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Old 09-14-2016, 12:53 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Cap_Scarlet View Post
...i have seen colleagues die and after a couple of days mourning, someone is in their office and the world has moved on.
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Ask yourself if the Company is planning to erect a full size bronze statue of you to place in front of the main office to remind all who enter the building of your accomplishments over your illustrious career.
Quoted for being particularly useful for perspective.
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Old 09-14-2016, 02:17 PM   #42
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Ask yourself if the Company is planning to erect a full size bronze statue of you to place in front of the main office to remind all who enter the building of your accomplishments over your illustrious career.

I heard that it was considered by corporate, but that they chose to reserve the giant dildo statue for the current CEO...
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Old 09-14-2016, 02:52 PM   #43
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I am reconciled to the fact that the corporation does not really care about any one individual as there are always other people in line (our organization has around 230,000 people so there's ALWAYS someone).

I have only seen a very small number of people stay past 56 (I am 52) as that's the qualifying date for the early retirement package (essentially a years salary for free). My intention is to try and bargain for it. They may say no but I hope to position such that my long term loyalty can be bought i.e. I will not go and work for the competition.

Am I trying to play the game?....yes, a little bit so for the next few weeks I need to be a good boy.

So here's my therapy:

1. I will miss some of the people.
2. I will miss the interesting international projects.
3. I will miss flying business class (and occasionally getting upgraded to first)
4. I will miss developing new things
5. I will miss training people

I will not miss

1. Late nights
2. Endlessly increasing targets
3. Corporate rah rah
4. Constant change (new this, new that)
5. Ratings and assessments

I have told them that I am thinking about leavings (I'm FI so I don't really care anymore) and they asked me to "name my ideal job"...and you know what, I actually find that quite hard. But let me ask you this...what would you say if your employer asked you that?
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:51 PM   #44
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For the last couple of years....my employer asked me what my dream job was in a standard form letter. And I kept replying what I did this year....I am working my dream job. .My job changes a bit each year...just enough to make it interesting. But the only reason each year is so good........I only work 1/2 time. I go to half the meetings, I get half the work load, I get to sleep in and work in the afternoons.....and I get half the bulls___.

I get to work with the half of the people and they are mostly the ones I like.....the only downside is.....I get half the paycheck. But to me, I have just enough time to enjoy my profession and enough down time I am not exhausted at year end. For this year, it is worth it......at 65 maybe it is time to move onto another life...but for now it is one year at a time and I am lucky my employer values my contribution....
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:15 PM   #45
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As I've been contemplating retirement the last few months I've come to the conclusion that there are the following factors in play.

1. I've spent my whole life aiming for something, working at a career, is it really over?

2. I feel as if I add value at work, but....

3. I feel frustrated that we can all see the inefficiency in the organization, and...

4. i have seen colleagues die and after a couple of days mourning, someone is in their office and the world has moved on.

5. Will I be bored in retirement?

6. I think I might want a really expensive car although I know they are a total waste of money

7. What happens if 12 months down the road I realize its a mistake, but..

8. I want the freedom to just be.....lazy

The prioritization of the above tends to change on a daily basis, so please either:

A. Tell me you felt the same things (and how you got over them).
B. Add your own insecurities
1. Career could be over, but that's ok. Time to move on to something else.
2. Did add some value at work, Time to add value on a personal level.
3. Have no control over inefficiency at work - leave the frustration behind.
4. Work colleagues die - more of a signal to retire to enjoy life.
5. Bored in retirement? Really? Not if you have personal interests that are more fun than work.
6. If you want an expensive car and can afford it - buy it!
7. If you realize you made a mistake 12 months down the road, you could go back to work.
8. Retirement is made for being lazy.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:58 PM   #46
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After retirement I value my personal freedom more than ever.

Nothing money can buy is worth more than my independence.

.
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.

I no longer think "I can always go back to work." I now think "I can always sell my house and move to a LCOL area." The money has become progressively less important to me and my freedom has become more important. Freedom to do something or nothing as I see fit. Then again I have realized that I can be quite happy doing nothing!
+1

Oh Yes, Oh Yes!!
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Old 09-14-2016, 11:18 PM   #47
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+1. I may be in the minority (along with Braumeister), but I really had no trepidation about retirement at all. I had anticipated it, and planned for it, for so long, that when the time finally arrived, there was no hesitation, and I have not looked back at all. I had a good career, and mostly enjoyed my job (until near the end), but after 31 years, I was more than ready to move on to another chapter. I think it is really important to seperate your career from your identity - I see lots of folks that have problems doing that.
+1

You're not alone! In my early 30's, I had loosely started planning and saving for ER sometime in my to mid 50's. I just knew deep down that I wasn't a "company man." Although I enjoyed the technical work, the politics grew more painful with time. Most importantly, I saw that folks put too much faith in the company and the work world in general to secure their own futures. I wasn't going to be one of those guys kicked out into the cold in my 50's without anywhere to go...

