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Request input on giving my retirement notice
Old 01-25-2013, 01:25 PM   #1
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Request input on giving my retirement notice

As my 3/1 ER date nears, excitement is building...and I must confess some butterflies in the stomach as well. I have only been with the company 2+ years, and have no love for the company. So, I am only giving 2 weeks notice. Here's my question: the significant reason (but by no means the only one) for my ER is my health. I am currently healthy but I have a chronic illness that will likely impact me later in life.
One of my current job duties is running a ton of monthly reports. Frankly, in the short term my company would have a hard time finding someone else able to do those reports. I want to parlay that into some extra part-time income -2 days' pay per month -from the company after I leave.
So, do I just say that I am retiring, include the fact that health reasons are part of the reason I am retiring, and/or offer to continue to do those monthly reports [vs watiing to see if they ask me to do so]?
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:34 PM   #2
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Sounds good - although I might consider giving a little longer notice than two weeks to go along with your offer to stay on part-time. Only you know your work situation but to an employer a bit longer (3-4 weeks) notice might give the appearance of being concerned about the time to find and train a replacement. Could put you in a better light - or backfire and give sufficient training time to eliminate the need for your part time services.

As I said, only you can judge how the company would view this.
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:34 PM   #3
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I don't really know the etiquette when it comes to telling your boss you're retiring, as I've only ever just left j*bs for other j*bs with 2 week notice.

However, I would say that asking for the part time contract work for those monthly reports is prudent. I don't necessarily think an employer would care to ask you about that. If you do ask for the part-time work, it might be worth a little explanation as to why (you're retiring because of your health). You probably don't need to go into much detail, but I bet your manager would appreciate it.

Congrats on ER.
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:39 PM   #4
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Not sure what I would say but I definitely would not say anything about my health.
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Old 01-25-2013, 02:39 PM   #5
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Not sure what I would say but I definitely would not say anything about my health.
I believe I would just say that you are leaving due to family reasons. That covers a lot of ground and I don't think they would have a need or want to probe further.
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Old 01-25-2013, 02:51 PM   #6
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I would give a month's notice, perhaps a little more.

I would suggest to your boss that the company could realize an expense reduction by contracting you for few days and perhaps redistrubuting the remaining workload. If he agrees, make sure you let him peddle the suggestion to his boss so that he can take credit for it. After all, your boss will hopefully become your customer/client.

That way there will be a"win' for both of you in this.

I an a big believer in parting company with an employer on the best possible terms. Tou never know what the future will bring.
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Old 01-25-2013, 03:24 PM   #7
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I have only been with the company 2+ years, and have no love for the company. And they probably know that. So, I am only giving 2 weeks notice. How long you've been there isn't a big factor in how much notice you should give. You haven't told us anything about the job, but I'd normally expect 3-4 weeks for any professional position.

One of my current job duties is running a ton of monthly reports. Frankly, in the short term my company would have a hard time finding someone else able to do those reports. You could be different, but IME almost all employees from CEO on down (grossly) overestimate how hard it will be to replace them. It's a PITA to replace someone who only gives 2 weeks notice, but I/we handled it without missing a beat whenever the situation happened to me. How long did it take you to learn the monthly reports, and who taught you (well enough to at least get by)?

I want to parlay that into some extra part-time income -2 days' pay per month -from the company after I leave. So, do I just say that I am retiring, include the fact that health reasons are part of the reason I am retiring, and/or offer to continue to do those monthly reports [vs watiing to see if they ask me to do so]? Sounds like a low probability. If you gave me 2 weeks notice and then asked about PT, I am sure we'd find a way to do without you. If you want a little more money, work another month and you'll net 11 months worth or PT pay. They're aren't going to need you part time for very long...

But you're the only one who could know as you and others have said.
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Old 01-25-2013, 03:50 PM   #8
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I am basically a +1 with Midpack...

If you are on a lower level, which it seems like if you are just running reports.... then they would probably not even ask you to work PT... If you quit, then you are gone... why keep you

Now, if you go in with the PT as your goal, then the conversation is a whole lot different...

So, here is what I see using your statement...


"Bob, I am quitting this company. I really never liked it here and my health is not that good. So, I will am giving you my two week notice."

(you now wait to see if he brings up PT work.... which he does not, so you continue)

But, I know that I do a lot of monthly reports and I thought that I could work a few days every month to churn these out for you. What do you say?"...


IMO, he did not even listen to your last sentence....

SO, try it this way....

"Bob, I have been having a few medical issues (which you do not have to specify) and would like to reduce my hours. Monthly I run a lot of reports over a few days and wondered if we could reduce my schedule down to just those days. What do you say?"

