Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-08-2014, 05:58 PM   #41
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Singapore
Posts: 4
Dear Jackson D

Thanks for your frank and honest reply. I don't have any medical colleagues of the same age who've retired yet and the earlier generation of doctors believed strongly in dying in the saddle. I couldn't agree more with the sentiment that if one was not imaginative enough to think of sometimes else to do, it would be truly pathetic. Learning a foreign language, keeping fit, travel and management of my portfolio are things that I know will occupy me. But, as you know, we docs have been always brainwashed to believe that our work should always come before anything else. Like "rkser" said, it's not easy to cut the chords to medicine completely....
__________________

__________________
simster is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-08-2014, 07:56 PM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,013
Quote:
Originally Posted by simster View Post
Dear Jackson D

Thanks for your frank and honest reply. I don't have any medical colleagues of the same age who've retired yet and the earlier generation of doctors believed strongly in dying in the saddle. I couldn't agree more with the sentiment that if one was not imaginative enough to think of sometimes else to do, it would be truly pathetic. Learning a foreign language, keeping fit, travel and management of my portfolio are things that I know will occupy me. But, as you know, we docs have been always brainwashed to believe that our work should always come before anything else. Like "rkser" said, it's not easy to cut the chords to medicine completely....
Oh, I don't know. I went into medicine because back in the day when I was making my career choices, it was a socially acceptable way for a woman to become financially independent without having to resort to marriage. I never bought the Kool Aid. Just today someone asked if I missed it and I could honestly say "no".
__________________

__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2014, 09:26 PM   #43
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: San Diego
Posts: 699
I've been out for a year and a half too. I'm waffling over renewing my license. I feel somewhat guilty, but I sure sleep a lot better. My spouse got lucky with some stock options and we wound up pulling the plug a few years earlier than originally planned. I've found plenty to do during the day, but early arthritis has started to limit my mobility, so all in all I'm glad I quit when I did.
__________________
AllDone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2014, 11:28 PM   #44
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Singapore
Posts: 4
Thanks for all your helpful comments. Meadbh, AllDone - do you mind if I ask how many years of practice you'd put in before you decided it was enough ?

I find clinical practice OK most days, screamingly exasperating once in a while and maybe a few times a year, really rewarding.
__________________
simster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2014, 11:59 PM   #45
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,013
32 years.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 09:17 AM   #46
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 35
I was in practice 27 years and for the last few years the good parts were overcome by the hassles. It was a classic case of burnout. Cutting back to 4 days per week helped quite a bit at first but that didn't last too long. I realized how much better I felt when I was away from work so I finally got on with my new life.
__________________
Jackson D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 11:38 AM   #47
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: San Diego
Posts: 699
19 years, I did some software engineering first. I liked IT because it was very creative, but there were a lot of divas in the field (really divos) and some issues with being a girl among all the boys. Medicine was more collegial, but I was starting to burn out and working with a guy who was really burned out. The money was not substantially different. Medical school was really, really fun and 2nd and 3rd year of residency were pretty good too. Intern year sucked.

My aunt, who is only a couple of years older tham me, flies to a medically underserved area for 2-4 days at a time a few times per month and seems hapoy with that.
__________________
AllDone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 11:44 AM   #48
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,065
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllDone View Post
My aunt, who is only a couple of years older tham me, flies to a medically underserved area for 2-4 days at a time a few times per month and seems hapoy with that.
I hope she's a medical professional and not some strange tourist with a sick idea of the perfect travel destination...
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 08:33 PM   #49
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 711
Today is the six week anniversary of my exit from medicine. Out and under age 55. Obviously it is still early, but I do not miss it at all. I have no trouble finding stuff to occupy me, and I am actually amazed how a day just slips right by. I am loving the freedom. I am studying a new language, going to museums for lectures and special daytime programs, cooking more and exercising much more regularly. I look good and feel even better. Check me out in a year. For now, everything that I had hoped is true. It is awesomely good.

