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Old 01-27-2014, 12:16 PM   #41
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It does for some but my experience being around many 60+ folks (two different private golf clubs) is that the older retired ones do most of the complaining and bitching. You would think life would be pretty good when the toughest decision of your day is if you're going to play 9 or 18 holes of golf but some just have too much time on their hands and complaining becomes a bad habit.
Played golf a few years ago, country club in which I sold my membership. Absolute beautiful day on a beautiful golf course, surrounded by good guys. I was just struck by the amount of bitchin and complainin.
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Old 01-27-2014, 12:48 PM   #42
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Am 53 and love traveling. Still quite mobile but flying long hauls with transit flights to get to a destination is getting harder for my body. So, do travel more to those far off places when you are younger.
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Old 01-27-2014, 02:40 PM   #43
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I agree 100% with your entire post, and especially this part. I sometimes wonder where the hell people who say things like this spend their time, or what an extremely constrained life they must live.
A regular poster on the bogleheads wrote something about 3 years ago that really startled me. I think the person is about 65, but I could be wrong. He wrote something like (from memory, not a direct quote), "Retirement is depressing because you just sit around and wait to die."

Whoa. That is depressing. Maybe I shouldn't retire if that's all the future holds. Unfortunately, I often read and hear similar statements by other people - some retired, some not. And then there are those who tell me I will be too old to do many of the activities I enjoy.

I want to backpack the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada, and maybe the Continental Divide and Appalachian trails too. Another goal is to summit Mt. Everest. There are dozen of national parks I want to see, and not just to the visitor's center. Then there is a bicycle trip across the US. A sub-orbital or even orbital space flight would be a blast (figuratively, hopefully). There are more mundane things too, such as resuming trail running/racing. And I have never done Half Dome in Yosemite, a little surprising since it is nearby. The only time I tried was on a Thanksgiving Day several years ago. The falling snow did not turn us back. But the lightening near the top sure did. So Half Dome is on the list too.

But a lot of people tell me that I will be bored in retirement and not physically capable of doing anything beyond wiping the drool off my face. Such negativity, which I hear a lot, makes me wonder if I am properly and realistically assessing my upcoming retirement situation.

So I am always delighted to hear about "old people" who remain very active. Yes, some of it may be due to genes, some of it may be due to luck, but I think a lot of it is due to personal perspective and reasonable efforts to care for the body. While I sometimes joke to my friends about getting old, and it certainly seems like a new pain shows up every day, I do not see this as a limitation.

I often watch the show "Gold Rush" on the Discovery Channel. One of the featured gold miners is John Schnabel, who is 93 years old (94 next month). While he may be slowing down a bit - retired from gold mining a year or two ago - he is still physically and mentally active. He may die tomorrow, or he may live another 20 years. But he does not let age get in his way. I want to be - and plan to be - just like that.
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Old 01-27-2014, 03:27 PM   #44
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A regular poster on the bogleheads wrote something about 3 years ago that really startled me. I think the person is about 65, but I could be wrong. He wrote something like (from memory, not a direct quote), "Retirement is depressing because you just sit around and wait to die."
With an outlook like that he almost certainly will die shortly after retirement.

We recently started going to a nearby gym, which I approached with some mild apprehension because one knee has been sore on an off for years (had surgery on it 20+ years ago). Within a month that pain was almost entirely gone. So maybe those guys who wrote Younger Next Year know a thing or two.

It was because of the knee that I was thinking of selling my motorcycle in the spring because I wasn't sure I'd be able to hold it up. I'm going to hang on to it a while longer.

Another inspiration was my FIL, who passed away last month after a year in a nursing home. Granted no one wants to go out that way. But for all of his life, despite somewhat declining health for his last two or three years, he walked every day. Just five years ago he walked 7 miles a day, almost every day, and when he couldn't do that he went to a mall.

While he didn't have much money and the last three years he had some serious health issues, he was still one of the happiest people I've known. Everyone who met him, even during his nursing home stay, along his life commented on that.

He had a sign over the fireplace mantle for decades: "Attitude matters. Pick a good one."

