Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Faking your way through a career break
Old 01-28-2011, 02:13 PM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
Gerbil Wheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 83
Faking your way through a career break

So you want to take a career break? A mini-retirement? It could be a career-limiting move. Or not.

But what is your strategy to re-enter the workforce?

The older I get, the more convinced I am that perceptions are reality.

So why not manipulate the perceptions of employers?

FAKE LIKE YOU WERE REALLY RETIRED!

When you are ready for the career break, tell your boss and co-workers that you are really retiring.

Tell 'em you don't need the money!

Take your career break, and afterwards, tell your old employer/potential employers that you got bored and want to work again.

Think about it...what would go over better with an employer?

A. I took a career break, and now I am ready to work again. (= we are suspicious...why should we hire this person?)
B. I retired and realized that I missed working. (= we need this person more than they need us)

Of course, this creates a tangled web of deceit to manage.

(Anyone ever tried this?)
__________________

__________________
Gerbil Wheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-28-2011, 02:37 PM   #2
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 131
Why fake it?

Yet I do see your point. However, I also think whether an employer would wish to hire a "desperate person" (one who needs to work for his money) depends on the field.

For example, you'd probably want a desperate salesman ... nothing like eating dog food to motivate a sale. You might also want a desperate button-pusher on an assembly line, a desperate burger flipper, or a desperate paper-pusher.

On the other hand, you wouldn't want a desperate artist or a desperate researcher; if they spend time thinking about where the money for the next rent check is coming from, they're not spending time thinking about their work. You know, the kind of people, where the ideal management strategy is in ensuring that they are not hassled and just allowed to do their own work.

So to make a general statement... desperation helps when productivity is strongly correlated to hours worked or physical activity. Whereas it is counterproductive if productivity is correlated to creative insights.

I for one wouldn't want to hire a desperate money manager.
__________________

__________________
FI@30, ERE@33.
jacob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 02:45 PM   #3
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,936
One of the people in DW's office retired. He then invested a good chunk of his retirement money in oil wells through a guy he met at his church. He is now back at work. You could use that as an excuse, even call it private investment management.
__________________
Angels danced on the day that you were born.
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 12:19 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerbil Wheel View Post
A. I took a career break, and now I am ready to work again. (= we are suspicious...why should we hire this person?)
B. I retired and realized that I missed working. (= we need this person more than they need us)
(Anyone ever tried this?)
I did the first part of step "A" in 2002, but I still don't feel ready to work again. So I'm going to hold off step "B" until I feel ready to finish step "A".

I'll let you know if just as soon as that happens...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 10:11 AM   #5
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,934
I dunno. I was more of a "bird in the hand" type of woman when I was working. In other words, as long as I had a job with decent pay, my inclination was to tough it out and work until I was truly FI (whether I wanted to quit temporarily or not). Getting another really good job is always an iffy proposition IMO, especially in this economy and moreso as we grow older.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 10:48 AM   #6
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 189
One other thing one can try to pretend to be a self employed consultant and demand very high rates. Still there is some work involved, may be 2 hours a week to update skills, search. In case one gets a contract then it may be a small windfall. Working as a contractor is more tax efficient and I think saving rate would be at least double of working fulltime.
__________________
landover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 01:17 PM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
vicente solano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I dunno. I was more of a "bird in the hand" type of woman when I was working. In other words, as long as I had a job with decent pay, my inclination was to tough it out and work until I was truly FI (whether I wanted to quit temporarily or not). Getting another really good job is always an iffy proposition IMO, especially in this economy and moreso as we grow older.
Same thinking here. Even now I would be hard put to tell which job would be to my liking!
Truth is I wasn´t born a natural hard worker. I´, aware that for some of you USA citizens this amounts to a quasi-sin, but ..... I am in Spain, where we have this saying that goes something like "if working is good health ....long live TB!
__________________
I get by with a little help from my friends....ta ta ta ta ta...
vicente solano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 01:39 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerbil Wheel View Post
So you want to take a career break? A mini-retirement? It could be a career-limiting move. Or not.

But what is your strategy to re-enter the workforce?

The older I get, the more convinced I am that perceptions are reality.

So why not manipulate the perceptions of employers?

FAKE LIKE YOU WERE REALLY RETIRED!

When you are ready for the career break, tell your boss and co-workers that you are really retiring.

Tell 'em you don't need the money!

Take your career break, and afterwards, tell your old employer/potential employers that you got bored and want to work again.

Think about it...what would go over better with an employer?

A. I took a career break, and now I am ready to work again. (= we are suspicious...why should we hire this person?)
B. I retired and realized that I missed working. (= we need this person more than they need us)

Of course, this creates a tangled web of deceit to manage.

(Anyone ever tried this?)
They may see you as an unreliable quitter who will lose interest again.
__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2011, 07:44 PM   #9
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Los Altos
Posts: 30
I'm with W2R. I've got not more than 3 more years to gut it out at my current gig and then it's over. Forever. There will be no going back.

But I applaud your diabolicalness. . .
__________________
BizzyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2011, 08:10 PM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
Budman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 120
I'm also with W2R. I was happy to have my job, even though I didn't like the stress of it at times. It paid well, and would be hard to replace...heck it was hard to just obtain it through the dang interview process. Glad I never had to do that again.
__________________
My beer has a hole in it!
Budman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 07:00 AM   #11
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by landover View Post
One other thing one can try to pretend to be a self employed consultant and demand very high rates. Still there is some work involved, may be 2 hours a week to update skills, search. In case one gets a contract then it may be a small windfall. Working as a contractor is more tax efficient and I think saving rate would be at least double of working fulltime.
Very true - very true!!!!!

If you cover your costs and make some profit, then the IRS is happy - and if you really don't need the money you can set up one of those charitable mutual fund trust thingies.
__________________
Deserat aka Bridget
“We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.” - George Orwell/Winston Churchill
deserat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 09:54 AM   #12
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I dunno. I was more of a "bird in the hand" type of woman when I was working. In other words, as long as I had a job with decent pay, my inclination was to tough it out and work until I was truly FI (whether I wanted to quit temporarily or not). Getting another really good job is always an iffy proposition IMO, especially in this economy and moreso as we grow older.
Agreed. Just as there's a saying in business that it's a lot cheaper to keep an existing customer than to attract a new one, it's also a lot easier (assuming the employer isn't struggling too much) to keep a current j*b than to find a new one if you need it later.

I lived in Silicon Valley in the late 1990s when anyone with a pulse and a technical degree could find a j*b, but these aren't those times.
__________________

__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need a break. For good. welldone Hi, I am... 10 08-27-2008 09:55 AM
Break Time aaronc879 Other topics 5 02-13-2008 07:11 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:28 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.