Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
PERMANENTLY moving overseas
Old 02-16-2008, 11:44 AM   #1
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
PERMANENTLY moving overseas

I am considering PERMANENTLY leaving the USA and moving overseas when I retire. Please tell me how you deal with these basic itmes ... a) mail - how do you continue to safely get US mail overseas b) money - if you keep your money in US mutual funds, how do you access them? ... get Social Security checks .... pay taxes ... overseas? c) medical - how do you pay for medical? Use US medicade (or similar) d) US citizenship - do you have to travel back to the US each year to maintain it? e) anything else?
__________________

__________________
azb111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-16-2008, 01:35 PM   #2
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by azb111 View Post
I am considering PERMANENTLY leaving the USA and moving overseas when I retire. Please tell me how you deal with these basic itmes ... a) mail - how do you continue to safely get US mail overseas
If you are moving to a developed country with reliable mail service, simply giving your new address to your correspondents and financial institutions should work. Otherwise, I gather there are services which will scan in your mail for you to view online.

Quote:
b) money - if you keep your money in US mutual funds, how do you access them?
Many possibilities, depending on where you are, but at least you should maintain a checking account in the US. Transfer funds into there from your mutual fund, and from there you could do VISA debit card withdrawals or even ATM network withdrawals, depending on where you are.

Quote:
... get Social Security checks
I know someone who I believe has SS checks direct deposited into their Japanese bank account. Ask the Social Security Administration about this.
Or you could use the Stateside account that you kept as advised above.

Quote:
.... pay taxes ... overseas?
Again, keep a checking account in the US, then just mail a check. Or use e-file and EFT.

Quote:
c) medical - how do you pay for medical? Use US medicade (or similar)
US Medicaid/Medicare is not available outside the US. Either go somewhere that will let you join the local national health plan (if one exists), or buy private insurance.

Quote:
d) US citizenship - do you have to travel back to the US each year to maintain it?
No.

Quote:
e) anything else?
Potentially lots else, but again, depends on where you are going.
Where are you thinking of?
__________________

__________________
bpp3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 01:43 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ladelfina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,713
a) my mom sends me my mail periodically. She's my US address for now. The only things I care about are bank/brokerage statements (but I can access those online) and notices from the IRS or DMV (I still have a US license). If you don't have a friend or family member willing to forward you important items, there are forwarding services you can sign up for. Not particularly cheap but apparently reliable, or at least as reliable as the country's mail system where you are going. Most are in no-state-income-tax states. There's one called "Earth Class Mail" that will even send you scans via e-mail (as an option, to save on postage) with parameters for private/junk, etc. what they can open/scan or not. Check around the ex-pat sites for tips and references. A lot of boaters and RVers use these services, too.

b.) Schwab has intl.' accounts.. some other brokerages, too. They may cost a little extra in yearly or quarterly fees. They will also require witholding. If you maintain a US address, though, even via a forwarding service, you don't get into that, and there shouldn't be a problem accessing and trading just as you do now. You will have to pay a currency exchange fee and wire transfer fee to bring funds from the US to wherever you are. SS checks can be made to deposit automatically in your US acc't., or I believe you can have them sent directly to a foreign bank acc't. (you will have to open one up anyway). Paying taxes I do through a Turbotax debit from my US bank account when filing online. You will have to continue to file federal returns as long as you retain US citizenship (and in some cases, beyond).

c.) For medical, it depends on your destination country. Most give residents (once you have established residency) complete access to the public structure. If you want private insurance, you'll have to research the many international/travelers/expat/'your country' offerings. Medicare and Medicaid are only avail. to you in the US. Not at that point yet, so I can't say whether, if something came up, I'd want to bother to travel to the US for care under Medicare vs. just using the "home" system.

d.) US citizenship: Far from 'expiring' after any set time (it doesn't), it's not that easy to renounce.

e.) anything else? It will depend on your determination and desire how integrated you get into your adopted country. For people like me, who maintain financial ties to the US, you will have to operate with one foot in either camp, for better or worse. The crappy low dollar has made it hard for us recently. I know of a couple of expats to Italy who have bailed and returned to the US since they are unable to "make it" on, effectively, 2/3 the money they thought they'd have.

