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Old 07-17-2013, 07:30 AM   #121
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Asia seemed to do a better job at meeting the US palate for such things than Europe however (one of my best steaks ever in my life was in Taiwan--imported from the US)
Same here - great steak can always be found easily in Taiwan! My wife is Taiwanese and we plan to retire there, so this discussion got me thinking. They have Costco's, Ikea's, big department stores in the major cities and convenience stores on every corner. So it's hard to think of what I would miss. Internet service in Taiwan is a huge leap ahead of the US. I am used to the typical Asian diet so there's not much food I will miss. All in all I think life will actually be much more convenient there. The biggest thing I think I will miss is the (mostly) orderly driving in the US. Driving in Taiwan is chaotic without much regard for the law, personal safety, or the safety of others.
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:50 AM   #122
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I am visiting the USA at the moment and visited Silicon Valley and Yosemite to see friends. I was using buses all over Silicon Valley and also using the airlines and I noticed just how polite Americans typically are to each other. It is an adjustment for me.
Because I've travelled so much, I've heard a lot of foreigners say that Americans are the most polite but not very easy to get to know or befriend. In the developed world I would rate Canada as the friendliest and easiest to get to know. I've noticed that Americans are way nicer to each other in public than just about anywhere I've been or lived. Since you don't know what other's are packing, you better be nice here. As for the French, they can tell you anything without fear that you'd pull out the automatic.
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Old 07-17-2013, 08:33 AM   #123
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Everywhere we've traveled and lived, we've found something to remember fondly, and something we miss. Not just me, the entire family. Occasionally when we get together we talk about places we would like to return to and visit once again, the kids immediately recalling specific restaurants or dishes.

The same with people. Only one time have we ever traveled and found the locals anything other than friendly. That was China, and I still think it was more our inability to adapt and communicate. Otherwise, around the US and the world there are lots of nice, and well mannered people willing to lend a hand and share a kind thought.

We have indeed been fortunate.
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Old 07-17-2013, 10:46 AM   #124
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Because I've travelled so much, I've heard a lot of foreigners say that Americans are the most polite but not very easy to get to know or befriend. In the developed world I would rate Canada as the friendliest and easiest to get to know. I've noticed that Americans are way nicer to each other in public than just about anywhere I've been or lived. Since you don't know what other's are packing, you better be nice here. ....
Sorry, but this is just hilarious. DH grew up in a town where it was rude not to say hello to everyone and he continues to do so. I really don't think he does it or anyone responds because they fear he is armed.
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:14 PM   #125
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Sorry, but this is just hilarious. DH grew up in a town where it was rude not to say hello to everyone and he continues to do so. I really don't think he does it or anyone responds because they fear he is armed.
Come on. You really took this seriously.
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:20 PM   #126
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Sorry, but this is just hilarious. DH grew up in a town where it was rude not to say hello to everyone and he continues to do so. I really don't think he does it or anyone responds because they fear he is armed.
This also means you have to do the raised hand to drivers going in the opposite direction.
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:09 PM   #127
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I'm not a steak fan (more of a burger eater). But the best steak I ever had was in Buenos Aires, Argentina, a place that has a history of good beef.
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:53 PM   #128
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It wouldn't be correct to list this as something I'd miss about the UK, as I have lived in the US for over 25 years, and this was introduced to the UK since I left. However, whenever I go back, I make sure to have a good balti. I daresay there may be the odd one or two balti restaurants in the US but if so, they are very few and far between, and the Indian food in the UK is much better due, I assume, to the greater competition in Britain.

You really can't beat a good balti.
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Old 07-20-2013, 10:15 PM   #129
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Although I am of Filipino ancestry, and can easily mingle with the people in Manila, I decided to retire in the USA. After living in the US for about 40 years I will miss a lot of things.
1. Health care access.
2. My kids are Americans and are here, so why live away in another country?
3. My Ford F150 truck.
4. Super Walmart, Costco, other stores.
5. Freedom of road travel to see anything you can see in other countries.
6. Security of being US citizen living in the USA which may be in peril abroad.
7. Medicare and other benefits.
8. America is such a big country, you can choose whatever you like and make it work your way.
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Old 07-31-2013, 07:44 AM   #130
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I have been living in Thailand now for 10 years and I never really missed anything much until recently. These days, I think I miss the Western thought process about business and customer satisfaction ideas that I saw in the US. Return policies, warranties that were honored, and getting what you pay for. For example, in the US, a business owner is happy when you patronize his business and thanks you for doing so. I just had a Thai friend that owns a business here tell me that customers should be thanking him for providing them his products and services. I just do not get that. Do not get me wrong, I am happy here. However, I have pretty much given up and having those expectations.

