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Old 04-24-2015, 03:27 PM   #41
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I'm still a consultant to my former company, where I retired 13 months ago. I've worked about 30 hours in these 13 months. I should only have about 20 hours left and should wrap up the gig this year. I would consider doing some other work if it was exciting, but nothing has presented itself yet.
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:31 PM   #42
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I have been working a part-time job, 3 days per week, for the last 5 years. I will have earned enough for my 40th quarter for social security purposes on 5/8/15 and will stop working 5/15/15. I am looking forward to not having a schedule again.
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Old 05-01-2015, 05:05 AM   #43
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I received a surprise call from a professor at a local university asking me if I would be interested in teaching a half semester course at the business school from March to early May. I thought it might be an interesting change, as well as a new challenge, so I agreed to teach two sessions.

I completely underestimated the time required for preparation, grading assignments and tests, as well as holding office hours. My standards are high, so I poured tremendous time and effort into the development of materials, lectures and assignments on a crunch timetable. Due to my late hire date, two weeks before classes started, and my inexperience teaching in the classroom, it has been a struggle to stay a couple of sessions ahead of the class. I can see how teaching the course a second time would be much easier and less time consuming.

I'm appalled at the low work ethic and poor communications skills of the seniors I'm teaching. The school is a prestigious private university with an undergraduate business program ranked in the top 10 nationally. Standards in terms of the amount and quality of work expected of students seem much lower than I remember from my days at a state university 40 years ago. I've received feedback from administrators I'm too demanding.

My observation is most of the foreign students seem to be in class to learn the material. They are always prepared for class and work hard on the assignments. The American students are focused on earning an "A" with as little effort as possible. I'd say half of them come to class without reading the materials. Most of the American students seem to be from affluent middle class families and have yet to experience real challenge and adversity in their lives.

The experience has not been fulfilling and since I don't need the income I won't continue in the fall. I suspect most of my students are in for a rude awakening in another month when they start working for a company and quickly realize they are no longer the center of the universe. Incredibly 95% of the class has jobs as the business school's graduates are in high demand. Of course I may be wrong. Perhaps corporations are less demanding today and willing to lower standards to accommodate the expectations of this generation.

I'm looking forward to completing the grading of final exams and returning to retirement.




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Old 05-01-2015, 11:25 AM   #44
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I've taught a business class at my alma mater off and on for the past 5 years. My first semester teaching mirrors your experience to a tee (mine is also an expensive private university). I was also appalled at the low lovely of writing ability of some of the minority students in my class. BTW most of my students were either seniors or graduate students in either engineering or business.

After I saw a few different classes I realized that that first cohort was a bit of a fluke. Each term do get 1 or 2 students where I wonder how they got accepted to the school and another 2 or 3 that are pretty laxy, but in general I think my students put in reasonable efforts.

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I received a surprise call from a professor at a local university asking me if I would be interested in teaching a half semester course at the business school from March to early May. I thought it might be an interesting change, as well as a new challenge, so I agreed to teach two sessions.

I completely underestimated the time required for preparation, grading assignments and tests, as well as holding office hours. My standards are high, so I poured tremendous time and effort into the development of materials, lectures and assignments on a crunch timetable. Due to my late hire date, two weeks before classes started, and my inexperience teaching in the classroom, it has been a struggle to stay a couple of sessions ahead of the class. I can see how teaching the course a second time would be much easier and less time consuming.

I'm appalled at the low work ethic and poor communications skills of the seniors I'm teaching. The school is a prestigious private university with an undergraduate business program ranked in the top 10 nationally. Standards in terms of the amount and quality of work expected of students seem much lower than I remember from my days at a state university 40 years ago. I've received feedback from administrators I'm too demanding.

My observation is most of the foreign students seem to be in class to learn the material. They are always prepared for class and work hard on the assignments. The American students are focused on earning an "A" with as little effort as possible. I'd say half of them come to class without reading the materials. Most of the American students seem to be from affluent middle class families and have yet to experience real challenge and adversity in their lives.

The experience has not been fulfilling and since I don't need the income I won't continue in the fall. I suspect most of my students are in for a rude awakening in another month when they start working for a company and quickly realize they are no longer the center of the universe. Incredibly 95% of the class has jobs as the business school's graduates are in high demand. Of course I may be wrong. Perhaps corporations are less demanding today and willing to lower standards to accommodate the expectations of this generation.