I think it can be a great alternative BUT you should do some soul-searching: is this a retirement "fling" or do you see yourself really leaving and not coming back? (For me personally, this answer isn't clear.) Do you have ties to the new country or will you be starting from scratch? Do you speak the language? (Essential, IMO.) Do you intend to live like the middle-/upper-middle-class natives or ensconced in a gated community? Are you moving AWAY from something, or TOWARDS something else? Are you prepared to deal with a bazillion inconveniences.. from the local shops being open 5 hours a day (it seems), or not stocking peanut butter or cheddar cheese or your favorite Merlot.. to waiting weeks for some tradesman, or months for some gov't. function? Will you miss Amazon and FedEx? (yes.) Are you ready to scale back your expectations of many aspects of life? Can you live among people who haven't read even one book a year? Do you see this as a money-saving gesture, or a life adventure?

If you give us more info, especially about where you are thinking of heading, I'm sure the forum expats from various parts of the world, as well as some of those here who have traveled widely, could give you more particular advice.

--
I see bpp cross-posted w/me. I gave the bloviated version!
__________________
ladelfina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 02:08 PM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Indonesia
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by azb111 View Post
I am considering PERMANENTLY leaving the USA and moving overseas when I retire. Please tell me how you deal with these basic itmes ... a) mail - how do you continue to safely get US mail overseas b) money - if you keep your money in US mutual funds, how do you access them? ... get Social Security checks .... pay taxes ... overseas? c) medical - how do you pay for medical? Use US medicade (or similar) d) US citizenship - do you have to travel back to the US each year to maintain it? e) anything else?
Living overseas is not that difficult in terms of trying to maintain contact with the USA. Most of all my items are electronic. Very few items are sent by snail mail to me these days. However some items, do need to be sent and like other people mentioned, dear old dad and mom, just send it to me when necessary. I also have a freight forwarder that ships anything from the USA or Uk to me (Shop&Ship) very good rates I might add.

In terms of money there are quite a few options when living a global lifestyle. Probably the best account geared towards expats/retirees abroad is HSBC. They have a good presence in most countries and if you open an HSBC Premier account they can sort out all the other accounts globally. You can check the USA site or take a look at HSBC Offshore | Bank accounts, Savings, Investments, Premier Banking, Expat advice abroad Citibank is also another notable one.

Tax wise you are exempt from I think 85k if you are permanently living abroad, but I am sure that does not count for funds maintained in the USA.

medical, depends on the country. If you are a permanent resident, you will most likely get some coverage, or you can find cheaper options. The USA is one of the most expensive places for health care, so you might find alternatives like Panama/South America cheaper. In Dubai, it's quite inexpensive and you have many options.

Citizenship, you have it forever as well as filing a tax form every year!

Any idea where you want to move to? What are the reasons?

Billman
__________________
billman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 02:55 PM   #5
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
Goals - a) simplify, b) out of the USA rat race, c) adventure, d) Not running from or to anything in particular, e) stay young, active, never get old, etc.

Location - Central / South America, Asia .... or similar, like Mexico. Not expensive locations like Europe.

Just doing initial research. Still fully employed. Like working. Have a nice job, etc. Considering options for the future.
__________________
azb111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Living overseas is easier than you think...
Old 02-16-2008, 03:35 PM   #6
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9
Living overseas is easier than you think...

A) Go electronic as much as possible. Use parent's or sibling's address as a fall-back position. Use a forwarder only if you are shipping something of value that can't easily be found in your new home (but beware import duties). Be prepared to find substitutes.
b) HSBC/CITI both good choices. You'll want to keep some money in an account at your new locale, but keep the bulk funds US-bound. Even with the sinking dollar, it's much easier to think in terms of dollar-based securities and investments versus trying to figure that out in a new currency. Do shop around for the best exchange rate, and do carry some dollars with you abroad for currency hedge and/or travels to other countries. SS/taxes will go in/out of the US account (s).
c) don't get ill! you can find good health care abroad, but it's usually not cheap and you may need a waiver of some sort to use it. Ask professional expats in your new locale how they are covered. Don't be averse to taking a medical "holiday" in Thailand or Costa Rica if necessary.
d) don't give up US citizenship. ever.
e) other things: Start dieting now, and learn to eat smaller portions. Learn the language, or at least as much as you feel comfortable with. Be prepared for inconveniences. Bulk up your FF account before jumping ship.
Have reliable internet/cellphone coverage, so you can be found (if you want). Don't expect much help from US consulates/embassies abroad.
Despite a LBYM lifestyle, be prepared to face the populace as a wealthy man, and be judged accordingly. Maintain contacts with your current/past employers, should all else fail and you need to come back and work more.

