Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
More Current Personal Finance Books
Old 07-11-2013, 02:31 AM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: NA
Posts: 55
More Current Personal Finance Books

I am currently loading up my Kindle for summer holidays, and while I have a healthy dose of fiction, and a few of the 'classic' personal finance books yet to read, I was wondering if anyone could recommend some more time-relevant finance reads. I am looking for anything post-2008 (or at least post 2001) that covers wealth accumulation, or investing with the present environment in mind.

I have really benefited from reading books like The Millionaire Next Door, Stop Acting Rich, The Richest Man in Babylon, Think and Grow Rich, Rich Dad Poor Dad, A Random Walk Down Wallstreet, etc. but I feel that they are all a little dated now. I often feel like saying, 'Sure, that would work then, but this is now'.

Has anyone read anything good that would guide an early-30s investor in this era of low interest rates, QE, secular bear market, asset bubbles, and government-intervention?
__________________

__________________
BigBangWeary is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-11-2013, 03:11 AM   #2
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 892
I'm a big Bernstein fan and although I prefer his earlier investment books, Investor's Manifesto isn't bad and covers the post 2008 recession. The recession was actually one of the reasons he cites for writing this book.
__________________

__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2013, 10:38 PM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: NA
Posts: 55
Thanks Kiki, I will put that on my list.
__________________
BigBangWeary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2013, 09:08 PM   #4
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 15
The Intelligent Investor, Security Analysis, The Millionaire Fastlane, The Single Best Investment

These are all great books.
__________________
SunGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2013, 10:31 PM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nash031's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Coronado
Posts: 1,486
Yes, if you can get a copy of The Intelligent Investor with updated info (inferring what Graham would say now)... that's my go to manual.
__________________
nash031 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2013, 08:55 AM   #6
Full time employment: Posting here.
Koogie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: GTA
Posts: 852
This one is slightly more personal finance than investing but it might appeal to others interested in summer reading...
The Wealthy Barber Returns: Amazon.ca: David Chilton: Books

Believe it or not, his original book was one of the best selling books of all time in Canada (yes, a personal finance book was one of the best selling books of all time in Canada !)
He is also featured on Dragons Den now (the CDN version. Inspired from the UK version. Now the Canadians have started a version in the US called Shark Tank).

He's a good author and a very personable guy. Mind you, you must appreciate Canadian humour... as evidenced by his personal bio:
"""About the Author
David Chilton is an economics graduate from Wilfrid Laurier University. In 1985, he won the award for the highest mark in the country on the Canadian Securities Course. Cheating was never proven but widely suspected. In 1989, he released The Wealthy Barber. It went on to sell an astonishing two million copies in Canada. After milking his one and only good idea for years, Dave left the personal-finance field to home-school his children. His daughter escaped after a few months, but his son served out his entire sentence of three years less a day. Both children somehow overcame the experience and are now attending university. Over the years, Dave also published the bestselling cookbooks Looneyspoons, Crazy Plates and Eat, Shrink & Be Merry! along with authors Janet and Greta Podleski. Adding no value but taking a third of the profits, guilt finally overwhelmed Dave and he left the sistersí business in 2007. They just recently noticed. His true professional passion, however, remains the field of personal finance, where he tries to mix humour and common sense to help people handle their money more wisely. A frequent guest on national TV and radio shows, and a much sought-after speaker, Dave lives just outside Waterloo, Ontario."""
"""P.S. Yes, I know The Wealthy Barber Returns isnít the most creative title. My daughter asked, ďWhatís next, Dad? The Wealthy Barber Goes to Hawaii? Itís like the old Gidget series.Ē ......I closed her RESP."""
__________________
"No one's interested in something you didn't do"
Tragically Hip - Wheat Kings
Koogie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 11:55 AM   #7
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 108
Agreed with the comments about Bernstein, this is really the best author imho.

Maybe something about asset allocation strategy (since you refer to 'classic' books, you already read about passive investing, and might be willing to go one step further?). I learned a lot from Rick Ferri's book in this respect (All About Asset Allocation), but the numerous typos are a bit annoying, and a few assertions are not substantiated. I expect that the corresponding book from Bernstein (The Intelligent Asset Allocator) is more rigorously written.
__________________
siamond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 12:27 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Onward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,667
Wealthy Barber is one of the very best personal finance books, IMO. It might even be THE best.

But it's a terrible title, and I can see people's interest die when I recommend the book and then give them the title.

Haven't read the sequel, but it's on my list.

What's it going to take to get this guy to give his books appealing names?
__________________
And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know.
Onward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 12:31 PM   #9
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Morton
Posts: 56
I agree with the Investor's Manifesto by Dr. Bernstein.
__________________
Brooks Saddle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 08:18 PM   #10
Full time employment: Posting here.
arebelspy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onward View Post
Wealthy Barber is one of the very best personal finance books, IMO. It might even be THE best.

But it's a terrible title, and I can see people's interest die when I recommend the book and then give them the title.

Haven't read the sequel, but it's on my list.

What's it going to take to get this guy to give his books appealing names?
I enjoyed the original quite a bit, but felt the sequel was very disorganized - he was just rambling and jumping between topics frequently. For someone who already was familiar with the topics, it was fine. I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner, unlike the original (which I would).
__________________
arebelspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 10:01 AM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,976
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiki View Post
I'm a big Bernstein fan and although I prefer his earlier investment books, Investor's Manifesto isn't bad and covers the post 2008 recession. The recession was actually one of the reasons he cites for writing this book.
And the 2010 second edition of The Four Pillars of Investing by Bernstein includes a "Postscript on the Economic Collapse." Still my #1 investing book, YMMV.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 05:58 PM   #12
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
And the 2010 second edition of The Four Pillars of Investing by Bernstein includes a "Postscript on the Economic Collapse." Still my #1 investing book, YMMV.
I was lucky enough to have Bernstein sign my copy of Four Pillars when he was in town for a book tour. This is also my favorite investing book.

I didn't realize he updated Four Pillars with a postscript of the latest crash. I'll have to find a copy to read his summary.

Thanks!
__________________
Eat, Drink and Be Merry.
tulak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 05:26 PM   #13
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: NA
Posts: 55
Oh nice Kiki, an autographed version! I actually have read the Intelligent Investor (excellent) and the Wealthy Barber (as I am originally from Canada). I actually did not enjoy the Wealthy Barber Returns and also found it disjointed. Thanks for all of the suggestions though! So far this summer I am through Never Eat Alone and the latest What Colour is Your Parachute. More career oriented, but still good reads when it comes to FIRE. Cheers all!
__________________
BigBangWeary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 06:16 PM   #14
Moderator
MBAustin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 4,158
I just saw this book mentioned very positively on Vanguard's website
The Missing Semester

The authors' premise is that personal finance is the course that isn't taught in high school or college but should be.

Haven't read it but thought it might be of interest to the OP and others.
__________________
"One of the funny things about the stock market is that every time one person buys, another sells, and both think they are astute." William Feather
----------------------------------
ER'd Oct. 2010 at 53. Life is good.
MBAustin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 05:56 PM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 103
Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder: Nassim Nicholas Taleb: 9781400067824: Amazon.com: Books

Currently reading Antifragile by Taleb. It's a very long read, and not completely related to personal finance, but very interesting nonetheless. Taleb is quite a contrarian.
__________________

__________________
segfault is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:32 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.