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Old 11-07-2007, 06:52 PM   #41
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We've done a lot of traveling since retiring a year and a half ago. All of it has been in the U.S. and Canada. We purchased an RV and plan a trip around the U.S. in April. I have read John Steinbeck's, "Travels with Charley: In Search of America" and found it very inspirational. By the way, for those you who are not familiar with this novel, Charley was the author's dog. We were further inspired when we visited the John Steinbeck Museum in Salinas, CA and saw the camper that John and Charley used for their journey. A couple of things will be different when we take our trip: DW will be with me and I won't have a dog. Our eight year old Rottweiler passed away suddenly yesterday. Just the same, we're really looking forward to the trip, which we will expect to take two months. We do not plan to be perpetual travelers, but do plan on doing extensive travel within the U.S. and some outside the U.S.
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Old 11-08-2007, 12:22 PM   #42
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Two or three points

1) I have heard of 180 day "round the world cruises". That sounds like fun to me.
2) I have a cousin which traveled south america... worked on farms to earn enough money for next "trip", switched countries, found work repeated. He also worked as a bike messenger in NYC and on a fish boat in Alaska one summer. So another way to travel is to work as you go. He has a blog, I will look for it to see if it has any details.
3) Make sure you research travel rewards. For example I had coworker travel to Austraila with 3 friends. 3 of them paid for their tickets and basically got a free trip with FF miles for paying for the one long trip. The 4th used FF miles to get to Austrailia and he mentioned he had hassles getting flights.
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Old 11-21-2007, 04:06 PM   #43
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Tick Tock


1.)Housing and transport are two large areas of expenditure. If you modify your lodging expenses you will save much money. Try Couchsurfing or Home Exchange to aid you in this..

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2.)Consolidate your trips to one area of the globe at a time, or slow down your pace. There's no point in going from Kansas City to the Maldives then back home to Kansas City, wait a few months and then going to Vietnam.

3.)Decide to be either a traveler or a tourist. Tourists spend more $$ in a shorter period of time.

4.)You could also try crewing on a boat or taking up part time employment overseas at bed and breakfast places, hostels, and so on, which provide lodging as part of your salary.



Thanks for giving me the opportunity to clarify: Our 3rd Edition is much more detailed, due in part to our Readers writing to us with specific questions. We added 8 new chapters, extended the ones that were already there, added a links page to bring you to some of the sites we discuss in our book, tell you specifically what equipment we use and give you links for those items as well. We specifically extended our chapters on finance and housing.

Table of Contents

Be well,

Akaisha
Author, The Adventurer's Guide to Early Retirement
Akaisha,

Sorry for the time lag in responding - I do have your third edition bought and downloaded (also get the email updates from your site!) - I'll go back and re-read. Thanks.
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:04 PM   #44
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Hi TickTock,

Thanks. I hope you find our 3rd Edition to cover more material that is useful to you. We don't have a complicated way of writing. Sometimes very practical info will be simply stated instead of being lost in a lot of descriptive words...

Also, you know that you can write to us any time with further questions you may have.

Thanks for your support of our project.

Be well, stay strong!

Akaisha
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Start with a smaller step
Old 11-24-2007, 08:59 PM   #45
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Start with a smaller step

You are getting some great advice. I did an extended travel through SE Asia for 7 months, and travelled with some who had been on the road for 2 years. As you haven't had any foreign travel or extended travel, you might want to plan a break-in trip. My comments:

1. Retirement itself is a major change, and you should give yourself time to adjust to your new status and finances. A year wouldn't be too long to wait before a major trip. There is no need to rush off on anything.

2. A break-in trip of 1-3 months would allow you to begin to understand yourself and how you like to travel, without having to sell the house, etc.
You don't really know the basics, and you don't yet know what your style and level of comfort (physical and financial) is. You can learn a great deal from books and travel boards, but you also learn a great deal from fellow travelers. And there is no substitute for experience. One month will just get you out of the vacation mode, and 3 months might give you an idea of what extended travel entails.

3. If you want to think about foreign travel, I'd recommend SE Asia. Can be fairly inexpensive, lots of travel infrastructure for English speakers, lots of other travlers to get advice from, great food, great culture and history. Lots of natural beauty.