Well, I saved and had some good luck, then found myself FIRED much earlier than expected at 45. Both DW and I are ready to move own. Almost 2 years into FIRE, our new life is coming into focus. Even though most of us are used to delayed gratification, I've found that learning to ENJOY the good stuff takes time too.

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Old 09-15-2016, 02:15 AM   #48
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Been retired 3 years and had several of the concerns you had. It seems so silly now. Intellectually I had planned for what my retirement might be. The reality of it surpassed my expectations. Hardly a day goes by where I, in awe of it all, say to either myself or my wife, I love our life. I never felt that intensity about work. If I had, they wouldn't have had to pay me.

I'll tell you this too;
I seriously doubt the people you work with and call friends will even try to contact you after you retire. I made attempts to get together with some of my co-workers who I considered friends. The relationship had been built on mutual need and a limited exposure to who you can choose as a friend.
After I retired, I made what I call real friends. People who don't expect anything from me other than my company. People who don't care if I'm lazy, late, etc. Friendships based only on personality compatibility. People who want to spend time with you, not people who have to be paid to spend time with you.
Also, I don't remember hardly anyone's name after 3+ years of retirement. No more than I remember the names of the men I served in the military with. A few names, but mostly no, I recall their faces but putting a name to 'em has faded.

I guess I spend too much time with grand kids and my social circle and the co-workers from years ago just don't matter enough to even remember their names any more.
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Old 09-15-2016, 04:08 AM   #49
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I guess the two most important questions are #5, and #7 (assuming you can afford to retire at this time).
"Bored" will most likely take care of itself (see your #8). #7 can be "fixed" by taking another job...part time?....expand a hobby?....pursue a "dream job".

When you don't really need the money (of a former occupation) you are free to find a "job" that you enjoy, with earning money as a secondary concern. Perhaps after a period of "decompression" (12 months?) you will want to work at something less time restrictive or stressful. Or maybe volunteer.

Pull the trigger!! (Keep #4 in mind.)
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Old 09-16-2016, 01:10 PM   #50
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I have told them that I am thinking about leavings (I'm FI so I don't really care anymore) and they asked me to "name my ideal job"...and you know what, I actually find that quite hard. But let me ask you this...what would you say if your employer asked you that?
That depends on what you want to happen. Do you want a 6 month sabbatical so you can think on it some more? Part time work from home? Another job in the company? They are obviously reluctant to let you go, which is a nice position to be in.

My company is not the same- there is nowhere else for them to move me (that I would consider going). I have lessened my hours which has improved my attitude dramatically. I'd have quit already if I hadn't been able to do that. But I'm still leaving on my target date. I plan on offering them some time to replace me, but if they don't I'm ok with that too
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Old 09-16-2016, 01:36 PM   #51
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I don't recall a time when I ever dreamed of having one single career at one single company. This is patently obvious if you see my full resume. But I did enjoy my IT work, getting paid for something I end up doing for free every time I step foot in someone's home. However, I've always been drawn to the freelance/self-employed side of things. This manifested itself early on as a very independent streak, at least when it came to taking orders from someone else, like a teacher, or a parent...later from bosses. I'm not big on 'teams' I guess.

So I was on-board 100% from the very first time I ran across the idea of retiring early. After four years of pseudo-retirement, I miss it every day. Can not WAIT to be fully, really retired at 56 next year. Will go back to Mexico and not ever -- NEVER -- miss working in an office again. My income and work has always been secondary to the rest of my life goals. A means to an end. And here's to happy endings!
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:56 PM   #52
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That depends on what you want to happen. Do you want a 6 month sabbatical so you can think on it some more? Part time work from home? Another job in the company? They are obviously reluctant to let you go, which is a nice position to be in.
Actually I don't really know - already had a mini sabbatical (two months) which was very nice. My dream job is probably roving the world saying clever stuff and eating nice dinners :-P but more likely is part time and work from home which is available. They are reluctant to let me go to a point so my favoured outcome is probably to negotiate an early retirement package with a consulting package of say 3-400 hours per annum.
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Old 09-17-2016, 08:07 AM   #53
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No two different retirements than my father and I. I retired at 45 (7 years ago) while he was still working at 70. But he was literally working for free at my brothers barber shop. He literally worked 2 jobs for mostly 30-40 years and working was his identity. His body finally broke down to where he couldnt work any more (and no he didn't need money) and for first couple years, all I heard was him saying he is "ready for Heaven", all because he couldnt work anymore. Well finally within the past 2-3 years he admitted being lazy was kind of nice and was enjoying it. He just never gave it a chance because "you are supposed to work".
As for me... My biggest shock is how incredibly mentally lazy and routine orientated I am...And like it that way! The brain will turn on for investing research and sports gambling, but that is it. It refuses to do anything else but help facilitate my tongue and vocal chords yapping.
I even refuse to try to learn to improve my golf game which I play 3-4 days a week. My cerebral 87 year old playing partner is always analyzing his swing and game and trying to provide pointers for me. I refuse to listen, because I don't want to think anymore. I just want to smash the hell out of ball and go find it and hit it hard again!
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Old 09-22-2016, 05:14 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by Cap_Scarlet View Post
As I've been contemplating retirement the last few months I've come to the conclusion that there are the following factors in play.

