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Old 06-02-2015, 07:12 PM   #841
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I have a large garage that I built 30 years ago and the shingle roof needed to be replaced.
It is 1400 sq ft of roof area included ripping off the old roof
and hauling to the landfill, installing new tar paper and shingles. It took 3 weeks to
complete and cost $1300 for supplies and bandaids.
I also opted out on rooftop delivery of shingles because they wanted $7 per bundle extra.
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Old 06-02-2015, 09:04 PM   #842
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I'm not doing the repair myself but I hit a metal post pulling into a parking space and my car is in the shop. My car was in the same shop two months ago when someone hit me! Im doing very well car wise this year.
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Old 06-02-2015, 09:24 PM   #843
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I'm not doing the repair myself but I hit a metal post pulling into a parking space and my car is in the shop. My car was in the same shop two months ago when someone hit me! Im doing very well car wise this year.
So far you are batting 1.000 (2 for 2).
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Old 06-03-2015, 04:57 PM   #844
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Came home to water on the kitchen floor in front of the fridge.

A quick search revealed it is a common problem with bottom freezer Whirlpool/Maytags.

The good news it is an easy fix: just open the back panel, pop off the drain grommet, clean it, melt the ice dam, and reinstall.

The bad news is that this evaporator drain clogs easily. There are thousands of hits on it. Problem is stuff like fuzz easily gets sucked into the freezer during normal opening and closing. Some of it will work its way back to the evaporator. This gets in the drain. The drain grommet is there to stop warm air backflow, but in turn catches every possible piece of debris. When the drain stops, it freezes up and eventually flows into the compartment and onto your floor.
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:41 PM   #845
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Speaking of evaporator coil drains, it appears my main drain pan in my A/C coil in the attic is rusted thru and the condensation is leaking into my secondary pan. Just what I need....a 15 year old unit go south and the system is R22.

I know that replacing the inner pan is a pain as it is part of the coil housing.
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:46 PM   #846
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Speaking of evaporator coil drains...
Thanks for the reminder. Time for me to climb into the attic and pour a little bleach into the line to keep it clear.
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:52 PM   #847
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Thanks for the reminder. Time for me to climb into the attic and pour a little bleach into the line to keep it clear.
Good idea! My main line is clear, darn it!
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Old 06-03-2015, 11:27 PM   #848
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Came home to water on the kitchen floor in front of the fridge.

A quick search revealed it is a common problem with bottom freezer Whirlpool/Maytags.

The good news it is an easy fix: just open the back panel, pop off the drain grommet, clean it, melt the ice dam, and reinstall.

The bad news is that this evaporator drain clogs easily. There are thousands of hits on it. Problem is stuff like fuzz easily gets sucked into the freezer during normal opening and closing. Some of it will work its way back to the evaporator. This gets in the drain. The drain grommet is there to stop warm air backflow, but in turn catches every possible piece of debris. When the drain stops, it freezes up and eventually flows into the compartment and onto your floor.
Interesting. What does the grommet look like? Is it a duck-bill (the one-way flexible valve) or just a simple restriction? Is it something that you could force and keep wide open by adding a stent, like a piece of plastic drinking straw or the like?

Our Kenmore (made by Whirlpool then) top-freezer refrig developed an evaporator pan leak at about the 20 year mark. It was hard to find, a pin-hole leak in the galvanized steel pan that allowed water to run down inside the cabinet. It was frustratingly intermittent! I had to loosen the mounting for the evap coils inside the back of the freezer compartment to tilt and slide the pan out, and holding it up to a bright light, saw the pin-hole. I suspect it was a defect in the galvanizing. Only that one pin-hole, no rust anywhere else. A new pan was something like $10. With a new pan in, refrig went on with no problems, I later gave it away after I renovated the kitchen.
Replaced it with a Whirlpool side-by-side that was top-rated by CU. This refrig has electronics, have it plugged into a rated surge suppressor outlet strip that I fastened to the wall. We get lightning.
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Old 06-03-2015, 11:50 PM   #849
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Speaking of evaporator coil drains, it appears my main drain pan in my A/C coil in the attic is rusted thru and the condensation is leaking into my secondary pan. Just what I need....a 15 year old unit go south and the system is R22.

