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Old 07-17-2012, 11:33 AM   #61
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I am a few years behind this with my kids however my oldest who is going into high school this year is beginning to think about what he wants to do. And he is noticing the things that I do. My tactic with him is to talk about functional skills that would apply to multiple areas. For example when we see the kid at the fast food I ask my son “what is that kid doing”. Answer usually involves something like “taking my order Dad.” I then dive into the 2nd order tasks and what the kid has to know take the order. I sometimes get questions like “Dad is that a good job.”
I talk to him about what type of life he wants to have and what type of interaction he wants to have with people. I also ask him what type of stuff he likes and what type of environment he wants to spend his time. And I think he is listening. In fact he is listening too much and really thumps me in the chest from time to time. For example, A few months ago he picked up that I was really struggling with a work issue. He asked me “if you don’t like it why do you do it?” “Seems to me that Dad you should do something you enjoy.”
Recently I received a job offer utilizing my skills in a completely different area. When I told him about it and asked him what he thought he replied, “I think that would be important Dad as you would be helping people.” My thoughts to that point were more about the logistical side and what subset of my skills I would be improving. In his mind it is real simple. Geez how did I miss that!
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Old 07-17-2012, 12:51 PM   #62
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My son enjoyed sailing. He noticed that adults in his moorage used their boat on the weekend and then spent time cleaning it. He realized that there were opportunities for cabin cleaning, a business he could do after school.

Leaving out several years (graduating from Cal Maritime, sailing merchant ships) he and his wife own and operate a boat yard.
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Old 08-18-2012, 08:58 PM   #63
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I agree with many others - tell him to find his passion, something he enjoys learning about.. My nephew was involved with 4H and began raising/showing pigs. He loved the animals and learning, reading about them. He is now at Ohio State Vet school on a full scholarship - it's something he's always loved and is so excited about his future career of caring for farm animals.

And I'd suggest you teach your son to become financially responsible early on in life (while still a youngster). Let him EARN an allowance and save part, spend part. Doesn't matter how much you make if you can't manage and budget what you do have.
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Old 08-21-2012, 12:47 PM   #64
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Tell him to pursue a career that he likes that will bring dignity to himself and his family.
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Old 08-21-2012, 01:38 PM   #65
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Tell him to pursue a career that he likes that will bring dignity to himself and his family.
Yeah, but what if he chooses to be a lawyer or a politician?
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Old 08-21-2012, 04:24 PM   #66
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Yeah, but what if he chooses to be a lawyer or a politician?
Then he will be a standout because of his uniqueness.

Also, it depends on how one defines dignity.
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:12 PM   #67
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Also, it depends on how one defines dignity.
So we're no longer discussing the occupation, but rather haggling over the price?
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:46 PM   #68
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So we're no longer discussing the occupation, but rather haggling over the price?
This is how I see it. In one family being a lawyer may be the noblest of professions. In another, it may be considered an undignified one. The specifics will vary.
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:59 PM   #69
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So we're no longer discussing the occupation, but rather haggling over the price?

Reminds me of the old joke where a billionaire propositions a married woman. When she refuses, he says "how about for a million?" She demurs and he ups his offers until she finally agrees. When he starts ordering her around to do this and that she asks,"what do you think I am, a whore?" Answer: We already established that, it was just a matter of price.
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:15 PM   #70
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So we're no longer discussing the occupation, but rather haggling over the price?
Got that quick enough. Had trouble with there is no dignity in any work implications. Is this what you mean?
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:40 PM   #71
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My suggestion would be to sit down at a regional Help Wanted site like this
Central New York Area job search and jobs posting. Find a high quality employee. Find the perfect job.

and have your son look at various detailed job descriptions by category.

Another possibility is for him to register with a Temp agency (I am assuming he is 18 or older) and see what they think he would be good at. If he is not in a tough financial position, he could try a few different PT or FT j*bs in various fields/different employers and see what clicks.
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Old 08-22-2012, 10:24 PM   #72
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I just don't understand why people advise doing what you love as a way to choose a career. It isn't always possible to earn enough to live on, doing what you love.

I don't have any children, but if I did, I'd advise them to learn a trade, then earn, save and invest to achieve financial independence no later than age 50. A trade, because plumbers, carpenters, electricians, mechanics and the like have to be physically present to do the work, which makes it harder for your employer to offshore your job. If you're of an entrepreneurial bent, you can have your own business in a trade; if not, you can work for someone else as an employee. Financially independent by age 50, because of age discrimination--if you lose your job after that age, you may never find another that pays as well, so be prepared not to need to.

I do think Freebird's idea of working temporary jobs is a good one. Even though I don't think it's practical to choose your work by what you love, it makes sense to pick one that won't make you miserable, and you can find that out by working a variety of temp or PT assignments.
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Old 08-24-2012, 12:11 PM   #73
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I just don't understand why people advise doing what you love as a way to choose a career. It isn't always possible to earn enough to live on, doing what you love.

I don't have any children, but if I did, I'd advise them to learn a trade, then earn, save and invest to achieve financial independence no later than age 50. A trade, because plumbers, carpenters, electricians, mechanics and the like have to be physically present to do the work, which makes it harder for your employer to offshore your job. If you're of an entrepreneurial bent, you can have your own business in a trade; if not, you can work for someone else as an employee. Financially independent by age 50, because of age discrimination--if you lose your job after that age, you may never find another that pays as well, so be prepared not to need to.

