Join Early Retirement Today
View Poll Results: What does it mean to be retired? You can call yourself retired only if...
You do not work at all, no volunteer work and no paid work 8 5.80%
Volunteer work is ok, but no paid work at all 56 40.58%
Volunteer work or part time paid work is ok 18 13.04%
Any amount of volunteer or paid work is ok if you want to do it and you are financially independent 56 40.58%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-25-2016, 07:06 AM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,445
I got tired, so I took a little rest. But now I'm retired.
__________________

__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-25-2016, 07:12 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,041
I'd consider one retired if they receive a pension or social security. Pretty much means your career or work is not a integral part of your life anymore.

With more reflection.....the second sentence above would be primary.
__________________

__________________
RE2Boys is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 07:26 AM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 3,873
I am FI and have been retired since late 2008. I do some volunteer work although they throw a few dollars ($25-$50) and a leftover pizza pie my way to compensate me for my time which is a few days a year, and gasoline. My best friend gives me $100 a year for the time I spend helping him with his investments following a large inheritance back in 2012. I had already been doing his income taxes since 2002. Most of the stuff I do for him is from home. I also do some once-a-year volunteer stuff for my co-op's annual meeting and Board elections, a meeting I would attend anyway. I don't think doing any of that stuff makes me any less "retired" than if I hadn't been doing it.
__________________
Retired in late 2008 at age 45. Cashed in company stock, bought a lot of shares in a big bond fund and am living nicely off its dividends. IRA, SS, and a pension await me at age 60 and later. No kids, no debts.

"I want my money working for me instead of me working for my money!"
scrabbler1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 08:50 AM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,577
Retired is being able to do whatever I want with my time because that's the way I want to spend it and for no other reason.

Retirement is doing the things I want to do.

I like my part time consulting, I like my volunteer activities, I like studying, I like exercising, I like catching up with people (in small doses), I like writing, I like reading and if I didn't like them I'd do something else - retirement is that freedom.
__________________
Budgeting is a skill practised by people who are bad at politics.
traineeinvestor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 10:14 AM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: N/A
Posts: 55
I concur with "Traineeinvestor" and say that Retirement for me is simply having the financial and personal freedom to choose. That's it, period the end.
__________________
Balance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 10:31 AM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balance View Post
I concur with "Traineeinvestor" and say that Retirement for me is simply having the financial and personal freedom to choose. That's it, period the end.
Pretty much this. Retirement can be vastly different depending on the person. I am perfectly happy to sit at home and not do a damn thing. My DW on the other hand is always GO GO GO. We are about to depart for some Caribbean travel and I am already worn out thinking about all the stuff the DW is going to want to do. Oye..I think I need to take a nap.
__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 11:24 AM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,202
I'm not crazy about labels, but some of you working part-time more than a few hours a year sound "semi-retired" to me. But who cares what you call it, it is whatever it is. I mean, if there was something I enjoyed that I could get paid for and more or less set my own schedule, I'd jump on it without worrying whether I could still call myself retired. Also, I think some people view retirement as leaving the career they were doing, whether or not you do something else like being a landlord or other part-time work different from your career. I can see that either way.

I don't think drudgery, enjoyment or FI really applies to the definition. If I'm retired and am bored to death with retirement, I'm still retired. And if I'm working full time at something I really enjoy and can walk away anytime I like, there's no way I can see calling that retirement.

For volunteering, I took that to mean not full time volunteering work.

I voted for volunteering ok, no paid work at all, but as I type this out I'm thinking that part-time paid work is ok, with the caveat that it's not a career extension. I worked part-time for about 2-3 years at the same job I'd had before, was FI, and definitely did not consider myself retired until I got completely out.
__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 11:40 AM   #28
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,950
Like everyone I have my own personal idea of what retirement really is (as a member, not as an Admin). My definition is not meant to invalidate anyone else's definition, and it comes with no guarantees of even being correct.

When you have enough money to be able to choose working or not working, to me that is being FI (financially independent).

When you are FI *AND* you make the choice to stop working forever, to me that is retirement.

When you are retired and you decide to start "working" at a part time job that doesn't pay much of anything, just for fun and to keep your mind occupied, that is not working; that is playing.

However, if you are convinced that you are retired, then I am not going to argue it even if you are working 120 hours/week for a 6 figure salary.
**************************************************

On the other hand, I really HATE how the English language is becoming so much less precise and overly fluid due to people insisting on redefining English words whenever doing that is convenient to them. So here is a definition I just found by Googling "retirement":
Quote:
re·tire·ment
rəˈtī(ə)rmənt/
noun
noun: retirement; plural noun: retirements

1. the action or fact of leaving one's job and ceasing to work.
"a man nearing retirement"
  • the period of one's life after leaving one's job and ceasing to work.
    "he spent much of his retirement traveling in Europe"
  • the action or fact of ceasing to play a sport competitively.

2. the withdrawal of a jury from the courtroom to decide their verdict.
(red emphasis mine)
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 12:10 PM   #29
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
On the other hand, I really HATE how the English language is becoming so much less precise and overly fluid due to people insisting on redefining English words whenever doing that is convenient to them.
Exactly. That was the point of my post and my poll. Everyone is entitled to their own view of what it means to be retired, but when different people use the same word in a conversation while attaching different meanings to that word, then the conversation is less meaningful. (I call words like that "suitcase words" because people pack whatever meaning they want into the word and that meaning may be different than the meaning you pack into the word.)