1. I've spent my whole life aiming for something, working at a career, is it really over?

2. I feel as if I add value at work, but....

3. I feel frustrated that we can all see the inefficiency in the organization, and...

4. i have seen colleagues die and after a couple of days mourning, someone is in their office and the world has moved on.

5. Will I be bored in retirement?

6. I think I might want a really expensive car although I know they are a total waste of money

7. What happens if 12 months down the road I realize its a mistake, but..

8. I want the freedom to just be.....lazy

The prioritization of the above tends to change on a daily basis, so please either:

A. Tell me you felt the same things (and how you got over them).
B. Add your own insecurities
I never let my career define me...so when it was time to leave...I had no issues about it. (I was a finance exec...but my screen name is not because of that...it's because personal finance is a hobby of mine)

Inefficiency in the operation will always be there. I see that as opportunity to fix things...that is how one adds value!

When colleagues die, things must move on. Yes there is a period of grief, but if I was not close to them then it wanes. When a loved one dies, the process is different for me...the mourning lasts longer and the depth depends on the circumstances (tougher to stomach a young person dying unexpectedly versus my dad dying in his sleep at age 82 after living a good life).

I am definitely not bored. I have tons of hobbies. If you don't have any, get a few. Making stained glass, playing guitar or piano, reading books about former Presidents, coin collecting, photography, herb gardening...the list is endless!!

I have 3 expensive cars. They are a financial waste of money, but I am a car enthusiast so 2 of them are "hobby" related...I go to lots of car shows and have many friends who go to cruise-ins and other such events. If you really want one but are worried about spending the money...buy one that's 3-4 years old!




If you realize later it was a mistake, you didn't think through it well enough...take some time and reflect. Read some books on it, do the life tree exercise. Talk to friends, your pastor, your kids, your parents, and those on this forum. If you're not sure...wait a few months longer.

Life Tree Exercise
https://livingafi.com/2015/03/09/bui...-without-work/

I hereby grant you the freedom to be lazy. LOL

My insecurities now are more about legacy. I want to give more (both financially and my time), I want to deepen my faith, and I want to be a better husband. Having time to reflect has allowed me to think about these things.
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Old 09-22-2016, 05:54 AM   #55
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"You're too young to retire!"

Post #37 May 15-2011

5+ years later......if anything's changed, it's for the better.
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Old 09-22-2016, 06:18 AM   #56
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Dream job - as I was being booted out of a job I really loved, I made a play for my previously unstated dream job, and they gave it to me! That gave me a fantastic 18-month runway to FIRE. I knew that I was on the outs, as they had already tried to boot me, so I had no illusions, and I used the time to plan, save and get mentally prepared. The runway was well worth it. So my advice: say what you want. If you get it, put a hard timer on it and use it as a gift. If you don't get it, just pull the plug!


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Old 09-22-2016, 06:38 AM   #57
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Didn't read all the posts but this being an Early Retirement site, you can expect the vast majority here love retirement or think they will. Obviously the items the OP mentioned are valid concerns. At some point in their careers, most people have had enough. Only you will know when this occurs. Once it does, the concerns listed will start to recede and eventually disappear. A period of adjustment is usual but some people are so ready for retirement that they didn't notice it.
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Old 09-22-2016, 07:24 AM   #58
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Didn't read all the posts but this being an Early Retirement site, you can expect the vast majority here love retirement or think they will. Obviously the items the OP mentioned are valid concerns. At some point in their careers, most people have had enough. Only you will know when this occurs. Once it does, the concerns listed will start to recede and eventually disappear. A period of adjustment is usual but some people are so ready for retirement that they didn't notice it.
Danmar, I nominate this for the best post I've read in a long time. You concisely express in a couple of sentences everything relevant to the transition to ER.
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Old 09-23-2016, 03:12 PM   #59
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I should probably add that the work pressures were manageable in the past because:

a. I am earning a shed load of money.
b. My wife was looking after the kids and therefore wasn't worried that I was away from home.

Now of course that the kids have grown up and (recently) left home, she has a lot more time on her hands and therefore wants me at home (a perfectly reasonable set of circumstances). I think I hate the job 75% of the time but love the money 100% of the time.

That combination at the moment is a bit of a tinderbox.

It sounds like nonsense but in so many ways I am like the guy standing on the edge of a swimming pool dipping a toe in and worrying that it might be a bit cold when a run up and jump would make it so much easier to get in!
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Old 09-23-2016, 05:48 PM   #60
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I think I hate the job 75% of the time but love the money 100% of the time.
Almost by definition one has a lower income as soon as he/she retires, no doubt the main reason for OMY. I have a few friends like that who simply do not want to lose the high salary......even though they hate w*rking. As for me, I'm happy as a pig in you-know-what. Think about what makes you happy; if your assets and retirement income can support that, then don't factor in the current salary.
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