Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-30-2016, 06:12 PM   #41
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,526
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
You just need to have several million $$$$$ or be living on $15K per year, that's all.
A mere $1.5 million dropped in the SP500 spits out $31,500 at today's 2.1% yield. That plus a paid off house in a low COL area is a pretty decent but basic retirement.
__________________

__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-30-2016, 06:41 PM   #42
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by FUEGO View Post
A mere $1.5 million dropped in the SP500 spits out $31,500 at today's 2.1% yield. That plus a paid off house in a low COL area is a pretty decent but basic retirement.
I'm sure a lot of people are doing that on SS alone these days.
__________________

__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 07:15 PM   #43
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
You just need to have several million $$$$$ or be living on $15K per year, that's all.
Or only plan to be alive until next Tuesday.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 07:19 PM   #44
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
Focus was referring to living off the "interest only", not multiple income streams.
But most posters here are going to get at least some SS as well eventually, and some will have pensions, so no need to live only off portfolio income alone forever.
__________________
Even clouds seem bright and breezy, 'Cause the livin' is free and easy, See the rat race in a new way, Like you're wakin' up to a new day (Dr. Tarr and Professor Fether lyrics, Alan Parsons Project, based on an EA Poe story)
daylatedollarshort is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 07:49 PM   #45
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: philly
Posts: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobbieB View Post
I didn't get the article either. Me thinks he is some "lost soul" out there seeking...

Whatever he's not found yet.
+1

Personally he just sounds like a person who hasn't found the "joy" of today because he's always focusing on something other than the present.

My vacations have lived up to my expectations maybe because I tend to be very, very grateful to be where I'm at. Lol, my honeymoon was spent on the island of Jamaica during one of the worst hurricanes of that decade and I was happy as a pig in slop because for me the object of it was to be with my sweetie.

I love eating out, my son's and I are on a quest to find the best pizza in Philly. Do I stress if I have to wait for a menu? WTH, is this guy 5??

I'm only two months into retirement but so far I'm a happy camper
__________________
bclover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:36 PM   #46
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,526
Quote:
Originally Posted by bclover View Post
I love eating out, my son's and I are on a quest to find the best pizza in Philly. Do I stress if I have to wait for a menu? WTH, is this guy 5??
The best part about this quest is finding the second, third, fourth, fifth, etc best pizza places in Philly. Even bad pizza is better than going hungry.
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:36 PM   #47
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by FUEGO View Post
A mere $1.5 million dropped in the SP500 spits out $31,500 at today's 2.1% yield. That plus a paid off house in a low COL area is a pretty decent but basic retirement.

And it's not too hard to get more than 2.1% if that's what you want. My portfolio yields 2.75% and it's a total return portfolio, not at all geared at maxing dividend/interest income.
__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:41 PM   #48
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Mulligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,369
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
Or multiple income streams in addition to dividend / interest types of income. Or Mulligan's utility preferred stock dividends, which I still need to look into.


I love my utility preferred stocks. You will have to pry them from my cold dead hands. And Coolius is worse. In his will they cannot be sold until the 3rd generation receives the inheritance! You have to be careful though with price point... We are on another forum that focus's on income and preferreds investing instead of the normal traditional total return route that is more standard here. Before I mentioned it nobody had heard of Connecticut Light and Power. Now its a cult issue as a relative feeding frenzy has occurred on some of these investment grade "high yield" illiquids.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Mulligan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:42 PM   #49
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,526
Quote:
Originally Posted by tulak View Post
And it's not too hard to get more than 2.1% if that's what you want. My portfolio yields 2.75% and it's a total return portfolio, not at all geared at maxing dividend/interest income.
Good point. My portfolio yielded 2.44% and it's a near-100% equities portfolio spread around the globe with small caps, emerging markets, REITs, etc. No dividend focus at all.
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 10:43 PM   #50
Full time employment: Posting here.
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 545
OP here and it's really encouraging that all the ERs are so contended with ER. The article raised a legitimate question to me about whether my own intense focus on FIRE in recent years is a symptom of a work life that's out of whack largely due to managers I dislike and other work BS. Do I want to FIRE or is it simply my fight or flight mode kicking in? Maybe I'm over-thinking things but a key line in the article resonated with how I'm feeling:

..."The ease itself we can find much more readily by understanding our wants rather than scrambling to relieve them..."

