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Old 11-21-2017, 05:19 PM   #2101
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My latest repair wasn;t necessarily a repair, but was replacing our screen door with a storm door.... DW wanted to be able to have the entry door open and natural light in the entry hallway when we had the AC going.

Initial instalation was easy but just a bit too tight... the door rubbed slightly against the jamb when it closed. So I took it apart, got out my trusty trim saw and trimmed 1/8" off the jamb and then reinstalled. It now works like a charm and DW is (temporarily) happy.
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Old 11-21-2017, 05:44 PM   #2102
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I think I finally have repaired the low beams on the Malibu. I have had the front fascia off perhaps 4 times now trying to get to the bottom of it.

Turns out that over time, the electrical connector that attaches to the bulbs has started to melt. When I replaced the bulbs, they worked, for a few months. Then the electrical connector became intermittent. I did some reading and some guy on the internet posted that there were connector issues. So I replaced the connectors. That worked, for an hour or so. Apparently there was enough gook on the light bulb terminals that they were fouled. So I replaced the bulbs again, and now things seem to work.


I am getting really good a tearing off the front of the car!
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Old 11-21-2017, 09:17 PM   #2103
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See my post in "What did you do today....." for details

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Old 11-26-2017, 08:03 AM   #2104
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See my post in "What did you do today....." for details

Good Job! That sure looks familiar. I did the same thing to our washer several years ago. It wasn't particularly difficult but there were lots of parts to keep track of during the process.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:33 PM   #2105
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.......... there were lots of parts to keep track of during the process.
Where do you keep the left over parts?
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Old 11-27-2017, 06:15 PM   #2106
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Where do you keep the left over parts?
I also did similar. Spare parts go in the lint catcher.
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Old 11-29-2017, 11:03 AM   #2107
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Replaced our old toilet with a low-flow Kohler Cimarron.

I didn't realize until I started the project that the toilet flange was not previously attached to the floor. So a few trips to the home store to obtain concrete lag screws, grout, grout sealer and a few other odd & ends and all is well.

Our house was built in 1950 and we really like the pink tile. Glad I didn't have to do much grout repair. It's in okay shape for now.

The really low flow (1.28 GPF) is unsettling. Yes, the toilet flushes but is 1.28 gallons sufficient to move everything through the system? Time will tell.

IMG_1511978468.201735.jpg

IMG_1511978500.059885.jpg

IMG_1511978522.180065.jpg
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Old 11-29-2017, 01:22 PM   #2108
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Originally Posted by Clone View Post
I think I finally have repaired the low beams on the Malibu. I have had the front fascia off perhaps 4 times now trying to get to the bottom of it.

Turns out that over time, the electrical connector that attaches to the bulbs has started to melt. When I replaced the bulbs, they worked, for a few months. Then the electrical connector became intermittent. I did some reading and some guy on the internet posted that there were connector issues. So I replaced the connectors. That worked, for an hour or so. Apparently there was enough gook on the light bulb terminals that they were fouled. So I replaced the bulbs again, and now things seem to work.


I am getting really good a tearing off the front of the car!
I think the designers of your wheels should be sentenced to one year of repairing those cars. In a grimey shop no less.
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Old 11-29-2017, 01:29 PM   #2109
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I think the designers of your wheels should be sentenced to one year of repairing those cars. In a grimey shop no less.
I once read a cute sci-fi novel, where aliens had landed. They were unusual as each arm had 2 elbow joints. They were captured and put to work in car repair shops
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Old 01-13-2018, 09:38 AM   #2110
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Originally Posted by nvestysly View Post
Replaced our old toilet with a low-flow Kohler Cimarron.

I didn't realize until I started the project that the toilet flange was not previously attached to the floor. So a few trips to the home store to obtain concrete lag screws, grout, grout sealer and a few other odd & ends and all is well.

Our house was built in 1950 and we really like the pink tile. Glad I didn't have to do much grout repair. It's in okay shape for now.

The really low flow (1.28 GPF) is unsettling. Yes, the toilet flushes but is 1.28 gallons sufficient to move everything through the system? Time will tell.