I know that replacing the inner pan is a pain as it is part of the coil housing.
Bummer! We have two A/C systems also attic mounted. The originals were true horizontal units, I replaced the one for the big part of the house at the 22 year mark. The horizontal evap coil cabinet had a vertical-mount flat coil in it. Later when I looked at the pieces I pulled out, the drain pan and the bottom of the case was just a rust mess. Surprised it hadn't leaked. With its flat-coil design, it would have been possible with some galvanized steel to repair and replace the pan and its supports.

Both replacement systems I installed are actually gas basement upflow furnaces and A-coils, but laid down on their sides. I lucked out in that the guts were installed at the factory so they could be laid down on their left sides, which is the way I needed. Otherwise, I would have had to unbolt everything inside and flip it over.
Unfortunately, I don't remember how the side drain pan for an A-coil that can be laid on it's side is attached, as to how difficult it would be to replace it in the field without discharging the system.
For an A-coil cabinet, there is usually a sheet metal access panel in the side of the cabinet that can be removed for coil cleaning, that would allow a peek inside, to see where the drain pan in use is, and how it is fastened, if it is a separate pan, and not integral with the bottom of the cabinet.
My bigger unit has a separate white plastic pan, and the white plastic can be seen where I attached the PVC pipes to for the drain line.
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Old 06-04-2015, 06:53 AM   #850
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Interesting. What does the grommet look like? Is it a duck-bill (the one-way flexible valve) or just a simple restriction? Is it something that you could force and keep wide open by adding a stent, like a piece of plastic drinking straw or the like?
Picture attached. Yes, you can force it open with a stent. But there's a downside to that. It will allow warm air to flow back, and even worse, a lot of dirt and fuzz to regurgitate backward. This is exiting below the fridge near the coils where dirt and fuzz are in abundance. Better to get the occasional dirt from inside the apartment above. We all think no dirt gets in our fridge, but you'd be surprised what gets in by the "air suction" during door action.

BTW, I'm just going to put the task of cleaning this beast on a 3 year maintenance window. Easier to do before the ice jam develops.
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File Type: jpg drain restrictor.JPG (41.5 KB, 9 views)
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:13 AM   #851
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I have 3 ongoing repairs. I have a malfunctioning traction control module in my corvette. I removed it, and sent it to a company to be refurbished. It should be back today, and I'll install it and see what happens. My boat motor has been running sluggish, so I'm putting in new fuel, seafoam, and changing the spark plugs. I'll clean the carb if that doesn't solve the problem. But my most important repair is my kegerator. I'm fixing a leaky faucet and swapping out the beer lines for new ones.
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:25 AM   #852
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Agree with priorities, gotta have the beer.
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Old 06-09-2015, 12:07 AM   #853
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Picture attached. Yes, you can force it open with a stent. But there's a downside to that. It will allow warm air to flow back, and even worse, a lot of dirt and fuzz to regurgitate backward. This is exiting below the fridge near the coils where dirt and fuzz are in abundance. Better to get the occasional dirt from inside the apartment above. We all think no dirt gets in our fridge, but you'd be surprised what gets in by the "air suction" during door action.

BTW, I'm just going to put the task of cleaning this beast on a 3 year maintenance window. Easier to do before the ice jam develops.
Thanks for the pics. Our earlier frig had good door seals, and it would take a little bit more effort to open a door a moment after closing it (cool air dumps out, replaced with warmer room air, close door, air cools and contracts creating partial vacuum until it equalizes through vent or drain tube). Our new frig, a moment after you close the door, it takes a very large increase in effort to open it. Worse with freezer door than frig door (makes sense with temperatures). Its like a time-lock. Close the door, then exert an even pull force on a handle, and wait... after it equalizes to equal the pull force, the door pops open. So I suspect our new one has a valve like yours somewhere.
I should find it, before I NEED to find it!
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:10 AM   #854
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My motorhome dashboard on the trip last year displayed the "Service Engine Soon" light, then that went away. On this year trip, it displayed that again intermittently.

At home now, I plugged in the OBD II reader that I bought but not used, and with a free software for an Android tablet, promptly retrieved two fault codes: P0171, P0174.

These 2 codes translated to "System Too Lean (Bank 1)" and "System Too Lean (Bank 2)". On the Web, they say that it could be something as simply as a loose hose clamp on the intake, letting air in past the airflow sensor.