I'm looking forward to completing the grading of final exams and returning to retirement.




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Old 05-01-2015, 12:36 PM   #45
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We have had most of our income from rentals for decades - went to being snowbirds back in 2010, so we are not on site for 6 or so months/year. When near the rentals I am more employed with them, but we have a manager who handles most of it year round. We still do much of the book work, which keeps us in touch with what is going on and I get called enough for suggestions on repairs or tenant issues that I feel of use. Getting tired of the rentals - don't want to tenant hassle and don't want to manage them but have definite feelings on how everything should be done - but keep them pretty much to myself because I don't want to micro-manage and am aware there are lots of ways to do things.

We did some volunteer work for a national antique oriental carpet group and have worked at a nationally ranked #1 art fair for a number of years. In both cases we were very capable and zipped up to second tier management levels, but I just didn't get an appropriate amount of joy vs. work. - If we were going to work that hard I wanted to see some cash, and we didn't need the cash, so why were we working so hard? Over and over I've taken something I enjoy and worked it and then found that working it killed the joy and reason I was interested to begin with.

Lending money to house flippers has been entertaining and has kept us peripherally in the real estate game, and maybe that is the point - we don't really need the money for our modest lifestyle, but staying relevant IS something we need, and the profit is a good measure of our relevance.
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Old 05-01-2015, 09:31 PM   #46
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In August, there was a vm on house phone from Adult Ed Director in our school district, asking me to call them about a part-time job. DH was saying, NO, NO, Do NOT call.

He was flabbergasted when I acted interested. He scared me enough, that when I went in to meet with her, I was very adamant about needing time off for four trips/yr. (exaggerating how many trips we take). Though, this year, I did take off for four trips. (YAY)


It is two days a week and they "let" me off for travel whenever I put in for the days. It is not as much fun as my former life as a school librarian, but is rewarding in its own way. It is in a lab for folks working on computer skills for a job, or a better job.


I just signed up for next year. DH was calmer this time.


Bonus: DH feels guilty on my working days and does all sorts of amazing things around the house -- all the laundry, vacuuming, mopping, etc. So far, it has worked out well. ; )


If I could not easily take off whenever I want, it would not be a good fit.
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Old 05-01-2015, 10:02 PM   #47
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Ohyes, your comment about being a school librarian reminded me of a recent conversation with a good friend who is a school administrator. He has a school librarian who is in her 42nd year and will not retire. Pension is capped at 40 years which is actually 115% of salary because retirement contributions are not deducted from pension. She is actually losing money working all school year. If she did the job for free she would make more money, yet she is not going to quit!


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Old 05-01-2015, 10:27 PM   #48
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Ohyes, your comment about being a school librarian reminded me of a recent conversation with a good friend who is a school administrator. He has a school librarian who is in her 42nd year and will not retire. Pension is capped at 40 years which is actually 115% of salary because retirement contributions are not deducted from pension. She is actually losing money working all school year. If she did the job for free she would make more money, yet she is not going to quit!


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Having a job you love is a blessing too few have enjoyed for any length of time, let alone 42 years! Good for her.

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Old 05-02-2015, 04:02 PM   #49
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Ohyes, your comment about being a school librarian reminded me of a recent conversation with a good friend who is a school administrator. He has a school librarian who is in her 42nd year and will not retire. Pension is capped at 40 years which is actually 115% of salary because retirement contributions are not deducted from pension. She is actually losing money working all school year. If she did the job for free she would make more money, yet she is not going to quit!


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That made me smile. During the last week of my employment, an administrator commented that it was so cool i was retiring while still on top of my game. But, I knew better. I had been trying to fake the job passion for a couple years.

After 42 years, i can see the school making my life so miserable, I'd have to leave. Our state newspaper did a feature story on long time teachers. Amazing - 44, 46, years.......and they all were portrayed as so excited/passionate/effective, even.
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Old 05-02-2015, 04:11 PM   #50
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She is actually losing money working all school year. If she did the job for free she would make more money, yet she is not going to quit!
Some folks are just not cut out to be ER people....