Attachment 27272

Attachment 27273

Attachment 27274


Nice work on that install. As long as your pitch is correct on your waste line you should be fine. If you weren't having blockage problems before you shouldn't have a problem now.
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Old 03-01-2018, 02:48 PM   #2111
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The latch mechanism on one of our exterior door locks stopped retracting as the door was closed unless we turned the handle while closing. It was a little bit of a pain leaving the door unlocked while we exited and then locking with a key. Did a little google searching and found that the manufacturer, Schlage, provides a lifetime warranty on the lock. I called their customer service and they understood exactly what was needed, took my contact information and immediately shipped me the replacement part. It arrived today. It just took a few minutes to take apart the handle, replace the latch mechanism, and put it back together. Works great. Was surprised by how easy it was to get the part under warranty and install. Wish every handyman job around our 90 year old house was so easy!
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Old 03-01-2018, 03:11 PM   #2112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clone View Post
I think I finally have repaired the low beams on the Malibu. I have had the front fascia off perhaps 4 times now trying to get to the bottom of it.

Turns out that over time, the electrical connector that attaches to the bulbs has started to melt. When I replaced the bulbs, they worked, for a few months. Then the electrical connector became intermittent. I did some reading and some guy on the internet posted that there were connector issues. So I replaced the connectors. That worked, for an hour or so. Apparently there was enough gook on the light bulb terminals that they were fouled. So I replaced the bulbs again, and now things seem to work.


I am getting really good a tearing off the front of the car!
Electrical connectors, you say? My latest repair is to find out why my 88 Trans Am GTA is bogging on acceleration *sometimes*. Internet says it can be one or more of 8 million different things, of course. Oh well, good to have the time to check it out, as a retiree. If I had a mechanic friend, I'd gladly buy him 3 cases of his favorite beer just to to diagnose it. But noooooo........
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Old 03-01-2018, 03:15 PM   #2113
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Where do you keep the left over parts?
That reminds me:

Many decades ago when I was working as a heating/refrigeration service tech at Sears, many of the parts such as refrigerator condenser fans came in kits that fit many different models of refrigerator so it was normal to have parts like mounting brackets and such left over that would be used on a different model.

Lots of customers didn't buy that and would call a supervisor to complain about the "incompetent" service tech who had left after boxing up the leftover parts.

That story reminds me again why I'm so glad to be retired and don't have to deal with a$$hats anymore.
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Old 03-02-2018, 02:14 AM   #2114
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The really low flow (1.28 GPF) is unsettling. Yes, the toilet flushes but is 1.28 gallons sufficient to move everything through the system? Time will tell.
I share your skepticism. If I lived in a 10th floor condo I wouldn't worry, but I live on a typical suburban lot. Like most people, I have no idea what tne (minimum) slope of my sewer line is. Plus, I've got clay tile sewer line, so I'm sure it's not as smooth as PVC, and the momentum of the water from the flush helps move "things" down the line. I'm replacing a 1.6 GPF toilet in another house, and I'm getting another 1.6GPF toilet while they can still be purchased. I'm sure the EPA is very proud of their 1.28 GPF "WaterSense" standard. If I buy one and my sewer line clogs up, I'm sure the EPA will send a guy out immediately with an auger to put things right. Sure they will . . ..
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Our house was built in 1950 and we really like the pink tile. Glad I didn't have to do much grout repair. It's in okay shape for now.
Looks great. Our was built in '59, also had colored tile (and fixtures). The tile in one shower started coming down and I had to replace it a few years ago, I wasn't able to save the tile. The other shower is starting to do the same thing now--I don't know if I'll be keeping the brown tile or just do something neutral as is the fashion.
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Old 03-02-2018, 07:07 AM   #2115
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Quote:
Quote: Originally Posted by nvestysly
The really low flow (1.28 GPF) is unsettling. Yes, the toilet flushes but is 1.28 gallons sufficient to move everything through the system? Time will tell.
I share your skepticism. If I lived in a 10th floor condo I wouldn't worry, but I live on a typical suburban lot. Like most people, I have no idea what tne (minimum) slope of my sewer line is. Plus, I've got clay tile sewer line, so I'm sure it's not as smooth as PVC, and the momentum of the water from the flush helps move "things" down the line. I'm replacing a 1.6 GPF toilet in another house, and I'm getting another 1.6GPF toilet while they can still be purchased. I'm sure the EPA is very proud of their 1.28 GPF "WaterSense" standard. If I buy one and my sewer line clogs up, I'm sure the EPA will send a guy out immediately with an auger to put things right. Sure they will . . .. .
When I saw that comment, I asked someone I know in the business (and then forgot which thread this came up in). They said they have not noticed any difference in rodding frequency over the years as low flush replaced the older toilets, or between homes with the old toilets and low flow. I can't say how detailed his analysis was, but he is a pretty analytic type guy, so I'd give it some weight.

