Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
"You'll Be Bored!!!"
Old 08-05-2014, 12:13 PM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
"You'll Be Bored!!!"

OK...let me first say that this is more of a rant than a looking for advice thread...

Quick summation...I am 40 year dude that has 63 working days before I retire FOR GOOD. I think I did some good planning, LBYM, and all that goodness. You can find specifics on my financial standing in the "introduce yourself" thread, so I won't rehash this here.

Here's my problem. I have a family member that just can't it through his thick skull that I *can* and that I *will* retire in a few months and will be perfectly happy NOT HAVING A J*B EVER AGAIN!!! Of course, this isn't a 100% guarantee, but since I clocked in for my very first job at Little Caesar's Pizza years ago, I figured out that working straight SUCKS and I didn't want to do it for 30+ years. He is absolutely convinced that I will be bored out of my mind and will have to go find a j*b to occupy myself. Never mind the fact that I already have a nice long list of stuff I would like to do in retirement that will keep me very occupied for a significant amount of time. I wonder if his lack of money skills which resulted him retiring late in life (almost 70 years old in spite of a Lt Col pension!) is being shifted to me as jealousy. I also think he feels since I am a enlisted guy...there is NO way, I could be FIRE. Truth be told, I don't like this family member anyway, so it's very much inconsequential...but he's not the only one to have said it...and quite frankly it's annoying as hell.

I initially thought that most folks I know would be happy that I am able to RE, but I am getting much the opposite...and I do know much of it is jealousy. I have been very hesitant up until this point to have an "alternative story", but I think calling myself a consultant and running with that story sure would make things easier and the hating will stop!

Whew...sorry about that. Like I said, I am not really looking for advice per se, but I really needed to get this off my chest. Needless to say, there aren't too many people in my shoes that I can vent to...but there are lots on this forum!!!
__________________

__________________
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-05-2014, 12:33 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
robnplunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 2,124
Rant away! You will be bore ... NOT! Congrats!
__________________

__________________
Pura Vida
robnplunder is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:33 PM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 61
Virtually no one I know has been happy that we're ER. Some of it has been covert jealousy and some of it has been very obvious like your family member.

As for his motivation, you have already pegged it: "...his lack of money skills which resulted him retiring late in life (almost 70 years old in spite of a Lt Col pension!) is being shifted to me as jealousy."

Congratulations on counting down just 63 more days. Well done. Don't sweat a cover story; once October rolls around, just wallow in your "nice long list of stuff" you are looking forward to enjoying. And remember: living well really is the best revenge.
__________________
footenote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:34 PM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,971
Just tell people you're retired from the military with a military pension. That should be enough to explain how you're able to retire at your age. It shouldn't be a shock for a 40 year old to retire if they have a cola'd military/gov't pension. What shocks me is when people retire in their 40's with a cola'd pension and then start a new career. Why would you work when you don't need to?
__________________
aaronc879 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:42 PM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 6,328
Bored? I wish I had time to be bored!
__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:44 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronc879 View Post
Just tell people you're retired from the military with a military pension. That should be enough to explain how you're able to retire at your age. It shouldn't be a shock for a 40 year old to retire if they have a cola'd military/gov't pension. What shocks me is when people retire in their 40's with a cola'd pension and then start a new career. Why would you work when you don't need to?
I think this is because there is very little education in the military (at least in the Air Force) about finances and money management. The fact is that many folks that enlist in the military do so because they don't have a means to go to college (this is NOT a generalization, just from experience) and don't have the background/education to see how the pension can indeed be a pathway to COMPLETE retirement. From day one of freedom from basic training, guys and gals are given a generous credit line to go buy "yesterday's technology at tomorrow's prices" at the BX/PX. It starts early and keeps on throughout the career. New strip? NEW CAR! Went TDY and made some money? Time for a 108" HDTV!!! It's a vicious circle that is hard to stop. I have endured years of abuse about my frugal ways...but guess what?!? Sure is good for me now! I have a good friend that is a LTC and is looking to retire in about a year...and he is FREAKING out about finding a job because he lives like he's a 3 star general. It's really quite sad.