So he was doing something right.
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Old 01-27-2014, 06:54 PM   #45
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It does for some but my experience being around many 60+ folks (two different private golf clubs) is that the older retired ones do most of the complaining and bitching. You would think life would be pretty good when the toughest decision of your day is if you're going to play 9 or 18 holes of golf but some just have too much time on their hands and complaining becomes a bad habit.
Seems like common denominator with this and mikefixac post is private country club set. I play a lot of golf with 60+ folks at public course, and they seem generally very happy, grateful, and fun to play with. Best round today with 62 year old.
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Old 01-28-2014, 12:57 AM   #46
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More power to those old folks who keep themselves fit. But for many, bodies breakdown as we age for various reasons beyond our control (job injuries, arthritis, ...).
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Old 01-28-2014, 01:19 AM   #47
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This gentleman is still swimming at 105 (almost). Even if he retired at 65, he has had a 40 year retirement already.

Winnipeg centenarian still doing laps, still breaking world records - Winnipeg Free Press
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:35 AM   #48
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He had a sign over the fireplace mantle for decades: "Attitude matters. Pick a good one."

So he was doing something right.
Where is the Like button?
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:58 AM   #49
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More power to those old folks who keep themselves fit. But for many, bodies breakdown as we age for various reasons beyond our control (job injuries, arthritis, ...).
Very true. One of the people I admired most at a young man fresh out of college was an older fellow near retirement. We developed a good friendship that lasted until his death. He did his best to keep in good shape both physically and mentally. But, he realized that he was slowing down in some areas. Rather than moan and groan about it, he found alternative ways to keep on going.

One day, he decided that making left turns onto busy streets was becoming difficult for him. So, he took out his maps and plotted routes for his most common trips that minimized the left turns. Years later I read that UPS discovered that minimizing left turns made for more efficient delivery routes. As usual, he was ahead of his time.

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the company shave 28.5 million miles off its delivery routes, which has resulted in savings of roughly three million gallons of gas and has reduced CO2 emissions by 31,000 metric tons.
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Old 01-28-2014, 10:16 AM   #50
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This thread reminds me of thoughts I had in my early 30's, when I landed a job doing the exact same work as a group of men in their early 40's. (Several were openly resentful of my sex and supposed youth, but that's another story). Some were already growing big bellies and bad backs, and loved to refer to themselves as "old farts," "old soldiers," "curmudgeons," and the like. I quickly surmised that they were simply fending off attempts to get them to do more challenging work, and I'm sure this attitude extended into their leisure life as well.

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Old 01-28-2014, 01:59 PM   #51
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More power to those old folks who keep themselves fit. But for many, bodies breakdown as we age for various reasons beyond our control (job injuries, arthritis, ...).
There is a lot of truth to this. No matter what they do, some people get the short end of the stick. And then there are those who always seem to get the long end of the stick. With limited effort, fortune and good health follow them around. But I believe the majority of people fall in the middle. They control much, although admittedly not all, of their health outcomes as they get older.

I mentioned my 79 year old mother. She walks 6 miles 5-6 times a week, goes to the gym, and walks up 12 flights of stairs in her apartment complex. Living right next door to my mother is her younger sister, my aunt. I am not sure exactly how old she is but I am guessing about 75. They share the same gene pool and social-economic upbringing. There is nothing dramatically different in their backgrounds (e.g., career choices, injuries). Yet the physical condition of my aunt is rather mediocre. She is overweight, needs a walker, etc.

My mother is active and mobile, but her younger sister is not. The primary reason for these different health outcomes is because my mother and aunt made different lifestyle choices during their lives (e.g., exercise, diet), including decisions made in their more senior years. There is also the attitude issue. My mother believes that there is nothing she cannot do. A guess is that my aunt believes that there is nothing she can do.

