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View Poll Results: Minimum time retired to not feel cheated
If I'm out one day it will be enough 14 5.53%
1 year minimum 10 3.95%
5 years 5 1.98%
10 years 25 9.88%
20 years 118 46.64%
30 years or more 62 24.51%
Other 19 7.51%
Voters: 253. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-20-2019, 01:13 PM   #21
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I don't believe life is fair, so I don't feel any sense of expectation that I'll "get to have" a certain amount of retirement because I worked and saved for 35 years, and I won't feel ripped off if my retirement lasts only a few years.

I've been so full of gratitude for the 15 months of semi-retirement that I already feel like I've "won" .

If I get even 3-4 full years of retirement, I'll feel like the luckiest person on the planet (and my heirs will be really lucky, too ).
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:22 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PointBreeze View Post
I don't believe life is fair, so I don't feel any sense of expectation that I'll "get to have" a certain amount of retirement because I worked and saved for 35 years, and I won't feel ripped off if my retirement lasts only a few years.

I've been so full of gratitude for the 15 months of semi-retirement that I already feel like I've "won" .

If I get even 3-4 full years of retirement, I'll feel like the luckiest person on the planet (and my heirs will be really lucky, too ).
Reminds me of an old, crusty mentor I had years ago. He said the ultimate goal (in staying in the military for at least 20 years) was to be able to cash your first retirement check.

I call my retirement pension "wake up pay"; if I wake up on the 1st of the month...then BOOM! I get paid!
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:59 AM   #23
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I was about to click "one day out..." because of the positive feeling on ERing but then I thought more about an ROI perspective. I ultimately chose 20 years and was not surprised to see that was the mode. I am 14 years in: "so far, so good," said the jumper as he passed the 50th floor.
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Old 02-21-2019, 08:07 AM   #24
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Twenty would be great. As others noted by others, once you hit the 80's, the toll of time on the body limits what most people can do. I have an aunt and uncle who are in their mid 80's. Both were very active adults. He can no longer play golf which he loved, and she is struggling with dementia. They sit all day long watching either Fox News or the Golf Channel.
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:31 AM   #25
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Even though I whine about work, we've been pretty fortunate with our jobs providing us with enough resources (time off and salary) to have fun during pre-retirement. So any time in retirement really would be icing on the cake.

However, I chose 30 year because I've been saving for a comfortable retirement starting at 50 and hope to last to at least 90 with at least 30 good years. Dad and a few relatives died early due poor lifestyle choices (smoking, alcohol). But mom is almost 80, looks great and is so mobile and mentally on the ball. Other aunts, uncles, and grandparents have made it to their late 90's and early 100's but slowed down physically and mentally once they hit their 90's.
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:35 AM   #26
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I have two friends who each died at age 55. (I really miss them).

One was thinking about retirement, but had just recently gotten a job he loved (after being unhappy at work for many years). He died unexpectedly in his sleep during a visit to family. Never woke up.

The other was able to retire at age 50, so she did. A kind and gentle person, she had mental health issues, complicated (after retirement) by her husband's unspeakable act of shooting himself to death in front of her. She loved her family and pets, but, she suffered greatly during retirement.

Honestly? I think Friend No. 1 was the lucky one. The future was finally looking great, and he never suffered.
That's the way I feel and many others around me. The way to go is with no suffering.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:10 PM   #27
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I retired so young that Iíve never felt cheated.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:26 PM   #28
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Planning to retire at 62, and hoping to live(thrive) a minimum of 20 years afterwards. By our mid 80s, most of us are slowly falling apart, and are unable to be active very much.