If you have more specific Q's, send pmail.
__________________
Raul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 11:22 PM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,304
Quote:
a) mail - how do you continue to safely get US mail overseas
Go electronic for as much as you can. Bank, Brokerage, accts, ...etc.
I am 90% there with my important stuff. I think I saw the usps offer forwarding for a price, but not sure if it sent to overseas locations... probably not. My snail mail goes to DS house while I'm away.
Quote:
b) money - if you keep your money in US mutual funds, how do you access them? ... get Social Security checks .... pay taxes ... overseas?
I maintain a checking, savings, visa account at bank. I pay all bills electronically. The one or two I can't I have my DS pay for me.
Use ATMs if they are available in the country that you go to (some 3rd world countries don't have them yet ). Banks, especially in 3rd world are unreliable and/or expensive (exchange rates and fees will kill you).
Have your brokerage/MF firm set up ACH transfers, so you can request or setup monthly transfers to your checking acct (the one with ATM access). SS, when I apply for it, will go to my checking acct (ATM-able), I haven't figured out taxes, but I am out of the country for only part of the year and will return in time (this year) to file an extension and work on my taxes. I plan on figuring out e-tax for next year.
Quote:
c) medical - how do you pay for medical? Use US medicade (or similar)
don't know have no need yet ... I come back each year for my physicals and dentist check up.
Quote:
d) US citizenship - do you have to travel back to the US each year to maintain it?
Don't EVER give up US citizenship. If you are ever in a jam, you want to have entered a foreign country on your US passport ... otherwise, the US govt may not be able to get you out. As pointed out by others, it is harder than hell to get rid of you US citizenship ... they want their god given right to your taxes.
Quote:
e) anything else?
a hundred other things...
If you haven't tried living overseas before, you will definately be in for a culture shock. Little things, like waiting in line only to figure out no one else waits their turn, ... boiling all your water to drink/brush your teeth or having to buy lots of bottled water. Bureaucrats that make ours in the US look like their your personal servant. Hot water and electricity available for the WHOLE DAY (and night). Services that are taken care of for you at home that you have to take a little extra effort at ... like taking out the garbage. OR You have to pay up and live in an expat community and pay for all the luxurys (read normal services you get in the US) of life.
Depending upon the country I could go on and on.
My reccomendation would be to take an extended 'visit', say two or three months, to a country you would like to live in. Rent a furnished condo and try it out for size. Learn to be conversant on the basics of the language, so you can get from point a to point b, buy things at the local market, ask for help, ask if they speak english ...

I think it's not for everyone, ... but if you are flexible (in thought and action), an adventurer/explorer, and love to experience different things, then you may be someone who would love to be one of the many expats out there.

Good luck.
__________________
Life is GREAT!
megacorp-firee is offline   Reply With Quote
Been mostly overseas since 1970
Old 02-17-2008, 02:33 AM   #8
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 143
Been mostly overseas since 1970

Hi-
Interesting to see someone going overseas to escape the rat race. I've been overseas as an international teacher since 1970, except for about 3 or 4 years off and on teaching in Texas. I've lived in Singapore (20 years), Liberia (3 years), Venezuela (2 years), Vietnam (6 years), Thailand (1 year), Korea (3 years), and about 2 years in Saudi Arabiuia and Iran. Now I'm in Jordan at the age of 61.

There are rat races everywhere. I am actually looking to live in a country I have not had much chance to experience- the USA. I do not look at it as a rat race, because I believe you can live a very simple life style just as you can in the countries I've lived in. I need to get back into my own culture for a while, at any rate.