4. There is nothing wrong with starting with a group trip, to see some sights, then taking off on your own, when you have an idea of the area. As others have said, loneliness can be more grating than physical deprivation. You can also plan a couple of group trips, and do independent travel between them.

5. I's recommend you start reading the Lonely Planet guides, and start looking at the Thorn Tree posting boards on Lonely Planet. There is a long-haul board, but there is also and older travelers board. There was a poster on older travelers, Packerjohn, who had very interesting commentaries. Even he got tired of the road and is back, in Canada, I think.

6. There is no one way to do this. Finding those places that you dreamed of as a kid is one way to make a list of places to go.

7. Make sure you plan for problems. That includes medical evacuation insurance, medical insurance, proper vaccinations and indicated medications, care of your properties and investments while you are away. Making sure you start in good health is also paramount.
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Old 11-24-2007, 09:38 PM   #46
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If everything you do comes down to counting pennies, your
not ready to retire or travel extensively. Many cheap places
to be a home base in which to travel from. Best to start your
travels while you have work vacations and not taking away
from your retirement funds. Always base your retirement plans
on what it would be from your home country. This way you will
always be able to return just like Dorthy and be fine.

With the dollar decline and countries finding out that tens of thousands of budget retirees are really strecthing their dismal
infastructure to out of control conditions. Water shortage, road
congestion and garbage control are just a few not to mention they don't want you driving up the housing cost for middle class locals.
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Old 11-25-2007, 12:23 PM   #47
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Re: Budget

A break-in trip will allow you to start understanding how to plan a budget. Here is what I know:

1. Areas of the world vary considerably in their daily cost. Canada, USA, Japan, Western Europe are probably the most expensive. As a basic, low-end USA could be $70 a day. Now with the dollar dropping, Europe might be almost twice that and Japan might be even 3 times that.

2. Only you can determine your expenses based on your travel style. Cheap hostel rooms with noise, drunkenness or drug use, vermin, shared bathrooms, theft risk are not for everyone, everynight. Staying put in one place for a while tends to be the cheapest. However, it is a terrible shame to be so underbudgeted that you can't take an african safari, or fly to the remote lush islands, or even enjoy a beer or two. Knowing your style and how to pay for it is really critical to the longevity of your plans.

3. Read the Lonely Planet guidebooks and posting board. You will start to pick up basic costs for living in countries of interest, how to find cheap flights, what is really worth spending your money on.

4. Only you can determine if you want to spend 10 sluggish months on the beach in Thailand, or if you get itchy feet and want to cover ground and see all there is to see. It would make a significant difference in your expenses.

5. As a really basic guess, a year-long trip visiting 15 different countries would probably be in the range of $25,000-$30,000. This is just an enormous guess.
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Old 11-25-2007, 09:47 PM   #48
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With the dollar decline and countries finding out that tens of thousands of budget retirees are really strecthing their dismal infastructure to out of control conditions. Water shortage, road congestion and garbage control are just a few not to mention they don't want you driving up the housing cost for middle class locals.
This sounds like some places I know of first hand in California! ... I am only half joking here... the only thing not applicable is the term 'budget retirees'.

We just published a piece for The Motley Fool Rule Your Retirement Newsletter about the impact of the falling dollar on Expat living if you are interested: The Dollar is Slip Slidin Away

A854321

You have some very good suggestions there, A8. One must really know their 'requirements' in order to be comfortable. No point in 'retiring' but then can't do what you want to do.

The speed at which one travels and the locations one chooses to reside definitely affects the pocketbook.

Be well,
Akaisha
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Old 11-25-2007, 11:11 PM   #49
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Would be wise to have maybe 25% of your money managed
by Warren and sell off a B share or two a year.
Seen a big majority of 3rd world living by retirees being a slave
to money. Everything they do and every minute of their life
is dictated by what something cost. Most everything in their life ends up being the cheapest crap made or available.

If taking a week or two trip every few months is more than a 10 minute thought on how much it will cost or what you can afford your probably a slave to money. Your most likely not retired and only not working anymore. Retirement age seems to have dropped a decade now days and plenty of it for the expat seems to be
sitting around in plastic chairs conserving money. Boy if that isn't a h*ll of a life to look forawrd to for 30 years and it only gets worse
for most. This being said at least in the internet age many have become more wise on investing rather than these third world
types that will make you money with your money, when they are no better off than you are. You know the type life's one big budget
of h*ll.
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