When one starts with the assumption that he/she is or will be too old to perform given activities, then there is a good chance that this assumption will be fulfilled. This doesn't mean people shouldn't take advantage of opportunities when they can, including ER. Anything can happen. But personally, I plan to remain active my entire life.
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Old 01-28-2014, 02:08 PM   #52
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I believe staying active is very important, yet I have made some concessions to things as I age with the belief it will help me maintain an active life down the road. In my early 40s I gave up tennis and running, and replaced them with walking in supplement to my other strength training. The knees were really taking a beating from those activities. Ten years later things have appeared to stabilize. And I am not getting on my roof ever again either!
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Old 01-28-2014, 03:17 PM   #53
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One day, he decided that making left turns onto busy streets was becoming difficult for him. So, he took out his maps and plotted routes for his most common trips that minimized the left turns. Years later I read that UPS discovered that minimizing left turns made for more efficient delivery routes. As usual, he was ahead of his time.
Off topic. But if you dislike making left turns try going to Brazil. At least in Sao Paulo. Roads are designed where left turns are not made. It's crazy. You can drive for miles just to get basically across the street. Just going around in right turns only.
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Old 01-28-2014, 03:31 PM   #54
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I love to whine - but after 20 years of ER trying very hard to sit peacefully and watch grass grow and paint dry I find it doesn't work.

Seems like people and events get you involved and you end up very busy - doing nothing in particular.

heh heh heh - so ya think your gonna get bored in ER eh? Go ahead just try - I dare ya!
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:16 PM   #55
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I rarely use my car or public transportation and mostly walk everywhere around town. I also hike in the mountains on the weekends and climb the 16 flights of stairs up to my apartment at least once a day. And then I look at 2 of my friends who were far more active than me. One came down with lupus which has put an end to her backpacking trips around the world. The other one came down with a brain infection that left him partly disabled. I doubt that a better diet, more exercise, and more positive thinking could have changed any of that. Life can change in an instant. Live it accordingly.
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:23 PM   #56
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... I look at 2 of my friends who were far more active than me. One came down with lupus which has put an end to her backpacking trips around the world. The other one came down with a brain infection that left him partly disabled. I doubt that a better diet, more exercise, and more positive thinking could have changed any of that. Life can change in an instant. Live it accordingly.
+1

A lot of one's fate is still in the genes.

It would be sad if a person squanders his/her good genes by failing to maintain good living habits. However, one would be too optimistic to think that by "living right" he or she would stay healthy. Good exercise and diet would be necessary, but not sufficient conditions.
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:37 PM   #57
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I believe staying active is very important, yet I have made some concessions to things as I age with the belief it will help me maintain an active life down the road. In my early 40s I gave up tennis and running, and replaced them with walking in supplement to my other strength training. The knees were really taking a beating from those activities. Ten years later things have appeared to stabilize. And I am not getting on my roof ever again either!
I think this is completely sane; it's my approach too. Some guys will whip the horse until it falls down, others find a different way to finish.

The combination of internet media, and people's recent fascination with being stars leads many to push themselves unduly. What counts, I believe, is staying in the game, not winning every inning.

Ha
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:45 PM   #58
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Off topic. But if you dislike making left turns try going to Brazil. At least in Sao Paulo. Roads are designed where left turns are not made. It's crazy. You can drive for miles just to get basically across the street. Just going around in right turns only.
I rarely drive anymore, I did not replace my car after some SOB T-boned me while I was making a left turn. I never liked L turns in traffic. I am also very careful to keep my eyes on drivers making left turns when I am in a crosswalk trying to get across the street. I believe this is the most common urban pedestrian accident. Second is a-holes turning right without stopping, especially where it is less than a hard 90 degree turn.
And I do not cross mid block. I'll walk two blocks out of my way to use a light or at least a flasher.

Ha
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:52 PM   #59
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Hmmm... Light or flasher?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg light.jpg (7.2 KB, 201 views)
File Type: jpg Flasher.jpg (9.4 KB, 201 views)
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:54 PM   #60
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I rarely drive anymore, I did not replace my car after some SOB T-boned me while I was making a left turn. I never liked L turns in traffic. I am also very careful to keep my eyes on drivers making left turns when I am in a crosswalk trying to get across the street. I believe this is the most common urban pedestrian accident. Second is a-holes turning right without stopping, especially where it is less than a hard 90 degree turn.
And I do not cross mid block. I'll walk two blocks out of my way to use a light or at least a flasher.

Ha

Yeah, I bet a flasher would stop traffic... :-P

The motto for DFW drivers is "no move is too stupid, no move is too dangerous". People will stop in the dumbest places, and sometimes back up, to make a u-turn. And then there's the "cross three lanes of traffic" to get to the off ramp. And the red light runners, of which there are many...
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