Having said that, when you get overseas, I suggest you use the insurance I use. It's IHI (International Health Insurance). It's a company from Denmark, and a subsidiary of BUPA from England. It's the only international insurance company that insures you no matter where you are in the world. You can purchase a policy only when you are overseas,but when you return to the states to live, you're covered. You cannot buy this policy within the USA.

Second- I've dealt electronically with everything. My big mistake, however, was years ago not keeping my US credit cards, but instead having VISA, American Express, and Diners Club cards from Singapore. This does not in the least help my credit rating in the USA. I literally have none, which means when I buy a townhouuse, I'll most likely have to pay most of it in cash.

Third-Living overseas is great. However, you see your own country from the eyes of others, and believe me, it's not very good. Interesting that the not very good part relates mostly from 2000 to now.

Best of luck in your move overseas.

Regards, Rob
__________________
Rob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 03:00 AM   #9
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Indonesia
Posts: 62
I think you should be looking at Belize or Panama. Both have their pros and cons. Belize is English speaking and their currency is pegged to the dollar. Panama is dollar based, but Spanish is the language.

Again, you need to a visit to what you think your top 5 destinations will be and really hit the ground. Both countries have a retirement visa program that will entitle you to permanent residence if you can prove income and some other factors.

Good luck and keep us up to date.

Best Regards,

Billman
__________________
billman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 03:26 AM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rambler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,250
Good to know you are beginning with research. But DO NOT leave the US if you are trying to avoid the US ratrace. It follows you and if you are in a location with minimal services (i.e., unreliable internet, no FedEx, sporadic electricity and on and on) you will have a very difficult time trying to comply with the rules and regs (taxes) and if you do not comply (regardless of the reason...no internet, electric, etc), you could find your US accounts impounded! Then you will really be out of the rat race and up **** creek without a paddle. I'm not saying don't do it, I live overseas myself, for now,...but if you do decide to do it, make sure you know exactly what you are getting into, and don't expect the tax and compliance ratrace to disappear.

R
__________________
Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 03:44 AM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by azb111 View Post
I am considering PERMANENTLY leaving the USA and moving overseas when I retire. Please tell me how you deal with these basic itmes ... a) mail - how do you continue to safely get US mail overseas b) money - if you keep your money in US mutual funds, how do you access them? ... get Social Security checks .... pay taxes ... overseas? c) medical - how do you pay for medical? Use US medicade (or similar) d) US citizenship - do you have to travel back to the US each year to maintain it? e) anything else?
Sounds like an adventure. When you say permanent, do you mean till death or for the next 5-10 years?
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 05:11 AM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
Good to know you are beginning with research. But DO NOT leave the US if you are trying to avoid the US ratrace. It follows you and if you are in a location with minimal services (i.e., unreliable internet, no FedEx, sporadic electricity and on and on) you will have a very difficult time trying to comply with the rules and regs (taxes) and if you do not comply (regardless of the reason...no internet, electric, etc), you could find your US accounts impounded! Then you will really be out of the rat race and up **** creek without a paddle. I'm not saying don't do it, I live overseas myself, for now,...but if you do decide to do it, make sure you know exactly what you are getting into, and don't expect the tax and compliance ratrace to disappear.

R
TAXES DO NOT DISAPPEAR ... REPEAT ... TAXES DO NOT DISAPPEAR.
You will always have the liability as long as you are a US citizen. If you never want to come back ... get all of your dough outta US accounts, then maybe you can get away with it ... but talk about hassle...
It's easier to pay the darn things.
__________________
Life is GREAT!
megacorp-firee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 06:10 AM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rambler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by megacorp-firee View Post
TAXES DO NOT DISAPPEAR ... REPEAT ... TAXES DO NOT DISAPPEAR.
That's right and living overseas complicates it. Mine are so complicated that megacorp pays (on my behalf) more to the tax preparer to prepare my taxes than the average retiree or even the average working stiff pays to the IRS in taxes. Of course there are a lot of factors that make it complicated including returns to one foreign government (and its overseas income tax payments provision), the IRS (and its exemptions and oversears tax provisions), one state government (and its non-resident status provisions), plus tax equalization calculations. That was not meant to be a prideful or gloating statement, but it hurts to see that much money going out the door. It would hurt a heck of a lot more if my tax returns would not professionally prepared, and it would come out of MY pocket.

