Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-27-2016, 12:45 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 14,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Hitter View Post
Harvey Mudd
Kinda expensive without getting some help...

https://www.hmc.edu/admission/afford...of-attendance/


More expensive than Rice...

Cost - Student Financial Services - Rice University
__________________

Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-27-2016, 12:56 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Big_Hitter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: In the fairway
Posts: 4,615
DW went to Rice.

Good school.
__________________

__________________
Swing hard, look up
Big_Hitter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2016, 06:12 PM   #23
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post

I may be a little biased, as my own school... (some 62 years ago) is still the number one rated liberal arts college in the U.S.
Well, my school was ranked #7 in most attractive guys (and I'm pretty sure we've dropped a few places in the past 35 years). So at least I've got that going for me.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2016, 07:10 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 3,142
Re the issue of graduate school in a number of fields a masters is really the entry level degree not a bachelors. One example except in times of severe shortage is petroleum engineering. (20 years ago I would have discouraged Americans from studying this, but times have changed and the issue of how to maximize over the long term production from shale fields will require a lot of Petroleum Engineering work)
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2016, 09:34 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
sengsational's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 4,650
My advice to the OP would be to ignore all to do with grad school because I think that if you decide to go to grad school, it should be somewhere else anyway, to broaden one's perspective. Besides, the financial picture for grad school is different since parents are no longer compelled to supply funds.
sengsational is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2016, 12:10 AM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,868
I know personally Cal Poly SLO, it's where I went to Engineering (BS Metallurgical Eng). Still a predominantly smaller college town, although not like 30 years ago when i was there. Great school with a lot of hands on learning, and always rated near top of all public universities. Also very hard to get into as incoming freshman or even junior college transfer. So get good grades and do well on your SAT. That's really all a school has to establish the admissions cutoff.

I 100% agree with the comments that the quality or rating of the college is just to get you that first job out of school. After that it becomes what have you done and what skills you developed that make you more wanted for the next company. Yes, the grades and school still have a small factor, but it becomes less as years go along.

I also would recommend the thought that BS is not where you stop. Consider graduate school to get your MS or PhD. In future the extra levels will benefit you.

At 14 it is good you know you want to be engineering, but you still have 3 years before time to get serious about a school choice and the applications process.
__________________
If you're buying smart water for $4, it's not working

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/17 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2016, 08:07 AM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 393
Look at college/degree as an investment. Does it make sense to attend a university that costs $50k/year to obtain a degree and work as a social worker making $13/hr. People wonder why they have student loans for 30 years.
ponyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2016, 08:24 AM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
jjquantz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 898
Despite being a former high school physics teacher who saw lots of students go into engineering and the sciences, I won't give you specific advice about schools - the folks above are doing a good job of that. I would simply remind you that there are lots of good choices available to you and that you should never feel like you need to make the "right" choice. Gather your information and weigh the pros and cons and you will probably find that you have several good choices. Then make a decision and enjoy your college years.

You and your family will stay a lot more sane if you can avoid framing the decision as "right" or "wrong". There will be many good choices - it will be impossible to tell from the limited data which is "best". So find something that looks good and feels comfortable.

A lot like ER in some ways.
jjquantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2016, 07:49 PM   #29
Full time employment: Posting here.
Taxman59's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 536
I told my sons to visit every campus they could. Look at the relationship between the school and the community. Is the campus huge in a small town (VA Tech), is the campus buried in a large city (Case Western)? I suggested that they look at the type of school and what it offers, the community and what it offers, then look at the degrees. This will help them match the environment with their personality.
Taxman59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 11:51 AM   #30
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Konohrik View Post
I am only 14 years old so I still have quite a bit of time to decide on them but I thought that I could start out by asking people that have more experience than me.

I live in southern California and I am looking for good engineering colleges with a medium+ reputation. Economy isn't a concern at this point in life and I can do research on that later.
Heh. It's been nearly eight years since I posted about our progeny's college search here:
The college tour redux

Today, as an alumnus of the U.S. Naval Academy, I strongly recommend that you study engineering at Rice University. It's on a number of top-ten lists with a few #1s and #2s.

Regardless of which university you choose, if you're at all curious about the military then I strongly recommend signing up for Air Force or Navy ROTC. The first year is totally free of any payback obligation, and all of your tuition/fees are paid to the university at their full retail rate. (You're still paying for your own room/board.) This means the university knows they'll get full price from the U.S. government for your attendance, and that gives you the bonus option of applying early decision. While ED removes all of your negotiating power for financial assistance (which you don't have to care about if you're on ROTC scholarship), ED also gives you a few extra bonus points with the Admissions committee.