After pondering it for a few days and reading the responses above, my answers are:

1) Yes! I have found that I'm a lot happier with a better manager after changing organizations a month ago, and
2) Yes! I'm still as focused on FIRE as ever. There are bigger reasons that I want to FIRE than simply escaping the confines of a professional career and poor management. Like many above who have FIRED, I want freedom and my time to myself. If present trends continue, 5-7 years and I can afford to hang it up in my mid-late 50s at our current lifestyle, which will be well ahead of most everyone I know. Cheers!
__________________
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2016, 08:58 AM   #51
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Markola, I totally get the pondering. Sometimes I wonder what I'm chasing with such a vengeance, and if it is just the chasing that I find so appealing, in a goal-oriented sort of way. Sometimes I worry about the retiring from, instead of the retiring to, conundrum. But again, I return to the simple freedom of time, even if all I really do with my spare time sometiomes is...nothing.
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2016, 07:20 AM   #52
Full time employment: Posting here.
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 545
Sarah in SC, I grew up next door to you in GA and, thinking back, my role models for FIRE were my grandparents, who were retired by the time I became aware. I never saw them work for money but they had full lives. If they wanted to take us fishing every day for a week, we went fishing. If they wanted to shell peas or clean fresh-picked sweet corn, they did, usually with friends while telling stories and making it fun. If my grandfather wanted to "go see how high/low the river was " aka have a tall Schlitz in the truck, we did. They were fully alive people and, to us kids, their lives were a lot more appealing than the adults who disappeared for the best part of every day. The only time our grandparents ditched us was when it was time for As The World Turns. I don't think they retired to anything, in particular, except their lives. I really think that's what drives me.
__________________
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2016, 08:31 AM   #53
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Quote:
Once there were five-year-old twin boys,
one a pessimist and the other an optimist.
Wondering how two boys who seemed so alike could
be so different, their parents took them to a psychiatrist.

The psychiatrist took the pessimist to a room piled high
with new toys, expecting the boy to be thrilled. But instead
he burst into tears. Puzzled, the psychiatrist asked,
"don't you want to play with these toys?"
"Yes," the little boy bawled,
"but if I did I'd only break them."


Next the psychiatrist took the optimist to a room piled high
with horse manure. The boy yelped with delight, clambered
to the top of the pile, and joyfully dug out scoop after scoop,
tossing the manure into the air with glee.
"What on earth are you doing?" the psychiatrist asked.
"Well,” said the boy, beaming

“There’s got to be a pony in here somewhere!"

27 years later... still lovin' the search for that pony!
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2016, 09:35 AM   #54
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markola View Post
Sarah in SC, I grew up next door to you in GA and, thinking back, my role models for FIRE were my grandparents, who were retired by the time I became aware. I never saw them work for money but they had full lives. If they wanted to take us fishing every day for a week, we went fishing. If they wanted to shell peas or clean fresh-picked sweet corn, they did, usually with friends while telling stories and making it fun. If my grandfather wanted to "go see how high/low the river was " aka have a tall Schlitz in the truck, we did. They were fully alive people and, to us kids, their lives were a lot more appealing than the adults who disappeared for the best part of every day. The only time our grandparents ditched us was when it was time for As The World Turns. I don't think they retired to anything, in particular, except their lives. I really think that's what drives me.
Awww, you just reminded me of such great memories with my grandparents, especially my grandmother. And yes, she would shush us up when the stories came on! It's true, there is nothing so appealing to us, even long after childhood, than stretches of time spent with good people, doing just what we want. Thank you.
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2016, 11:34 PM   #55
Full time employment: Posting here.
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
27 years later... still lovin' the search for that pony!
Imoldernu, Thanks for that post. I can't say I choose optimism every time but I try to remember it is a choice and then pull that lever. Lately, I've been choosing to read this forum and articles like the one I posted at the top rather than the news and such.
__________________
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 10:23 AM   #56
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 7,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
27 years later... still lovin' the search for that pony!
I know. After 22 years of ER some days it's very hard to to stay grumpy.

heh heh heh -
__________________
unclemick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 03:01 PM   #57
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
Markola, I totally get the pondering. Sometimes I wonder what I'm chasing with such a vengeance, and if it is just the chasing that I find so appealing, in a goal-oriented sort of way. Sometimes I worry about the retiring from, instead of the retiring to, conundrum. But again, I return to the simple freedom of time, even if all I really do with my spare time sometimes is...nothing.
I sort of wondered the same thing for a while. But your last sentence about covers it. For a long time after retirement I thought I should be "doing something" but then I thought "Why? Who says I have to do anything? I'm retired, and if I don't want to do anything then that's what I'm gonna do!"