I will say I have discovered something completely unexpected and a bit unpleasant. My wife (by choice, not necessity) is still a physician. Now, as the non physician spouse of a doctor, I have a new understanding and appreciation of the challenges of having a doctor as a spouse. It does serve as a regular reminder of why I am so glad to not be in medicine anymore. I hope she gets jealous and quits soon.

I completely agree with those who say that there is a "kool aid" that doctors drink that gets them hooked on the recognition, or the power or the calling or whatever that frankly never really took with me. Or it wore off really fast. And +1 enthusiastically that one who cannot find ways to challenge oneself is just PATHETIC. Absolute nonsense that an intelligent person in this day and age could not find any other distraction than those provided by medicine. Bah! And good riddance. Burned out? Scorched. 3rd degree.
__________________
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2014, 03:55 AM   #50
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 14
Congratulations on the wonderful new chapter of your life. Your story is inspiring and I hope to be there soon. I am a relatively new physician, out in practice for 6 years. Although I do love my job and my patients, I do not like the daily grind and the schedule my family has to be on due to my work. I have young children and it breaks my heart that I cannot be as involved in their lives as I'd like to be now. I am hoping in a few years, before their high school years, I can pull the plug and not look back. I never really drank the Kool aid either since what we have now is sure a lot more than what my parents ever had. Hubby, who is not a physician, is planning to continue to work to support some of the "lifestyle" (this is his own choice since he likes "stuff" more than I do). When I went into medicine, I thought that I would work forever. Since having kids, my views have definitely changed. I want to spend more time with them and also be able to travel and do things with my husband before we are not able to physically. Thanks for the inspiring story and I will definitely check out your blog.
__________________
darly2004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Retired Doctor 1 year anniversary
Old 04-13-2014, 07:38 PM   #51
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 711
Retired Doctor 1 year anniversary

This post was edited to remove redundant info from an earlier post in this same thread...i meant to use that info in another thread about docs retiring..still this retains the relevant i fo that is cited below...

I do feel the stress of having less money coming in--even though if my wife stopped working I think we are more than comfortable where we are with our usual spending being around 3% of our portfolio (with over two years safety in cash or CD's that combined are earning over 2% interest) and this is without touching the value of our home equity of $700,000 and my hope we will downsize and at least have lower maintenance costs even if we roll our equity into a higher priced but warmer part of the country. The other thing that amazes me is the series of unfortunate and unusual expenses that have befallen us in this first 4 months- each of us needing root canal for the first time, a broken tooth, an ER visit for stitches, frozen broken pipes, a dryer repair, leaky sink, new timing belt needed, some new tires...I am hoping to see these death by a thousand cuts expenses taper off for a while, but who knows? If my wife were not still providing it would be even more unsettling no matter how much cushion I think we have.
__________________
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2014, 10:58 PM   #52
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills
Posts: 137
Sorry to hear of your short term unlucky streak urn2bfree. It is a sobering reminder that there are no absolute guarantees no matter how well you prepare. On the other hand same can be said about your ability to enjoy retirement if you wait another 10 years.

As yet another rapidly burning out MD in practice for 28 years contemplating ER this thread has been therapeutic for me. Although I have never been particularly fond of Kool Aid the evil elixir has affected me. It hurts that I may walk away feeling somewhat defeated by my years in practice. Hope that goes away as my time and energy are reclaimed after FIRE.

Have had 2 colleagues in my group retire in the past 3 years. Actually one of the 2 in process now. One retired at 59. At 2 years out is very happy with his decision. The other retiring now is 75. He has lived life on his own terms, had secure enough finances to retire FIRE several times over 20 years ago, says he has no regrets but has very little left in the tank to enjoy life with. It was sad watching him deal with the changes in medicine over the last 5 years. He waited at least 10 years too long. I can see in his eyes that now he is thinking "AND FOR WHAT"?. He thought that retiring at 59 was a terrible mistake for my other colleague. He has no idea that I will likely not make it to 59 before FIRE. Will not tell him until after he is long gone as it is assumed I will follow in his footsteps for at least 10 more years.

