Then, G ends up doing something more meaningful/big/expansive/spooky with it.
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 05:15 PM   #38
Recycles dryer sheets
NoMoreJob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreJob View Post
I installed an Ooma system for my sister and she has been very pleased with it. I chose not to use Ooma because I wanted a couple of features such as call forwarding and voicemail-to-email which added $120 per year to the cost of Ooma. Instead I use another Voip provider (VoIP Services by VOIPo) which provides the necessary router free of charge and costs about $85 per year when on special (which I've been able to get for a number of years by renewing early).

A word of caution if you would choose to use Voipo....I had some problems with their service until talking them into giving me a Linksys router instead of the cheaper (for them) standard alternative.
P.S. There are MANY other Voip companies out there....

I know nothing about the accuracy of these particular ratings but just to give you an idea...

VoIP Services Review 2014 | Best VoIP Providers | IP Services - TopTenREVIEWS
__________________
NoMoreJob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:52 AM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
tryan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,449
I bought one of the first models for the lake ... so NO tax or 911 fees here ... $0/month.

Unit still works fine. It fried a few years ago (lightning strike?) and after 4 hours with tech support the level 2 guy sent a free replacement. No problems since. It was re-assuring they didn't make me upgrade to $4/mo. ... they stood behind the original claim ("no monthly bill ... EVER")
__________________
FIRE'd since 2005
tryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 11:12 AM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Quote:
Originally Posted by gauss View Post
I think it would be wise to avoid the wireless link between the ooma box and the router, at least initially while you are trying to access the performance of the system and adjust it accordingly. I would connect them with old fashioned CAT 5 cable until you are happy with the performance.

Is there an advantage to having the Ooma box where you see it? I put my VOIP box next to the router with the phone line back fed into a phone jack in my rarely visited "junk" room (and of course building phone wiring disconnected from phone company wiring at the point of demarcation).

With this setup all my POTS phone extensions could be used, as-is, in their original locations.

-gauss

The big advantage for me to using the Ooma box where I can see it is that it also serves as the answering machine (so I can readily see if there are any messages waiting and play them back). There's also a light on the Ooma box which changes color to indicate if the system is down for any reason.

I have an existing answering machine (as part of my wall mounted cordless phone) but not sure how (or if) it would interact with an Ooma telo system.

omni
__________________

__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:10 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.