Today I didn't do much of anything. I flew an R/C helicopter a few times in the front yard, read up some more on putting a video camera in an R/C model and figuring out how to record video from a system I don't even have yet. (I'll probably end up asking some of the engineers here about it later.) And of course spend some time on this forum.

But isn't that part of the point of being retired? To do what you want to do when you want to do it and not have to care what anyone else thinks? Well, within reason and common decency of course.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 06:54 PM   #58
Full time employment: Posting here.
UnrealizedPotential's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I sort of wondered the same thing for a while. But your last sentence about covers it. For a long time after retirement I thought I should be "doing something" but then I thought "Why? Who says I have to do anything? I'm retired, and if I don't want to do anything then that's what I'm gonna do!"

Today I didn't do much of anything. I flew an R/C helicopter a few times in the front yard, read up some more on putting a video camera in an R/C model and figuring out how to record video from a system I don't even have yet. (I'll probably end up asking some of the engineers here about it later.) And of course spend some time on this forum.

But isn't that part of the point of being retired? To do what you want to do when you want to do it and not have to care what anyone else thinks? Well, within reason and common decency of course.
Well I have not done much since I quit my job in May. I love it so far. I do have plans to keep myself busy but I have not acted on it yet and I am not in a hurry to do so. Maybe next week or....
__________________
Understanding both the power of compound interest and the difficulty of getting it is the heart and soul of understanding a lot of things. Charlie Munger
UnrealizedPotential is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 08:56 PM   #59
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markola View Post
. They were fully alive people and, to us kids, their lives were a lot more appealing than the adults who disappeared for the best part of every day. The only time our grandparents ditched us was when it was time for As The World Turns. I don't think they retired to anything, in particular, except their lives. I really think that's what drives me.
Great post but in todays world grandparents are supposed to wear fitbits and travel to exotic places . They also do yoga and have highlights . They hit the gym five days a week and own matching kayaks. Retirement for grandparents is now too busy for soaps or a beer at the river but martini's at happy hour are okay .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 09:50 PM   #60
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ExFlyBoy5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I sort of wondered the same thing for a while. But your last sentence about covers it. For a long time after retirement I thought I should be "doing something" but then I thought "Why? Who says I have to do anything? I'm retired, and if I don't want to do anything then that's what I'm gonna do!"

Today I didn't do much of anything. I flew an R/C helicopter a few times in the front yard, read up some more on putting a video camera in an R/C model and figuring out how to record video from a system I don't even have yet. (I'll probably end up asking some of the engineers here about it later.) And of course spend some time on this forum.

But isn't that part of the point of being retired? To do what you want to do when you want to do it and not have to care what anyone else thinks? Well, within reason and common decency of course.
This.

The best part of being retired (for me, that is) is the freedom to do as I wish, when I wish. If the weather is disagreeable to me in the least, I can just stay home. Procrastination becomes freedom.

Sent via mobile device. Please excuse any grammatical errors.
__________________

__________________
Founder and Head Lounger @ The Life of Leisure Institute
Retired in 2014 at the Ripe Age of 40.
ExFlyBoy5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HI All, After Long Absence I'm & Retired, By Injury, By Choice (1 Month) rjohnla Hi, I am... 12 09-27-2015 11:00 AM
Home Monitoring for Extended Absence chinaco Travel Information 44 04-05-2013 02:57 PM
Leave of Absence (Trial Retirement) over, getting ready to go back DivinDave Hi, I am... 23 02-10-2013 09:39 AM
Absence of Primary Care Drs. SteveL Health and Early Retirement 19 01-06-2009 05:40 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:44 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.