I have heard that they are making the new guys (in the AF anyway) go through a basic finance class once they get to their first duty station. I am not sure what this involves though...I have to assume that with some of the sweet rides the youngins are cruising around in, it's nothing more than "Pay your bills to stay out of trouble!".

Thanks for letting me rant...it's a frustrating thing but I should have expected it. I have seen LOTS of examples here of it happening to the younger set.
__________________
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:47 PM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Still slaving away part-time, but many people ask "Won't you be bored?" when I tell them I'm hanging it up for good in next year or two.

My answer: "I've been bored before, but I've never considered w*rk to be the antidote."

Plus, I'm pretty good at entertaining myself.
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:49 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,038
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyBoy5 View Post

Thanks for letting me rant...it's a frustrating thing but I should have expected it. I have seen LOTS of examples here of it happening to the younger set.
Exactly. It comes with the territory.
__________________
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 12:50 PM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
Bored? I wish I had time to be bored!
Chuckanut...I love your sig line (A man of small but independent means). I saw a reference to it in another thread as well...best retirement line EVER!!!
__________________
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:02 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
Still slaving away part-time, but many people ask "Won't you be bored?" when I tell them I'm hanging it up for good in next year or two.

My answer: "I've been bored before, but I've never considered w*rk to be the antidote."

Plus, I'm pretty good at entertaining myself.
That's pretty good...I'll have to use that one!
__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:06 PM   #11
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
My answer: "I've been bored before, but I've never considered w*rk to be the antidote."
I'm going to have to remember this, thank you! I'd usually respond with something like "Well I'm bored with w*rking anyway, so what's the difference?", but your way is a lot more catchy!
__________________
Andre1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:10 PM   #12
Full time employment: Posting here.
friar1610's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronc879 View Post
Just tell people you're retired from the military with a military pension. That should be enough to explain how you're able to retire at your age. It shouldn't be a shock for a 40 year old to retire if they have a cola'd military/gov't pension. What shocks me is when people retire in their 40's with a cola'd pension and then start a new career. Why would you work when you don't need to?
Might not be quite that simple. For a single person, a cola'd military pension might be just fine. For a family, particularly if the military member retires as, say, an E-6 or E-7, I think it would be very, very difficult to get by on just the pension.
__________________
friar1610
friar1610 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:31 PM   #13
Recycles dryer sheets
DFA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by friar1610 View Post
Might not be quite that simple. For a single person, a cola'd military pension might be just fine. For a family, particularly if the military member retires as, say, an E-6 or E-7, I think it would be very, very difficult to get by on just the pension.

This is true, I retired USAF in 1996, as an E-6 with 15K Cola'd pension including VA disability (had some issues early on) and still had to work an additional 18 years in IT to retire, DW is still working on 32 years military and 24 years Civil Service, but will be hanging it up in 14 months. I sometime feel that some think that all military people have 40K to 100K pensions, most don't have more than 20K. I know it is better than nothing, but most of the time you can't live on it.

As for the OP's rant, I list myself as an Executive Consultant and no one asks if I am bored, just have to avoid the head hunters looking for IT Consultants, I get emails almost daily, when the call or email me I ask what the job is paying and than tell them that is not enough and to have a great day.
__________________
DFA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:39 PM   #14
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 620
We are different. A certain personality type is drawn to ER. The majority of the population is not like that, and probably would feel lost and bored without a lot of structure in their lives, and a j*b provides that structure.
__________________
Which Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:51 PM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,570
Quote:
I sometime feel that some think that all military people have 40K to 100K pensions, most don't have more than 20K. I know it is better than nothing, but most of the time you can't live on it.