In addition, at most universities the ROTC unit gets early registration (to make sure you can sign up for your required ROTC classes without conflicts). The unit's upperclass are a wealth of mentoring info on majors, professors, and other campus details. (There may also be file cabinets of class notes and sample exams.) You'll get plenty of free study assistance from the unit to keep you from wandering too far off the academic path.

You might think that the early mornings of fresh air & exercise are a drawback, but it had the opposite effect on our offspring. Her classmates knew that she had to get up early most weekday mornings, so they'd party elsewhere in the evenings and keep it quiet around her room. There was also zero peer pressure to do drugs or underage drinking because they knew it'd jeopardize her scholarship. You'll have to decide whether that's a bonus or a drawback.

If you stick with ROTC after the first year, then at graduation you'll owe five years of active duty (plus three years of annual e-mail musters in the inactive Reserve). The good news is that by the time you start your sophomore year you'll have no doubts about whether you want to stay in the program or get out and find your own college funding.

Our daughter took great comfort in knowing that she had interesting summer internships (good pay and great sea stories) with a guaranteed job waiting for her at graduation. (Boy, was that job ever waiting for her.) But she's learned a lot and it's where she met her spouse.

Of course if you're the kind of wild-eyed hard-partyin' happy-go-lucky seat-of-the-pants devil-may-care teen who'd benefit from a highly structured environment with lots of discipline and other liberty restrictions, then a service academy is a great place to be from. Or so I've been told. In that case I'd recommend USNA or USAFA or USCGA. West Point... well... visit there in February before making your choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
I'm in full agreement with you about great education at the service academies but there is no way that I'd call the commitment you take on at graduation to be "absolutely free".
I heard that it was a $250K education shoved up your assets one nickel at a time...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 12:15 PM   #31
Moderator Emeritus
laurence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 5,244
You are getting great advice here, I'll mention something else though - don't fall in love with any particular school, and don't be disappointed if you don't get it. My wife has a much younger sister who is like a daughter to me. Straight A's through high school, honor society, honors/AP classes, class president, spoke at graduation, sports, volunteer work - the whole deal. We live in SoCal and she applied to a bunch of UC schools. The best she got was wait listed at UCLA. She probably would have been accepted Spring semester but was really disappointed with this outcome. She had a good offer from University of Arizona and San Diego State, and ended up going to San Diego. She kept her hardworking go-go at 'em attitude, joined all the honor societies and became a VP of her sorority (mixed feelings about that) graduated with honors, and landed a great internship/research fellowship up in the Bay Area and is applying to PhD programs up there, with solid letters of recommendation/endorsements/connections. She did an exchange program to Germany and has been to just about every European country, her best friend speaks three languages, she has seen and done so much and doesn't turn 23 for another month.

Point is, don't think that because that first option didn't work out that you won't have an amazing college experience. Just about every solid university provides ample opportunity to get that awesome college experience and education. And when it's all said and done, I got my BS from the worst (i.e. least prestigious) Cal State and still did all right, career-wise. Only a third of Americans have even completed a Bachelor's degree! Just...don't...don't get a silly degree, my underemployed friends have degrees in fine art, music of the Andes, etc....
laurence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 12:19 PM   #32
Moderator Emeritus
laurence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 5,244
Edit: Pic of the happy grad.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg MeagGraduation.jpg (81.8 KB, 17 views)
laurence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 01:59 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florence, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 2,916
I remember all the young men from our public high school that started into college as engineering students. After one semester, they were business management majors. They just didn't have the strong math and science skills to be successful.

My big city state university was reflective of the same experience. They didn't graduate 100's of engineering students every semester. They were lucky to have graduates in the dozens. And even then, the graduating students had strange names from India and Taiwan--few Americans.

My best friend is very bright, and he went to a small Southern liberal arts college with 97% of graduates going on to higher education. Then he went to the Wharton School of Business for an MBA in Finance. The running joke was all the undergraduates at Penn shelling out mega money for their Ivy League B.S. degrees--but they never laid eyes on the famous faculty members teaching in Graduate School. But it was the masses of undergraduate students' parents picking up the tab.