I hope that the above to be the case, but will need to wait until tomorrow to poke around in the engine compartment.
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Old 06-09-2015, 12:21 PM   #855
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Kitchen drawer guide rail bracket broke in the back where it is attached to the back of the cabinet.


I've had these plastic brackets age and crack before and in the past I've replaced them. Takes some time to align the rail into the new bracket, ensure it is level, pre-drill the screw holes...etc...et al


I was lazy today - the top of the bracket was still intact - just the bottom portion broke off. So I used a zip tie around the top portion to make a loop that will support the guide rail.


Fixed and done in 1 minute.


And - it even afforded me the opportunity to declutter the drawer of items we haven't used/touched in years. Nice and neat now!
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:06 PM   #856
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Chipped front tooth. Dentist repaired it ($250) and it looks great. Also, got a mouth guard (another $300!) so I won't chip any more of them!
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:20 PM   #857
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Originally Posted by JoeWras View Post
Came home to water on the kitchen floor in front of the fridge.

A quick search revealed it is a common problem with bottom freezer Whirlpool/Maytags.

The good news it is an easy fix: just open the back panel, pop off the drain grommet, clean it, melt the ice dam, and reinstall.

The bad news is that this evaporator drain clogs easily. There are thousands of hits on it. Problem is stuff like fuzz easily gets sucked into the freezer during normal opening and closing. Some of it will work its way back to the evaporator. This gets in the drain. The drain grommet is there to stop warm air backflow, but in turn catches every possible piece of debris. When the drain stops, it freezes up and eventually flows into the compartment and onto your floor.
Joe-
Here's your fix; just did it myself. P trap tube replaces the duckbill grommet. Piece of cake & should be permanent. This vendor also has Youtube videos showing how. My question is, why the he** didn't they build it this way to begin with ?
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:01 PM   #858
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Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
My motorhome dashboard on the trip last year displayed the "Service Engine Soon" light, then that went away. On this year trip, it displayed that again intermittently.

At home now, I plugged in the OBD II reader that I bought but not used, and with a free software for an Android tablet, promptly retrieved two fault codes: P0171, P0174.

These 2 codes translated to "System Too Lean (Bank 1)" and "System Too Lean (Bank 2)". On the Web, they say that it could be something as simply as a loose hose clamp on the intake, letting air in past the airflow sensor.

I hope that the above to be the case, but will need to wait until tomorrow to poke around in the engine compartment.
Both suggestions are possibilities.
My 96 Cadillac SLS has thrown those two codes ever since we bought it in 2004. Happens when the car idles for any extended period in warm weather.
The onboard center in my car has an erase code ability, so i just reset and go for another 1000 or so miles before ith appens again. GMC forums are familiar with this problem.
When I brought it into a dealer back in 2005, he told me I'd need a new exhaust system @ about 3K... (catalytic converters etc.)

One recommended fix (check on line help) is to open the MAF (air flow ) hose and find the sensor... a tiny hair thin sensor that should only be cleaned with electronic cleaning fluid... not brake cleaner.

For the past 11 years, we're still getting about 22 mpg w/ the northstar engine... 28 on trips.
Others recommend changing the O2 sensors, but the Cadillac Forums that I go to say the MAF sensor is the most common . In my case, I've done neither, and as long as the problem is intermittent, I ain't agonna fix it.
Good luck!
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:34 PM   #859
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Thanks for the MAF cleaning suggestion. I will wait a couple of days to acclimatize back to the heat here at home before going out to work this problem.

As I check for vacuum leak, I will take the MAF off to clean the sensor wires too. My gas mileage has been erratic with last year's trip as well as the most recent one. My trips in 2010 and 2011 right after I bought the MH had a lot better mpg's.

Whatever I do, I will not know for sure that the problem is gone until I make another trip. Seems like a good excuse to hit the road again.
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Old 06-10-2015, 03:50 PM   #860
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Speaking of evaporator coil drains, it appears my main drain pan in my A/C coil in the attic is rusted thru and the condensation is leaking into my secondary pan. Just what I need....a 15 year old unit go south and the system is R22.

I know that replacing the inner pan is a pain as it is part of the coil housing.
The inner pan rusted through on my upstairs unit last summer. I still haven't fixed it or had it fixed, so it's dripping into the backup pan. Also R22. Mine is 22 years old, and builder installed "quality".

My plan was to fix it as soon as it warmed-up. Now it's too hot!
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