For example, someone may announce that they are retiring in the Class of 2016, but if they are defining retired as "any amount of paid work is ok so long as you want to do it and you are financially independent" then what they are really saying is that they have reached financial independence in 2016 but they may choose to continue working. I am not passing judgment as to whether that is good or bad, I think it's great if that person wants to continue working, but the point is that some people might disagree that someone who reaches FI and continues to work because they want to counts as being retired.
__________________
JustCurious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 12:27 PM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,331
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustCurious View Post
someone may announce that they are retiring in the Class of 2016,
Perhaps they are indicating that they are shy, quiet, and unassuming?
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 12:29 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Katsmeow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,400
I made the 4th choice. I understand each person has a different definition of it. I saw that I semi-retired in 2010. I went from working full-time to working in the office 1 day a week and doing occasional work from home. I have kept that it up in one form or another since then. In my highest paid year, I made almost $100k doing this. That year definitely didn't feel like retirement to me, although I could have quit at any time. And, in fact, I eventually went in and said I was tired of the commute (even 1 or 2 days a week) and was just going to quit entirely.

But, then I was offered the opportunity to work from home entirely. Since then I've done that (going to the office about once a year). Since then I've varied greatly in how much I do. Sometimes I average 3 or 4 hours in a month. Other times I average 20 or 30 hours in a month. The thing is that it is really up to me. I don't have to do anything. I am free to decline a project if I want to.

At this point, the amount of money is pretty trivial, but I do it more to help out colleagues than anything else From a financial standpoint, I could quit tomorrow and it would make no substantive difference.
__________________
Katsmeow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 12:30 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2017ish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
....

On the other hand, I really HATE how the English language is becoming so much less precise and overly fluid due to people insisting on redefining English words whenever doing that is convenient to them. ...
Yep. It is being decimated. (That one makes me grit my teeth, but english is a mongrel child of generations of bastardization. Overall, we've got a large and quite flexible toolbox--no matter how much I hate some of the common usage!)
__________________
OMY * 3 2ish Done 7.28.17
2017ish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 01:40 PM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Houston
Posts: 285
I'm leaving my megacorp job in seven weeks. I have told folks that I would come back to consult on certain projects. I have (half-jokingly) told them that for the work that's interesting I would charge $X per hour, and for the work that I consider drudgery, I would charge $10*X.


If I decide to do some work for $X, I will still be retired, but if I ever agree to do the $10*X work, it will be back to the grind.
__________________
Slow But Steady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 01:50 PM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,425
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjquantz View Post
Retired - Being in a state where your time is truly yours. Any claims on your time are accepted by you in a fully voluntary manner, whether or not $$ are attached.

I like this. As per the definition above, I have left my high paying job and I can chose to do whatever I want with my time with no regard to whether it is paid or not. Working in the garden, fixing things around the house, helping others learn for little or no monetary reward or even doing what I used to do as a volunteer... is this 'work'? I think not (It sure doesn't feel like what used to be 'work'). Am I retired? I think so!
__________________
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 02:08 PM   #35
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Cobra9777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,138
For me, it simply means that I quit work after achieving FI and have no intention of seeking employment ever again unless it's just something I decide to do for fun in my spare time... which is highly unlikely.
__________________
Retired at 52 in July 2013. On to better things...
AA: 55% stock, 15% real estate, 27% bonds, 3% cash
WR: 2.0% SI: 2 pensions, some rental income, SS later
Cobra9777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 03:08 PM   #36
Full time employment: Posting here.
old woman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 551
To me it means quitting work and not depending on someone else to support me. I retired twice before I was 25 once to be a housewife and once cashed out retirement and quit job then decided to go to college full time. I was married to a man who didn't want me to work and didn't actually intend to work but hard to say you are retired at 22 and broke. I started working again in 1974-2014 then retired again. This time, FI, SS, Medicare, tossed all old copies of resume, not keeping up with current issues so probably couldn't get hired again if I tried. If I work for money ever again it will be pocket change but I don't see wanting to do that.
__________________
old woman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 05:20 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,467
I retired completely in 2012 for about 7 months. Then I was asked to teach a course at the university which is something I had never done. My career was not in teaching at all. It is online and I am totally free to work on it when I want, etc. It never interferes with my schedule, vacations, etc. I consider myself semi-retired. This has really been an unexpected joy to be doing this. so fun!
__________________
Teacher Terry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 05:53 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
the action or fact of leaving one's job and ceasing to work.
The action or fact of leaving one's job and ceasing to get paid. I work my butt off around the house and garden, plus my DD's house.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 05:58 PM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I really HATE how the English language is becoming so much less precise and overly fluid due to people insisting on redefining English words whenever doing that is convenient to them. So here is a definition I just found by Googling "retirement":
(red emphasis mine)
So I take it that you don't like the new and improved meaning of LITERALLY?

...used for emphasis or to express strong feeling while not being literally true.


Amazing, huh?

Literally | Definition of Literally by Merriam-Webster
__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2016, 07:34 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,533
I think people often use "retired" colloquially to mean the Webster's definition "leaving one's job and ceasing to get paid" even when they pick up another kind of work post-retirement. Everyone knows a retired police/firefighter/military guy/gal in their 40's or 50's that does some PI work, odd jobs, landscaping, woodworking, etc, right? Nothing full time, not always that well paid, sometimes just puttering around a shop or a business to pass the time and have folks to BS with.

They might say "I'm retired" and that means "I'm retired [from my former full time career]".
__________________

__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Job description: What does "Deals well with ambiguity" mean? RISP Young Dreamers 43 06-23-2014 09:27 AM
What does "Don't lose money" mean? km4hr FIRE and Money 8 10-12-2008 02:50 PM
What does "discount future promises" mean? pedorrero FIRE and Money 3 12-15-2007 09:19 PM
What does semi-retired mean? windsurf Other topics 3 02-14-2007 05:14 PM
What does the term "ER" mean to U? rs0460a Other topics 36 06-10-2006 09:19 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:05 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.