Keep in mind also that some governments want to tax your worldwide income if you either obtain permanent residency OR have de facto permanent residency (say 5 years). Then you are hit up for taxes in your host country. You do have certain tax exclusions while living outside of the US, BUT, the exclusions apply to the threshold (now about 85k I think as mentioned above), and to taxes paid to a foreign government. If you pay less than what you would have paid in the US you will have to pay the remainder to the US (except the threshold exclusion). Finally, some governments see investment income (LT cap gains and dividends) as current income (same as salary). So you may end up paying more tax overseas than had you stayed in the US.

My advice: do your research, and get professional tax advice.

The above is based on personal experience and should not be construed as financial or tax advice from a professional...just someone who has been around the block once or twice and learned a couple things from the school of hard knocks...

R
__________________
Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:43 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
lazygood4nothinbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,895
i am also considering long-term, if not permanent overseas retirement but mostly because i am too cheap to pay what i view as outrageous health insurance premiums (even though, compared to what i've seen on this board, i'm actually not paying all that much.)

so i'm thinking of about just 10 or 14 years overseas and then returning to the u.s.a. in time to benefit from medicare at 65. also, since it is pretty comfortable here, maybe i'd want that again into my older age. by living cheaply overseas for those years, i'd benefit with personal growth offered in the adventure of extended travel throughout the developing world while rebuilding my burst bubble money back. as they say: it's all good.
__________________
"off with their heads"~~dr. joseph-ignace guillotin

"life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages."~~mark twain - letter to edward kimmitt 1901
lazygood4nothinbum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 04:15 PM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob View Post

Third-Living overseas is great. However, you see your own country from the eyes of others, and believe me, it's not very good. Interesting that the not very good part relates mostly from 2000 to now.

Best of luck in your move overseas.

Regards, Rob
LOL, that's so true. You're American no matter what your politics are, and you'll actually start to get a bit tired of having to constantly listen to all the BS.
__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 04:17 PM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazygood4nothinbum View Post
i am also considering long-term, if not permanent overseas retirement but mostly because i am too cheap to pay what i view as outrageous health insurance premiums (even though, compared to what i've seen on this board, i'm actually not paying all that much.)

so i'm thinking of about just 10 or 14 years overseas and then returning to the u.s.a. in time to benefit from medicare at 65. also, since it is pretty comfortable here, maybe i'd want that again into my older age. by living cheaply overseas for those years, i'd benefit with personal growth offered in the adventure of extended travel throughout the developing world while rebuilding my burst bubble money back. as they say: it's all good.
I admire your gumption, but what are you going to do for friends? I have moved all over the U.S., and it's not so good for the social life. Maybe you'll have more time in retirement to socialize without the demands of a job sucking the life force out of you, but 14 years overseas followed by returning to the U.S. at 65 isn't going to give you a strong social network.
__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 05:04 PM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
lazygood4nothinbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by BunsGettingFirm View Post
I admire your gumption, but what are you going to do for friends? I have moved all over the U.S., and it's not so good for the social life. Maybe you'll have more time in retirement to socialize without the demands of a job sucking the life force out of you, but 14 years overseas followed by returning to the U.S. at 65 isn't going to give you a strong social network.
not a problem. i've already buried my three very favorites yet i have survived even that and look foward to hopefully one day finding a fourth. i am seriously completely unemcumbered, tied neither to job nor family nor friends nor debt nor favors owed.

my old friends by now are scattered throughout the country in n.j., penn, calif, east & west coasts of florida. and i have many old friends including some dating back to the playground. my cousins of a once very close family now range from maui to new york city. and all my aunts & uncles will soon be dead as my generation steps up to the grave.

in south florida, while i do have one old friend considering a move here and one just now relocating to sarasota only three hours away, most of the rest have left or died. my drinking buddy is an alchoholic so he'll be dead within 10 years anyway. i've a few other friends & lots of acquaintances here and there in the area but no best friend among them to make me feel at home.

