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Old 05-04-2016, 07:38 AM   #41
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Even with its challenges and its imperfections, though, there is one thing that is completely, undeniably, and perpetually awesome about being FIREd: sleeping as late as I want every morning and staying up as late as I want every night and having nearly complete control over my time and my comings-and-goings. I honestly don't feel like I could ever go back to the old 9-to-5, 5 days/week corporate life, having experienced and gotten used to this luxurious freedom for the past few years.
+1001 (nights)

About a year after "retiring" (I find it hard not to put it in quotes), I took on a temporary part-time stint not related to my original field. It required my getting up earlier than ever before several days a week. It was hell to shift to the new schedule, but I did it. Still, it took a toll and I couldn't wait to return to a schedule ruled by my body clock's tendency for late nights and late mornings. Any "work" (there are those quotes again) that I do in the future will not require an alarm clock!
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Old 05-04-2016, 07:47 AM   #42
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I really don't think boredom is going to be a problem. I also have lots of hobbies and would probably join a country club to golf/hang out. I'm more of a type A personality and make new friends quickly.
I'd examine this a bit more closely...

Forbes: How To Go From Type A To Type B In Retirement

Quote:
Because of who and what they are, Type A’s generally don’t do well in retirement. Type A’s need tasks and objectives and deadlines to keep themselves occupied. And Type A’s want to know precisely where they fit in and who they can manage or control, even though retirees have no organization chart. ...

In fact, in retirement, Type A’s are often ridiculed, ignored or shunned because of their heavy-handed, misguided, and uncompromising approaches to making friends and influencing people.
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Old 05-04-2016, 04:41 PM   #43
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Your advice is for me to give up the career/high level position I've worked 14 years to attain to test out not working? I don't think that's very wise or practical.

Very much agree on the personal advice. Actually, I'm not sure at this point if marriage is worth the risk because of divorce.
No. I mean take a sabbatical but make it a real sabbatical. Lots of people take time off work to recharge but then check email, come in once in a while, still attend meetings. I think if people do that's it's really different than test driving retirement.

Also I was surprised at how supportive a lot of work places are about that... and in many cases bosses admire it. It also forced me to put things into a state where I wasn't critical for day to day stuff... which changed my focus a bit.

Honestly I think all people should take 3-6 months off every few years. I think it would increase productivity and creativity and reduce burnout.

I think lots of people (including me for many years) thought that work was an all or nothing thing. It wasn't until I had the financial security to test the flexibility that I realized how flexible it is .

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Old 05-04-2016, 06:22 PM   #44
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No. I mean take a sabbatical but make it a real sabbatical.... I was surprised at how supportive a lot of work places are about that... and in many cases bosses admire it.... I think lots of people (including me for many years) thought that work was an all or nothing thing. It wasn't until I had the financial security to test the flexibility that I realized how flexible it is.
i think this advice is excellent if you can swing it at work: 'try before you buy' makes a lot of sense.

The problem is, many employers are anything but flexible, and taking (or even requesting) significant time off can be 'career limiting'; presumably that is the OP's concern. Of course, 'star' employees who possess skills or contacts that are in high demand will have more negotiating power than average workers, but by definition most of us are mediocre.

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I'd examine this a bit more closely...
Agreed. At the risk of generalizing, I suspect that an introverted, 'Type B' personality more often than not finds ER easier than an extroverted 'Type A'.
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:52 PM   #45
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Most of us are a mix of type A and type B. Rigidly organized and concerned with time management are not aspects of Type A I bring into my personal life (my vacations are always agenda-light.)

Is this the right analysis? Even if I was dead-on type A, would it be better for heath/stress to stay in the corporate rat race where those behaviors are stresses are fueled?

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I'd examine this a bit more closely...

Forbes: How To Go From Type A To Type B In Retirement
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:58 PM   #46
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I don't see how this is possible for anyone in a leadership role. Per Milton's reply below, yes, this would be a non-starter for me as it would be beyond career limiting.

For an all-star individual contributor, these kind of things are probably very doable, but not for my role.

I'd be worried about the flip side - not wanting to come back after 3 months!

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Originally Posted by petershk View Post
No. I mean take a sabbatical but make it a real sabbatical. Lots of people take time off work to recharge but then check email, come in once in a while, still attend meetings. I think if people do that's it's really different than test driving retirement.

Also I was surprised at how supportive a lot of work places are about that... and in many cases bosses admire it. It also forced me to put things into a state where I wasn't critical for day to day stuff... which changed my focus a bit.

Honestly I think all people should take 3-6 months off every few years. I think it would increase productivity and creativity and reduce burnout.

I think lots of people (including me for many years) thought that work was an all or nothing thing. It wasn't until I had the financial security to test the flexibility that I realized how flexible it is .

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Old 05-05-2016, 11:21 PM   #47
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IIt's highly workplace dependent I suspect... but I am/was in a leadership role and didn't have a problem... in fact my peers and seniors were supportive because just like me... they probably feel the same way. The feeling of "omfg if I leave for more than 1 week the company will be harmed and my career will suffer huge loss because people will question my commitment, etc."

That's EXACTLY how I used to think. No longer. It's a catch 22 but I don't want to work at a place where if I take a month or two off :

A. the place collapses which means I haven't set things up to be very robust

B. I lose tons of face. Not because o screwed up but because people value amount of time in the office not actual results or value .