Thank You. I'm glad somebody said it. I usually hold my tongue on these matters lest I sound like "sour grapes" on one end or advocating for getting "grabby"/or playing the poor-me violin on the other.
__________________
razztazz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 01:59 PM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by friar1610 View Post
Might not be quite that simple. For a single person, a cola'd military pension might be just fine. For a family, particularly if the military member retires as, say, an E-6 or E-7, I think it would be very, very difficult to get by on just the pension.
Presumably they would've saved 10%+ of their income for at least 15 years prior to retirement. A single person or someone with a working spouse shouldn't have to work anymore once they start their pension. If they are married with dependent children and their spouse doesn't work then I could see them needing additional income. An E-6 retiring today with barely 20 years would have their pension start at just over $22K/yr. Any officer who puts in 20 years should be able to retire on their pension kids or no kids.
__________________
aaronc879 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 02:08 PM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronc879 View Post
Presumably they would've saved 10%+ of their income for at least 15 years prior to retirement. A single person or someone with a working spouse shouldn't have to work anymore once they start their pension. If they are married with dependent children and their spouse doesn't work then I could see them needing additional income. An E-6 retiring today with barely 20 years would have their pension start at just over $22K/yr. Any officer who puts in 20 years should be able to retire on their pension kids or no kids.
Don't get me wrong...my situation is out of the ordinary. For *most* people, retiring as a enlisted guy on the pension only would be almost impossible. However, given the right circumstances (and training as I eluded to earlier) it can be done. Of course, once you add in kiddos, college for the kids, a wife who may not work..well, these are all variables that are, well, just that..variables. If I had not saved like a mad man, I would be VERY hesitant to retire as an enlisted guy. But between the generous pension, some good dividend stocks, no debt, LBYM and a wife that plays along...I will be getting along fabulously. Well...until Congress decides that us "working age" retirees have it too good and we get screwed on benefits...but that's a WHOLE 'NOTHER TOPIC!
__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 02:15 PM   #18
Recycles dryer sheets
DFA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronc879 View Post
Presumably they would've saved 10%+ of their income for at least 15 years prior to retirement. A single person or someone with a working spouse shouldn't have to work anymore once they start their pension. If they are married with dependent children and their spouse doesn't work then I could see them needing additional income. An E-6 retiring today with barely 20 years would have their pension start at just over $22K/yr. Any officer who puts in 20 years should be able to retire on their pension kids or no kids.
Very true, I did not save enough when I was in, and there was no TSP or 401k at the time for forced savings. Also you need to consider that a 22k pension would be reduced by taxes, medical insurance since VA mostly covers service connected issue and needs to bill your insurance for anything else. I know my insurance gets billed a lot from the VA and the VA does not take TRICARE insurance.

Sorry for being off topic.
__________________
DFA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 03:07 PM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyBoy5 View Post
I have a family member that just can't it through his thick skull that I *can* and that I *will* retire in a few months and will be perfectly happy NOT HAVING A J*B EVER AGAIN!!!
In my case, that family member is my father. I told him I was planning to retire in the next 5 years (around age 57) and he just doesn't understand it. He has accepted that I'm serious, but every conversation we've had about it has him suggesting new careers I can start to make money.

In this case, I think his concern is twofold. 1) He sold his business and retired about 7 years ago (at age 70) and probably still regrets it. He's used to running things and running the condo association just doesn't cut it. He loves being around people, and misses all that social stimulation. 2) We don't talk about money in specifics, so he probably truly is worried that I won't have enough money. While I do live in a big house and like rather expensive travel (things he can easily see), I live very frugally in just about every other area of life. (He keeps wanting me to talk to "his guy" for investing -- I keep demurring!)

So it seems that he truly is concerned for me, but through his lens, not mine. I'll get him to come around And in the meantime, he does have some great advice for the areas of retirement that I would like his opinion on!
__________________
ChicagoGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2014, 03:12 PM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 6,328
Before I retired I already had people trying to talk me out of it with the 'You will be bored' line of thinking. Some were also planning for me to go back to work part time - teaching at a community college, substitute teaching, working as a barrista. Others wanted me to commit to various volunteer activities that would have constrained my free time almost as much as work does. All this 'advice' despite the fact that I had not yet enjoyed even one day of retirement.

Why these people think they need to run my life is beyond me.
__________________

__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Won't you be bored? 67walkon Life after FIRE 47 10-30-2012 10:18 AM
Are you bored today? An antidote... freebird5825 Other topics 1 05-07-2009 09:19 AM
And you thought YOU were bored? thefed Other topics 6 03-09-2008 02:07 PM
Bored at work Sillysal Other topics 18 07-20-2005 08:26 PM
Bored bored bored bored bored... malakito Young Dreamers 35 02-07-2005 05:19 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:06 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.