I worked with a couple of guys like that. They could have retired and had a higher income than if they'd stayed working but persisted on anyway. Made no sense to me but I supposed it made them happy.
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Old 05-02-2015, 04:47 PM   #51
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I have been working part time at the local post office for a while, but it has suddenly become a little less part-time than before. Back in January, the job I did (and had to reapply for to keep) became a union represented position. Well, with that comes required rules about promotions and conversions to "career" positions, which hit me a couple weeks ago. I had no choice; I had to take it or else just walk away from it all.

So now I am a "part time flexible" career clerk, working probably 20-25 hours a week on average, sometimes a bit more, sometimes a bit less. The pay is better and I get all the federal benefits now, but I'll work more hours and I'll have to do it at the next town over, 8 miles away, instead of three blocks away. We'll see how it goes. It's not like I'll accumulate a pension large enough to put the golden handcuffs on me, so it will still be easy to walk away if it starts to suck. I did immediately put 5% into a Roth TSP to get the full match, of course.

That said, getting the full benefits of being a fed employee for a 20-25 hour j*b isn't a bad deal. It's just a little more w*rk than I really planned for.
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Old 05-02-2015, 05:01 PM   #52
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Some folks are just not cut out to be ER people....

I worked with a couple of guys like that. They could have retired and had a higher income than if they'd stayed working but persisted on anyway. Made no sense to me but I supposed it made them happy.
Back in 2003 Megacorp made an early out offer that was accepted by so many more people than they expected that it nearly crippled the company. Sadly, I wasn't eligible (took me 3 more years to get out). But I knew a number of people that weren't going to take the offer until they talked to the financial advisors the company provided. The FAs pointed out that mathematically they'd be working for free for 2-3 years if they stayed. These people were all computer engineer types and understood numbers once they were explained. Every one of them ended up taking the offer. I'm sure a few got other jobs afterward, but I know two personally that once they got used to ER couldn't bring themselves to go back to work.

Sometimes all it takes is exposure to make an ER type.
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:48 PM   #53
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We just retired this year (mid 40s) but probably will end up doing some part time work as we love to build (both engineers) and building stuff is expensive unless you get paid to do it.
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Old 05-03-2015, 04:35 PM   #54
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We have been retired 3 years. My husband volunteered one day a week for Meals on Wheels. They liked him so much they created a job delivering meals 5 days a week every other week. He just makes about $750 and we get mileage reimbursement which pays for all of our gas on both cars. He likes the nature of the work - it's just about 3 hours a day.

It's not enough money to pay taxes on as we are living on cash saved. We haven't started withdrawing from IRAs yet.

Another guy works opposite him on the weeks my DH doesn't drive, and they exchange for vacations and time off so it's pretty easy. I am not interested in working at all.
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Old 05-03-2015, 05:57 PM   #55
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We just retired this year (mid 40s) but probably will end up doing some part time work as we love to build (both engineers) and building stuff is expensive unless you get paid to do it.
I'm building my house and I am actually saving quite a lot of money doing most of it myself and I also enjoy the construction stuff. Of course spending last winter sweeping snow off the floor of the half-finished framing may not appeal to all, but I didn't mind (except that last snow last week when it was supposed to be springtime. ) I certainly would not want a job with all the deadlines, etc. I will do volunteer work on maintenance and new construction at my favorite charity when my house is complete.
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Old 05-04-2015, 06:36 AM   #56
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I work doing taxes.
I also work as a poll worker for the elections twice a year.


Doing taxes gets me out to meet people in this rural community. The poll worker thing is community service even though I get paid for it. I wish I haven't started it.
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:56 AM   #57
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Free, I used to be a poll manager. Grew to dread elections, for sure. I started when I was 18 and lasted for about 15 years. It helps if you only volunteer for the smaller municipalities instead of the national elections. I was a machine clerk, which meant I could stay in the background, though because I was youngest always, I would volunteer to take the cartridges up to the election commission.
Thank you for your service to your community for sure!
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:54 PM   #58
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Free, I used to be a poll manager. Grew to dread elections, for sure. I started when I was 18 and lasted for about 15 years. It helps if you only volunteer for the smaller municipalities instead of the national elections. I was a machine clerk, which meant I could stay in the background, though because I was youngest always, I would volunteer to take the cartridges up to the election commission.
Thank you for your service to your community for sure!
Glad that you could relate on the election thing. Thanks for the encouragement. Now if I can just find someone dumb enough a capable replacement.
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