So if requesting time off to recharge and saying I will set things up to function while I'm gone results in a super negative reaction... time for a new job because I suspect the work environment doesn't match what I think makes sense. Not that it's wrong... just misaligned.

I suspect (but can't prove) that more places are flexible than we think. Before I took time off.. and requested it... I was really anxious about both those things. Now I'm not.

Your second point is the bigger risk . But then if you can afford to leave now and don't want to go back... maybe it's not worth the extra financial security... but maybe it is.

The biggest thing for me is the feeling of having control over my life decisions instead of trying to work out what everyone else expects/demands

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Old 05-06-2016, 12:09 AM   #48
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Been lurking here a while, so wanted to get everyone's thoughts about my situation. I've always been "good with saving" having learned this from my parents, who were of modest means for most of my life. Sadly, my father passed away this past year, and now that I'm managing Mom's finances, come to find out he had accumulated nearly $3 million in assets (mostly from inheritance from my grandparents, which kept compounding.) My father worked hard until age 69, and only saw 2 years of retirement, mostly in poor health. Unknown to any of us at the time since he kept everyone in the dark about the money, he could have retired 10 years earlier.

I'm determined not to follow a similar path. I work for a mega corp and am doing well, I just can't see myself being a "lifer". I know many lower level execs that could have retired decades ago, but continue to work because that's their entire identity (my aunt is similar.) That scares me, there's more to life than that, and I work way too much now to want to keep up this pace.

My situation is as follows:
Taxable Investments (all liquid, stocks/bonds): $700k
401k: $200k
Income: $250k/year gross, $170k/year net (though various promotions and healthy bonuses my salary is up a lot recently)
Expenses: $4-5k/month

So saving $100-120k/year

Inheritance: I'll likely have a sizable one at some point in the future. Mom is 64. I'd be quite happy if I never saw a nickle for 30 years.
Houses: I own none, having owned 2 for many years. The freedom is priceless.

I don't live extravagantly, but walking away from a job I like and then having to every worry about money later seems crazy. I'm particularly concerned about the cost of health insurance and lower expected investment returns over the next 30 years, and knowing I'd retired, I would expect my spending to increase over its current levels, though perhaps not drastically.

Given the above situation, wen would you walk away?
Tell me what you're walking away TO, not FROM. Then you may have my answer.

Tough situation. Don't be your dad; on the other hand, your dad's willingness to work nose to the grindstone for all those years is why you will probably inherit 7 figures at some point. Which is the only reason we're having this conversation.

I think it's too early to back off, but you might think about a 10 year plan: to get into some long term housing; to think about life after RE; to think about a family. Get that all lined up and see where you're at in five years.
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Old 05-06-2016, 01:47 PM   #49
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From (the BAD): 100 Days a year on the road for work, 50+ hour weeks, commuting, meetings, email, being indoor and on computers most of the waking hours, the Northeast climate in the winter, limited free time to pursue hobbies

From (the Good): Helping creating a product that positively impacts people's lives, a big income, working with smart people, helping people in the careers.

To: Warmer climates (in winter months) a more active lifestyle, hobbies, less stress

Your comment below about me potentially inheriting 7 figures being the reason for this conversation is both wrong and obnoxious. I'm already a millionaire, any inheritance getting split 4 ways, and while someday it might be helpful in no way factors into my planning. I don't want a dime of his money and never will, and I'm upset he didn't get to enjoy more of his time with my mother.

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Tell me what you're walking away TO, not
FROM. Then you may have my answer.

Tough situation. Don't be your dad; on the other hand, your dad's willingness to work nose to the grindstone for all those years is why you will probably inherit 7 figures at some point. Which is the only reason we're having this conversation.

I think it's too early to back off, but you might think about a 10 year plan: to get into some long term housing; to think about life after RE; to think about a family. Get that all lined up and see where you're at in five years.
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Old 05-06-2016, 01:56 PM   #50
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At one point here I felt like I couldn't leave without at least checking email for a week, but not anymore. I could get away with a month.

It's all risk/rewards to me. Not worth the risk (whether it's perceived or real) to try this at this point, but certainly food for thought.

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Originally Posted by petershk View Post
IIt's highly workplace dependent I suspect... but I am/was in a leadership role and didn't have a problem... in fact my peers and seniors were supportive because just like me... they probably feel the same way. The feeling of "omfg if I leave for more than 1 week the company will be harmed and my career will suffer huge loss because people will question my commitment, etc."

That's EXACTLY how I used to think. No longer. It's a catch 22 but I don't want to work at a place where if I take a month or two off :

A. the place collapses which means I haven't set things up to be very robust

B. I lose tons of face. Not because o screwed up but because people value amount of time in the office not actual results or value .

So if requesting time off to recharge and saying I will set things up to function while I'm gone results in a super negative reaction... time for a new job because I suspect the work environment doesn't match what I think makes sense. Not that it's wrong... just misaligned.

I suspect (but can't prove) that more places are flexible than we think. Before I took time off.. and requested it... I was really anxious about both those things. Now I'm not.

Your second point is the bigger risk . But then if you can afford to leave now and don't want to go back... maybe it's not worth the extra financial security... but maybe it is.

The biggest thing for me is the feeling of having control over my life decisions instead of trying to work out what everyone else expects/demands

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
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