Now that I think about it, I could sure go for some Folgers dark roast coffee and can you get Costco to open a branch here?
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:51 AM   #131
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Although I am of Filipino ancestry, and can easily mingle with the people in Manila, I decided to retire in the USA. After living in the US for about 40 years I will miss a lot of things.
1. Health care access.
2. My kids are Americans and are here, so why live away in another country?
3. My Ford F150 truck.
4. Super Walmart, Costco, other stores.
5. Freedom of road travel to see anything you can see in other countries.
6. Security of being US citizen living in the USA which may be in peril abroad.
7. Medicare and other benefits.
8. America is such a big country, you can choose whatever you like and make it work your way.
I totally agree with all the points, except that in 2., my kids are Indians, and in 3., mine is a 1995 Toyota Corolla, the best Corolla ever manufactured I am of Indian origin (now 71 and just retired), but have lived in the US for over 22 years and I am now an American Citizen. Although I can mingle with folks in my country of origin, I somehow feel more a part of the folks in this country!

The best thing about America, as I always believed, is that "here, every relationship between two individuals starts on a foundation of trust" (That is my own quote). No expectations, no judgements...

That trust may turn to mistrust later, if either party breaks the trust; but that is OK. It is always a "painless" and happy start! And if no one breaks the trust the relationship remains solid for life!!

It is just the opposite in India and some other Asian countries I have traveled. It is always a painful start, and the pain can last for a long time until a level of trust develops!

To me, that relationship IS the "conversation" referred by another member in an earlier post. I will miss this conversation if I am anywhere else.
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Old 07-31-2013, 07:16 PM   #132
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I have been living in Thailand now for 10 years and I never really missed anything much until recently. These days, I think I miss the Western thought process about business and customer satisfaction ideas that I saw in the US. Return policies, warranties that were honored, and getting what you pay for. For example, in the US, a business owner is happy when you patronize his business and thanks you for doing so. I just had a Thai friend that owns a business here tell me that customers should be thanking him for providing them his products and services. I just do not get that. Do not get me wrong, I am happy here. However, I have pretty much given up and having those expectations.

Now that I think about it, I could sure go for some Folgers dark roast coffee and can you get Costco to open a branch here?
Great post!! I can really relate to this.
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Old 08-01-2013, 02:04 PM   #133
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...
1. Health care access. NO
2. My kids are Americans and are here, so why live away in another country? AIRLINES MAKE EVERYWHERE CLOSE.
3. My Ford F150 truck. WELL MY EXPLORER MAYBE
4. Super Walmart, Costco, other stores. THERE ARE MANY OTHER GOOD STORES/CHAINS.
5. Freedom of road travel to see anything you can see in other countries. SAME IN MANY COUNTRIES.
6. Security of being US citizen living in the USA which may be in peril abroad. HUH?
7. Medicare and other benefits. LOTS OF COMPARABLE SYSTEMS.
8. America is such a big country, you can choose whatever you like and make it work your way. THIS IS PROBABLY THE ONE TRUTH. ONLY AUSTRALIA COMES CLOSE BUT LACKS THE CULTURAL VARIETY.
But if it makes you feel good staying at home, go for it!
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Old 08-02-2013, 11:35 AM   #134
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I have my reservations about #1 and #7 (even though we have a pretty good set-up ourselves right now), but no issues with the rest. It is hard to beat the USA.

'Any road', we get around today and, very likely, a wee bit after w*rking is over.

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Old 08-02-2013, 11:41 AM   #135
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Jdev, thanks for your insight. It may seem like a small thing to some, but it can make a big difference when you move to a new place. Well stated.
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Old 11-13-2013, 05:52 PM   #136
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I live in Bay Area, CA. It's a wonderful place and I would miss most of it. It'd be easier to list what I would not miss.

I would not miss traffic. I would not miss the high cost of living. I would not miss newer immigrants from 3rd world countries since I would most likely be an ex-pat from one of those countries. I would not miss the fast paced life.

I looked into ex-pat living. I think people who can live there are the rare venturesome type or desperate ones (no sufficient retirement fund to live well in USA). If you can afford ER in the USA, I am not sure walking into Nicaragua with all its pitfalls (language barrier, e.g) is going to work for vast majority of us. Be FIRED and enjoy traveling - that's my take.
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:16 PM   #137
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I live in Bay Area, CA. It's a wonderful place and I would miss most of it. It'd be easier to list what I would not miss...
+1, and all I need to change is your location to my present location. And my list would be different and probably shorter than yours. I am easy to please I guess.

PS. OK. Here it is. I would not miss the 120F heat of summer.

Oh wait! That's why I bought a 2nd home in the same state, but at 7000 ft for summer escapes. So scratch that. I am 100% content.
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Old 11-13-2013, 07:48 PM   #138
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Actually, we met several US expats in Costa Rica who retired early left the US because of #1. They had access, the real issue was affordability. It was not within their means.

We also stayed at a B&B in San Jose, Costa Rica. It catered to US citizens who flew down to have medical procedures done in Costa Rica because they cannot afford to have them done in the US.
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Old 11-14-2013, 08:40 AM   #139
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1) Family
2) Friends
3) Connection to what I consider home with all its comfortable familiarity

I would think becoming an expat would just be trading one set of issues for another. I guess I prefer the devil I know.
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Old 11-14-2013, 08:42 AM   #140
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1) Family
2) Friends
3) Connection to what I consider home with all its comfortable familiarity

I would think becoming an expat would just be trading one set of issues for another. I guess I prefer the devil I know.
This I show I see it also, at least now. Most places in America offer a pretty nice life.

Ha
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