Jackson D. Congratulations. Your blog is now on my short reading list.
__________________
longranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 06:21 AM   #53
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,469
This thread is helpful to us me and other professionals, who tend to be pressured to define who we are by what we do. My medical director who was trying to get me to do more stuff said "You're a pediatrician." I never could think of myself as "a doctor." If we think of ourselves as our profession, then retirement is a tragedy, almost a defeat. I'm not there yet but it seems here we treat retirement as a victory, a liberation.


I too have been told I need to retire to something else. Like Jackson D, I'll need to unwind before the something else shows up. I can't wait!
__________________
EastWest Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 08:52 AM   #54
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,414
Thank you for all of the posts. I am three weeks away from officially packing it in 2 days before my 53rd birthday. I have always enjoyed the patients and teaching but the admin side at the hospital is killer. Looking forward to the garden, cottage, traveling and quality time with the family.
__________________
6miths is online now   Reply With Quote
A Question for Doc ?
Old 04-16-2014, 07:04 AM   #55
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 123
A Question for Doc ?

Hi Doc,

I am semi retired, 57 yr old physician , in private practice 3 days a week, yearning for a full retirement one day.

How did you get Medical Insurance as a retired doc ?

Thanks and regards
__________________
rkser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 09:04 AM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by longranger View Post
........It hurts that I may walk away feeling somewhat defeated by my years in practice........
No reason to feel that way. Actually, congrats are in order. You have devoted almost 3 decades of your life to the most noble effort of tending to the sick & injured. Thank you for your service!! I would never view a future decision to retire or change directions as a defeat.
__________________
ERhoosier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 10:13 AM   #57
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills
Posts: 137
Most of my feeling defeated or guilty is for not being able to influence the highest levels of the government/megacorp healthcare complex in a rational direction, as irrational as that is. In reality my negative feelings are based largely on the egotistical premise that I SHOULD be part of the good guys that slay the dragons that are making our healthcare system ill. Most of the doctors in positions of leadership I have worked with have a pretty good idea what needs to change in healthcare, are not hostile to realities of the business world. Unfortunately the government and megacorp interests that reap huge financial gain from the systems current structure have an odd mixture of ignorance to the effects of what they are doing and criminal disregard for the negatives they can understand. That may sound overly dramatic but I think you would here the same opinion from most individuals who are patient advocates and have been asked to function as the token MD on boards, in think tanks etc... You can lead the horses to water but..........................
__________________
longranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 10:37 AM   #58
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,013
Longranger, it's very frustrating to know what needs to be done but to be powerless to implement it. Healthcare is highly politicized and there are multiple agendas and power structures that are much bigger than individuals, even leaders in healthcare. That's not to say that leading and facilitating improvement is not possible; indeed it is, within one's scope of practice and influence, and that is very satisfying. But there comes a time when it's OK to step off the treadmill and forget about saving the world. You've earned it.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 01:26 PM   #59
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,629
Agree with Meadbh, but no reason stepping away from day-to-day clinical medicine requires forgetting about "saving the world". In fact, many docs have deliberately left at the top of their clinical games in attempts to have a greater impact on improving peoples lives (e.g. becoming legislators, lecturers, authors, volunteers, etc.). Others just get so burnout by the frustrating, often irrational bureaucratic overhead of 'modern' clinical medicine that they need major time (months,even years) to decompress & recharge before finding new pursuits. There are many ways to have positive impact on the world beyond clinical medicine.
__________________
ERhoosier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 02:03 PM   #60
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills
Posts: 137
Thanks for the understanding and advice ERhoosier and Meadbh. Sorry to all for my earlier rant of sorts. Your observations and advice hit the nail on the head. Hopefully after Fire and time to recharge I will find pathways to be more at peace, contribute to society or feel at ease doing nothing in particular at all. That why I have been reading every post on this site since I found it and will continue to do so as my FIRE plans progress.
__________________

__________________
longranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:41 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.