Now, his thought is on you going PT instead of out the door under the first example....

But, you have to be albe to live with either outcome... he might not want a PT person no matter what....
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:22 PM   #9
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Sounds like a low probability. If you gave me 2 weeks notice and then asked about PT, I am sure we'd find a way to do without you. If you want a little more money, work another month and you'll net 11 months worth or PT pay. They're aren't going to need you part time for very long...

But you're the only one who could know as you and others have said.
While I don't disagree with the general sentiment...it also depends on the situation. about this time 3 years ago I have notice that I wanted to retire in a few months (given my situation and responsibilities, I felt that more notice was appropriate and I had no fear of being prematurely retired). I was actually asked to continue working on a very part-time basis (one day a week). I'm sure they could have managed without me, but the person I worked with the most didn't really want to manage entirely without me. 3 years later, I'm still working very part-time. (I do freely admit my situation was perhaps atypical).
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:30 PM   #10
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Thanks, all. My ego requires me to make a clarification -- I am in middle management. The monthly reports are not my primary responsibility, and running them is considerably more than just hitting a button. We're not a big company so for the short term there is likely no one else to run them. If I gave a full month's notice, that might give them enough time to ask me to train someone else.
Incidentally, getting paid to do these reports was simply for "mad money" and not part of my retirement financial plan. I'm just giving two weeks notice, will mention that I want to take a step back for personal reasons, and up front ask if they want me to continue doing the reports. If they say yes, aforementioned mad money for me. If no, 2 more days each month to enjoy myself. Win win for me regardless.
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:51 PM   #11
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Thanks, all. My ego requires me to make a clarification -- I am in middle management. The monthly reports are not my primary responsibility, and running them is considerably more than just hitting a button. We're not a big company so for the short term there is likely no one else to run them. If I gave a full month's notice, that might give them enough time to ask me to train someone else.
Incidentally, getting paid to do these reports was simply for "mad money" and not part of my retirement financial plan. I'm just giving two weeks notice, will mention that I want to take a step back for personal reasons, and up front ask if they want me to continue doing the reports. If they say yes, aforementioned mad money for me. If no, 2 more days each month to enjoy myself. Win win for me regardless.
Perfect! Sounds like exactly what I was about to suggest. Well, with one difference - - I still would have suggested giving them at least a month's notice. But you have a better idea than I do of the effect of that in your company, so probably you should do as you think best.
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:55 PM   #12
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Perfect! Sounds like exactly what I was about to suggest. Well, with one difference - - I still would have suggested giving them at least a month's notice. But you have a better idea than I do of the effect of that in your company, so probably you should do as you think best.
+1 Good luck!
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:58 PM   #13
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I think that if you don't enjoy this job, it probably shows, and the moment the boss hears that you plan to ER he will probably jump on that. Who knows, he may be waiting for the opportunity to move a young whippersnapper into the position. I agree with other that the best way to approach this situation is not to mention that you want to quit, but to propose a new, reduced schedule. It can be for "family reasons". No need to get specific about health problems. If the answer is no, you can always ER with the appropriate notice. Two weeks would be short for a management position, it seems to me.
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:11 AM   #14
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I RE'd awhile ago then found something very rewarding. I create and run reports! What I like is that I see the positive change that it drives. Maybe a conversation with your manager would be better. Let them know that you would like a change using your skills. Unless you have things to do when you RE it can be boring.

Just my two cents
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Old 01-26-2013, 04:35 PM   #15
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So, do I just say that I am retiring, include the fact that health reasons are part of the reason I am retiring, and/or offer to continue to do those monthly reports [vs watiing to see if they ask me to do so]?
From the viewpoint of your employer, are you retiring or simply resigning? You've only been there 2+ years and you're only giving 2 weeks notice. Sounds like a simple resignation, from their outlook, regardless of whether you're going to assume a FIRE lifestyle or not.

Despite the fact that you say you have no love for the company, given the fact they employed you and that you hold a professional position, I'd offer up your services to train your replacement either by converting to part time (as you hypothesized) or by giving longer notice so they have time to identify your replacement.

Unless the owners are extremely naive, they'll quickly come to grips with the vulnerability they've allowed to occur in regards to you alone having the knowldge to generate the monthly reports. Your plan to leave on short notice will teach them an important management lesson and they'll be better judges of character and more aware of risky situations going forward. I doubt that continuing their vulnerability by having you do the monthlies part time going forward, and not training someone else, will be part of their plans. But who knows?

Enjoy ER! It's great to hear that you'll be able to hang up the spurs and get on with your life before your health issues make that difficult.
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