He did mention homes on municipal sewers will typically have more issues in general, because the line to the street is typically longer than the line to a septic (not always of course).

But if you are really worried, maybe once a week just dump a 5 gallon bucket of water as fast as the toilet will take it.

Now that I think about it, when they pump our tank, they ask us to flush all the toilets at once as they check the flow (or at least they used to, now I think they just run the camera to check?). Anyhow, all three old toilets really don't create much flow by the time they get through the pipes. It's not like 3 waves of water coming through in close sync, it just dribbles out over about a minute. I guess gravity spreads that starting "plug" of water out over the length of the pipe. It doesn't travel in one wave, it just spreads out.

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Old 03-02-2018, 07:18 AM   #2116
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But if you are really worried, maybe once a week just dump a 5 gallon bucket of water as fast as the toilet will take it.
We run a dehumidifier in the hot weather, and while I usually use the collected water to water the potted plants on the deck, if it stops running at night I tend to dump it in the toilet, just for that reason. We're getting some work done in our bathroom next month, and I've already got a good 1.6 gallon toilet waiting in the garage. Personally I think the reason the lower rate toilets don't clog more often is that people tend to flush multiple times if needed.
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Grill Rebuild
Old 03-19-2018, 07:37 AM   #2117
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Grill Rebuild

Probably most folks would have thrown it out: a 11 year old grill and the "fire box" (main thing of the grill) was rusted-through all over...completely disintegrated. I had the burners and burner 'tents' balancing on makeshift supports for a long time, and recently the burners finally started rusting and the flames were going nuts. The outside of the grill was nice (stainless), but DW started making noises about a new grill. So I went on the Char-Broil site and scouted the parts: firebox $50, burners $10 x 4, $20 shipping. I had made my own thick stainless burner 'tents'...those will last forever, so didn't need to buy their cheap steel with black paint versions of the tents that last about 6 months.

No pictures this time, but it was a messy job, as one might imagine. The entire grill had to come apart, as everything is attached to the firebox. I had to buy a few other parts that had disintegrated, so the total went to $112, but then there was free shipping! It took a couple of hours, but I was not in a hurry.

Not as pretty as a new grill, but saved me $500 or more.
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The agitation index at our house has been raised
Old 03-19-2018, 06:24 PM   #2118
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The agitation index at our house has been raised

Not that anyone here would suffer through this youtube video I made, but I just replaced some parts in my washing machine's two-piece agitator.

Like the grill, DW was making noises about getting a fancy-shmancy washer and dryer when she realized the agitator wasn't working.

I got out for $4.14
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:31 PM   #2119
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The latch mechanism on one of our exterior door locks stopped retracting as the door was closed unless we turned the handle while closing. It was a little bit of a pain leaving the door unlocked while we exited and then locking with a key. Did a little google searching and found that the manufacturer, Schlage, provides a lifetime warranty on the lock. I called their customer service and they understood exactly what was needed, took my contact information and immediately shipped me the replacement part. It arrived today. It just took a few minutes to take apart the handle, replace the latch mechanism, and put it back together. Works great. Was surprised by how easy it was to get the part under warranty and install. Wish every handyman job around our 90 year old house was so easy!
I can sympathize. All the interior door handles in our new house were pot metal crap, and I ended up replacing all of them. I just recently replaced both exterior door locksets. Fortunately, it was relatively easy.
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Old 03-19-2018, 08:20 PM   #2120
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Busy week so far.

- Replaced my heating Lennox AC/heating system controller circuit card. The relays burned out and the blower would not turn on. It took about one hour to replace. The cost of the controller was about $200 including taxes and expedited shipping. The new card is built a lot better. (moderate task)

- My wife complained that there was a jerking motion while driving on the freeway last week on her Nissan 350Z and her instrument panel lit up. She drove home and I saw the SES light on. I hooked up my OBD II bluetooth adapter and it reported a P0345 camshaft sensor A fault. A set of 3 sensors cost $18.99 on Ebay with free shipping. I replaced the one that failed and cleared the SES light and all is well. (moderate task)

- Installed a new LED bathroom vanity light (easy task)

- Installed new emergency lighting throughout the home that will activate in the event of a power failure (easy task)
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