of family i have a cousin here who i see only for family dinners and one i am good friends with but the latter plans to eventually retire to mexico. i had another cousin here who i was very close to but lost her recently to fundamentalistically-styled new agism. my brother will leave florida in 8 years when all his kids get to college. so while i still have family and friends here, they are dwindling & already outnumbered by ghosts.

i can be both easy to make friends but also i am content in my solitude. at our last high school reunion one of the guys commented that i was always and still the life of the party as he remembered my house growing up was party central. but i am also the type to leave my own party while everyone else is having a good time, to sit outside and listen to the laughter within or to walk away in my own silence. i am comfortable with all that. it is just more parts of life.

i neither fear losing the friends i have nor making new ones. you can live in the same place your entire life and never build a social network there or you can build an even wider network, online or in travel with those you would never have met otherwise.

to combine a phrase: distance makes the heart grow fonder while familiarity breeds contempt. the life of a vagabond intrigues me.
__________________
"off with their heads"~~dr. joseph-ignace guillotin

"life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages."~~mark twain - letter to edward kimmitt 1901
lazygood4nothinbum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 10:03 PM   #18
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazygood4nothinbum View Post
i neither fear losing the friends i have nor making new ones. you can live in the same place your entire life and never build a social network there or you can build an even wider network, online or in travel with those you would never have met otherwise.
Beautifully stated, Lazy. I feel the same way and am still considering the Peace Corps. Just completed my application this week! Picking up and leaving everything again is difficult to contemplate but I don't feel that I've set my roots down very far as yet and my kids are independent. So I don't know what could be a better time.

When I return I know that I'll be out of touch to a certain extent but my close friends and family live far away from me right now and I still keep in touch. There's email and vacation time to return home to the USA and visit. I plan on living a long time and will have many years to make more friends. It's better, I think, to try to live some of your dreams while you can and put aside fears of the future.

You don't get a lot of second chances in life, I've learned the hard way.
__________________
Zoocat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 10:08 PM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob View Post
Hi-
. I am actually looking to live in a country I have not had much chance to experience- the USA.

Having said that, when you get overseas, I suggest you use the insurance I use. It's IHI (International Health Insurance). It's a company from Denmark, and a subsidiary of BUPA from England. It's the only international insurance company that insures you no matter where you are in the world. You can purchase a policy only when you are overseas,but when you return to the states to live, you're covered. You cannot buy this policy within the USA.

Regards, Rob
Rob, I'm curious to know what you will do about health insurance when you move back to the USA. And when you're 65, will you be eligible for Medicare, even though you've worked overseas?
__________________
Zoocat is offline   Reply With Quote
Insurance
Old 02-17-2008, 10:23 PM   #20
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 143
Insurance

Hi-

You wrote "I'm curious to know what you will do about health insurance when you move back to the USA. And when you're 65, will you be eligible for Medicare, even though you've worked overseas?"

Luckily I have been in international schools overseas most of my life and some of them have paid into US Social Security. Also, I was in the US Air force, Peace Corps, worked at McDonbalds in high school and college. In short, I will get social security and Medicare. The Medicare is the important thing for me, of course,

I purchased my insurance, IHI, three years ago. The premium is not too bad. It's a $1,600 deductible and the cost is $3,000/year. It covers 1.8 million a year. Even though I'm covered this year by my current school, I thought it was best to get the insurance befire I turned 60 and developed pre-exisiting conditions.

Like I said before, I miss the States, and believe my life there can be quite simple but very comfortable. Howver, I have very close friends in Montreal, Canada, and will spend part of the year there, and as for the other part of the year, I'm looking.

There can be a rat race everywhere you go, and it's that way because we make it that way.

Cheers.

Regards,
Rob
__________________

__________________
Rob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Banking Overseas megacorp-firee Travel Information 23 11-08-2007 01:06 AM
Retiring overseas at 35 Trek Hi, I am... 19 12-26-2006 11:10 PM
Tip: Be Permanently Absent TromboneAl Other topics 26 11-06-2006 09:41 AM
Finally Permanently Retired MJ Life after FIRE 8 12-08-2005 11:58 AM
ER overseas wildcat Life after FIRE 59 06-07-2005 12:56 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:08 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.