I'm just fortunate to have graduated in kinder, cheaper times. My tuition started out at $117.50 per semester and rose to $192.50 in four years. Southern universities in state are more like $4,500 per semester tuition. It sure beats $22K per semester tuition my niece's daughter's paying in New York City for a major that'll never maker her a living.
Bamaman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 02:43 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,972
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy View Post
Look at college/degree as an investment. Does it make sense to attend a university that costs $50k/year to obtain a degree and work as a social worker making $13/hr. People wonder why they have student loans for 30 years.
I think this advice and picking a major you enjoy, can excel in, can actually get a job in and allows you to be financially self sufficient for the lifestyle you aspire to is the 80/20. Also check out the graduation rates after 4 years and stress levels of the students. Some of the very competitive schools have pretty high depression rates due to stress and overwork and some schools for various reasons have really low graduation rates.
__________________
Even clouds seem bright and breezy, 'Cause the livin' is free and easy, See the rat race in a new way, Like you're wakin' up to a new day (Dr. Tarr and Professor Fether lyrics, Alan Parsons Project, based on an EA Poe story)
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2017, 11:37 PM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
Urchina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 899
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanoSour View Post
Don't rule out the expensive private schools such as Harvey Mudd. I'm need deep into this process with HS senior and at this point the most expensive private is looking like the least expensive option. I wouldn't have guessed that six months ago.
Yes, this. DH went to MIT, only worked summers and had no student debt when he graduated with his BS. They have an enormous endowment. So don't rule out the top schools based on cost.

When choosing a school, choose one that's good at engineering AND at least something else that interests you. That way, if you change your mind while in school, you'll be able to change majors or minors into another quality program (just ask me how I know this....).

Cal Poly SLO is a great school and a GREAT town - it should def be on your list of potentials.

Have fun!
Urchina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2017, 11:46 PM   #36
Full time employment: Posting here.
Urchina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 899
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrayHare View Post
It's rarely discussed in the brochures but your college experience is based not only on a school's facilities, degree programs, and professors, but also your fellow students. During college years you will learn as much from your fellow students, both the good and the bad, as you learn in classrooms. To see how typical students think you need to spend time on campus, some schools will let you stay overnight in student housing. Plus find some recent alums to talk to, such as previous grads from your high school.
Oh yes, this too. I turned down a full ride scholarship to a private East Coast school because during the weekend I spent there (they flew me out) the people I met were. .. not the sort of people I wanted to spend 4 years with (for example, nobody would talk about finances with me - turns out that there were so many trust fund babies that work was considered shameful). So not my style. I went to a state school, on scholarship, instead. Lots of workin' people there, so I fit right in.
Urchina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2017, 07:37 AM   #37
Recycles dryer sheets
ugeauxgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Rural Alabama
Posts: 420
I am on the hiring team for my company and I did a few interviews this week. I am not in a STEM industry, so this may not be true in your field, but in mine, what college you went to only matters for the first job you apply for- after that, it matters how you did at your previous jobs.

One thing that is important is to get some sort of job experience even if its not in your field. Your interviewer will want to know how you deal with problems, and people etc. An interviewer really does not want to hear about how you handled your "group project" in college- do something that gives you something to say in an interview (probably not flipping burgers). Good luck!
__________________
Projected retirement--2020 at age 48
ugeauxgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2017, 12:21 PM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Milton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigmac3030 View Post
The military is not for everyone
So true. Not that naval or military service is a bad thing, but (like every other occupation or activity) it doesn't suit all personalities. I find that people who have actually served understand this better than most civilians.
__________________
"To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive". Robert Louis Stevenson, An Inland Voyage (1878)
Milton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2017, 12:27 PM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Milton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by ugeauxgirl View Post
[W]hat college you went to only matters for the first job you apply for - after that, it matters how you did at your previous jobs.
I agree. Any student or young graduate who thinks that a golden career is essentially guaranteed by their possession of a degree from X Unviersity is kidding themselves.
__________________
"To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive". Robert Louis Stevenson, An Inland Voyage (1878)
Milton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2017, 09:56 AM   #40
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 14
good read. My son is 2.5 and we're already thinking about college.

My thought has always been: if he's a smart and passionate student who really wants to study (insert STEM major here) and the best program is at Stanford; we will find a way to afford Stanford.

If he is an average student who really isnt sure what he is going to major in and is probably going to spend too much time drinking then he's going in state.

While I want to give my child the best chance of success, I cant see paying an extra $100k (probably $500k by the time he is 18) just so he can go to an expensive private school and drink there.
__________________

injera is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I Need Help Deciding RASAP FIRE and Money 3 03-13-2016 11:06 AM
Help deciding Bond Allocation SoReady FIRE and Money 21 01-21-2014 02:27 PM
Gas Grills - need help deciding! DeborahB Other topics 66 08-27-2010 06:52 PM
Honors Colleges Leonidas Other topics 14 09-14-2006 08:45 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:09 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.