I do think Freebird's idea of working temporary jobs is a good one. Even though I don't think it's practical to choose your work by what you love, it makes sense to pick one that won't make you miserable, and you can find that out by working a variety of temp or PT assignments.
+1 This provides a much better alternative for most young people to the college situation IMHO and is almost universally overlooked. The only down side is that just like some people are not cut out to go to college, so it is that some people are not cut out for the trades.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:53 PM   #74
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Ok, I'll make it easy for everyone who may still be coming back to this thread.

Here's the self-proclaimed "best job in the world"
with the "best benefits in the world"

Firefighter Benefits and Salary

Yes, I am biased.

R/
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:04 PM   #75
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Ok, I'll make it easy for everyone who may still be coming back to this thread.

Here's the self-proclaimed "best job in the world"
with the "best benefits in the world"

Firefighter Benefits and Salary

Yes, I am biased.

R/
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Firefighters deserve every benefit they can get because they take tremendous risks on behalf of the rest of us!
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:09 AM   #76
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Firefighters deserve every benefit they can get because they take tremendous risks on behalf of the rest of us!
Statistics do not prove these risks.
Why do you think fishermen and loggers (and ten other professions more risky than firefighters according to Bureau of Labor Statistics) do not deserve comparable benefits?
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:25 AM   #77
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Statistics do not prove these risks.
Why do you think fishermen and loggers (and ten other professions more risky than firefighters according to Bureau of Labor Statistics) do not deserve comparable benefits?
As Meadbh said
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Firefighters deserve every benefit they can get because they take tremendous risks on behalf of the rest of us!
Same for Police and Military. Their risk is our benefit.
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:49 AM   #78
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As Meadbh said
Same for Police and Military. Their risk is our benefit.
You don't eat fish?
And have no wood furniture and don't use paper?
And you dispose yourself of all your garbage?
And... ?

I think it can be said for all 20 most dangerous jobs listed (I'm glad that the list did not include telemarketers though!) - their risk is our benefit.

Why other risky occupations don't deserve every benefit they can get?
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Old 08-29-2012, 11:15 AM   #79
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You don't eat fish?
And have no wood furniture and don't use paper?
And you dispose yourself of all your garbage?
And... ?

I think it can be said for all 20 most dangerous jobs listed (I'm glad that the list did not include telemarketers though!) - their risk is our benefit.

Why other risky occupations don't deserve every benefit they can get?
Sure I do. We eat fish, have wood furniture, use paper, etc. We pay for all those services and those that undertake to provide them do so to earn money. A fisherman is free to choose to go out in a storm or fish in dangerous waters, and a logger can choose to cut a difficult tree or pass it by - just to name a few factors that make their professions dangerous.

A soldier cannot choose which battles to engage in, a policeman cannot choose which confrontations to avoid because they are too dangerous, and most certainly a firefighter cannot choose which burning buildings to enter in search of trapped civilians. In fact, the greater the danger the less choice those individuals have. They not only take on risk for our benefit, they also do so for our collective and individual safety.

It is not only the danger but also the nature of the choice the individuals make. In the specific case of firefighters, I think that many are underpaid while othes have figured out how to game the system, and too much local government has failed to adequately provision the commitments extended to them.
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:51 PM   #80
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... A fisherman is free to choose to go out in a storm or fish in dangerous waters, and a logger can choose to cut a difficult tree or pass it by - just to name a few factors that make their professions dangerous.

... a policeman cannot choose which confrontations to avoid because they are too dangerous, and most certainly a firefighter cannot choose which burning buildings to enter in search of trapped civilians.
I would think that a significant part of the dangers in fishing and logging are not just poor decisions that could have been easily avoided, those jobs are inherently dangerous. And I suppose some of the dangers in firefighting and police work are due to poor decisions.

I knew a bunch of old farmers, and there were quite a few fingers and limbs missing, a friend of mine lost an eye when a hay mower threw up a stone. They were doing their job, with dangerous machinery. It's part of farming, powerful tractors, machines that cut stuff in fields - you can't put safety guards on everything in nature, you can't remove every stone in a 400 acre field. Some of them maybe were avoidable, I don't know, but I know some weren't. If you are bringing in hay bales, you use a hay-hook. It's got to be sharp. The tractor hits a bump, you fall off, and the hay hook ends up in your thigh, miles out in a field, and your tractor goes about 5 miles an hour - your only path to help. Fields have bumps and stones, hay hooks are sharp - if the farmer decides not to bring in the hay, after it's been cut and a rain is approaching (which will cause it all to rot and be useless), he's not going to be a farmer for long. You can't just choose not to confront the danger in that job, it's part of the job too.

True, police or firefighters can't pick and choose the confrontation, but they did choose the career. Some of them thrive on the danger - they'd rather die than be a cube rat for 40 years. But a bunch of cube rats designed the firetruck, the two-way radios that help keep them safe, some assembly line worker put those together, or sewed their fire-resistant uniform or bullet-proof vest. Farmers feed them.

Just as I appreciate that there are firefighters and police that will do a very tough job many of us wouldn't or couldn't do, they should appreciate there are cube rats and others to support them. Does everyone deserve some huge benefit program, because we are all important in our own ways?

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