25 years would be ideal.
My father retired at 62. He is now 87 and he and my mother enjoyed at least the first 20 of those years. The past 2 years saw my mother age greatly and pass. My father, who lives in New England is currently in Florida at a time share. He got there on New Year's and plans to stay until the end of March. I can see that physically, this is getting tough for him. But he has enough money left at 87 to pay someone to come in for a few hours each day and help him out.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:26 PM   #29
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Of course, I want to live a long life, but actually, the shorter the period (assuming you retired early), the more valuable the sacrifice would have been. For example, if I retired at 55 and died at 56, then that year was way worth any sacrifice I would have made to retire early. The alternative would have been to never have retired and to die at 56 - working until I died. Bottom line is that it was worth any sacrifice the minute. No matter how long it is, it was great to know the feeling of freedom. I went to school like most people and started working when I was 16. I also worked my way through college and worked in my profession as I obtained my masters degree. So, for basically my entire life, I had a commitment. Stepping away from that was fantastic.
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Old 02-21-2019, 01:04 PM   #30
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My calculus was simple. About 25 years to grow up, get educated, and find a good job. Then about 25 years on that job. Finally even things out with about 25 years of retirement. Anything additional will be gravy.
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Old 02-21-2019, 01:21 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Jerry1 View Post
Of course, I want to live a long life, but actually, the shorter the period (assuming you retired early), the more valuable the sacrifice would have been. For example, if I retired at 55 and died at 56, then that year was way worth any sacrifice I would have made to retire early. The alternative would have been to never have retired and to die at 56 - working until I died. Bottom line is that it was worth any sacrifice the minute. No matter how long it is, it was great to know the feeling of freedom. I went to school like most people and started working when I was 16. I also worked my way through college and worked in my profession as I obtained my masters degree. So, for basically my entire life, I had a commitment. Stepping away from that was fantastic.
Yes, exactly! If you die young, you are extra grateful that you retired before expiring!
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Old 02-21-2019, 02:04 PM   #32
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I've known other people who retired after a long career but were cut down within a year. If I could contact them by Ouija board, I wonder if some would say something like "My retirement was so short I barely felt it. If I had known I was only gonna live six months, I wouldn't have bothered retiring. I'd rather have died in harness so my widow would have collected more life insurance."
If I knew I was only going to live six months longer I would have regretted not retiring earlier. No regrets about saving for retirement.

I voted 30+ years, but in the sense that I want that, not that saving would have been a waste if I didn't last that long.
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Old 02-21-2019, 02:13 PM   #33
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I'm still working, and it seems like the more I think about retirement the more I realize I kind of like working. I'm just not really happy in my current job. If I had it to do all over again, I would choose a more fulfilling career. Something that I feel actually helps people.

So to answer the question, I would only feel cheated if I didn't get to experience retirement at all.
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Old 02-21-2019, 02:29 PM   #34
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My calculus was simple. About 25 years to grow up, get educated, and find a good job. Then about 25 years on that job. Finally even things out with about 25 years of retirement. Anything additional will be gravy.

I like that "rule of equal thirds", but couldn't manage to do it quite as quickly. Finished school at 27.5, retired at 55, so I guess my target date to finish out the last third is 82.5.
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Old 02-24-2019, 09:42 AM   #35
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My ultimate goal is 33 years of retirement which will match how many years I worked. I left just before my 54th B-day so I have to make it to almost 87.

My realistic goal is 20 great years (to age 74), followed by another 6-10 "good" years.
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Old 02-25-2019, 10:03 AM   #36
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My goal is to collect as many checks in retirement as I did working. That will put me into my 90ís. Of course, I want those to be years that I remain in good health both physically and mentally. If that isnít going to happen then less is fine. I wonít feel cheated as long as I enjoy retirement. Each day is great.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:36 PM   #37
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I chose 20 years but I did not retire until age 62 so that would take me to 82. I have no interest in living to 90 although I've planned financially to age 95. My professional "career" was for 32 years but I've worked or gone to college or both since a teenager. So I consider 40 years working and 20 in retirement to be reasonable and a good contribution to society.

Several of my friends died in their early 60's either a few years after retiring or before retiring. As I neared retirement, I was worried that I might become one of them - could see myself developing some terminal illness just before I made it to the goal. They had good government pensions and no survivors so the taxpayers benefited.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:53 PM   #38
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I voted for 20 and I'm already 1/3 of the way there... I'm really not sure I'll make it at this rate so I'm going to revisit the blow your dough thread for new ideas.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:59 PM   #39
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I don't really feel cheated, because I'm the one who decided when I could or should retire. I could have retired half a century ago with no health care and no income, and lived in a refrigerator box under a bridge, subsisting on berries and catchable critters, but I decided that I would prefer to wait and have a shorter retirement. ("Good thinking, W2R!" )

So, I voted "other".

I would feel cheated if I died before about age 88-90, but that's another matter and one that is beyond my control.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:17 PM   #40
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I don't feel "cheated" at any number. The universe doesn't owe me anything.

I may feel that, with 20/20 hindsight, I should have retired sooner or spent more money while I was working. But, I don't have 20/20 foresight. I think I made a decent decision based on the facts I had at the time.

I do think that saving more allowed me to retire at 59 instead of working till 65. So my payoff for saving came at the front of my retirement, not the back. I got those 6 years, so I feel that decision (the decision to save more than some other people would) worked out fine for me.

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Yes, exactly! If you die young, you are extra grateful that you retired before expiring!
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