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Old 04-09-2014, 02:27 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Refresher View Post
I speaking of a couple with $20,000 MAGI and has a US address.
In non Medicaid states the exchange will provide a subsidy for that income that will make the monthly premium $0.
This is not true. If you live in a state that hasn't signed on to the Medicaid expansion you don't get subsidies - you have no coverage:

"The ACA envisioned people below 138% of poverty receiving Medicaid and thus does not provide premium tax credits for the lowest income. As a result, individuals below poverty are not eligible for Marketplace tax credits, even if Medicaid coverage is not available to them. Individuals with incomes above 100% of poverty in states that do not expand may be eligible to purchase subsidized coverage through the Marketplaces; however, only about a third of uninsured adults (3 million people) who could have been eligible for Medicaid if their state expanded fall into this income range. Thus, there will be a large gap in coverage for adults in states that do not expand Medicaid (Figure 3)."

This is from this report by Kaiser:

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
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Old 04-09-2014, 04:33 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by kevink View Post
This is not true. If you live in a state that hasn't signed on to the Medicaid expansion you don't get subsidies - you have no coverage:

"The ACA envisioned people below 138% of poverty receiving Medicaid and thus does not provide premium tax credits for the lowest income. As a result, individuals below poverty are not eligible for Marketplace tax credits, even if Medicaid coverage is not available to them. Individuals with incomes above 100% of poverty in states that do not expand may be eligible to purchase subsidized coverage through the Marketplaces; however, only about a third of uninsured adults (3 million people) who could have been eligible for Medicaid if their state expanded fall into this income range. Thus, there will be a large gap in coverage for adults in states that do not expand Medicaid (Figure 3)."

This is from this report by Kaiser:

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
MAGI of $20,000 for 2 is above 100% of poverty level and entitles the couple to buy a plan with subsidies if the state does not expand Medicaid.
I am getting that MAGI from the link Caffeinated Calm attached to the previous post.
With these subsidies plans are available for $0 per month.
Healthcare.gov has quite a few plans available for $0.
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Old 04-09-2014, 10:43 PM   #23
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Hi Kevin,

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Kramer has done all of this stuff the right way and is someone whose posts about expat life are all worth reading closely, by the way. I've learned and continue to learn a lot from him.
Thanks for your kind words. I read your linked articles, very helpful!

You mentioned that you are not spending over 35 days per year in the USA so as to qualify for the "expat exemption" for the ACA. May I ask, is that because you are in Mexico on a tourist visa? I know Mexico is very generous to Americans on a tourist visa and allows 180 day stays upon entry and easy to renew with border runs.

My position is that I am a "bona-fide resident" of the Philippines and that I can spend more than 35 days per year in the USA. I go to the USA to visit friends and family and probably spend an average of 6 to 7 weeks per year there. But I have a resident visa in the Philippines. I have no residence in the USA. And all my stuff and nexus of existence is in the Philippines. I am strictly a tourist in the USA. As near as I can tell, I am a "permanent resident" of the Philippines and the Philippines is my "tax home" even though I don't pay them any taxes (except on my local bank interest) because I have no earned income. The "tax home" part seems to apply to people who are, say, living in Tijuana and commuting daily to work in San Diego, their tax home is San Diego. "Bona-Fide residence" also requires completion of at least a full tax year as a resident of a place.

If I were living here in the Philippines on a tourist visa (which is probably easier to do than even in Mexico), then I think I would have to tow the line on the maximum 35 days in the USA. Same goes if I maintained an actual home in the USA.

Also, do you guys ask to get your passport stamped out of the USA? I have never gotten an exit stamp from the USA and I don't know if they are even available? I am asking because I will be taking a short trip to Mexico City during my USA trip this year -- with proper precautions my USA time might be exactly 35 days.
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Old 04-10-2014, 01:51 PM   #24
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Hi Kevin,

Thanks for your kind words. I read your linked articles, very helpful!

You mentioned that you are not spending over 35 days per year in the USA so as to qualify for the "expat exemption" for the ACA. May I ask, is that because you are in Mexico on a tourist visa? I know Mexico is very generous to Americans on a tourist visa and allows 180 day stays upon entry and easy to renew with border runs.

My position is that I am a "bona-fide resident" of the Philippines and that I can spend more than 35 days per year in the USA. I go to the USA to visit friends and family and probably spend an average of 6 to 7 weeks per year there. But I have a resident visa in the Philippines. I have no residence in the USA. And all my stuff and nexus of existence is in the Philippines. I am strictly a tourist in the USA. As near as I can tell, I am a "permanent resident" of the Philippines and the Philippines is my "tax home" even though I don't pay them any taxes (except on my local bank interest) because I have no earned income. The "tax home" part seems to apply to people who are, say, living in Tijuana and commuting daily to work in San Diego, their tax home is San Diego. "Bona-Fide residence" also requires completion of at least a full tax year as a resident of a place.

If I were living here in the Philippines on a tourist visa (which is probably easier to do than even in Mexico), then I think I would have to tow the line on the maximum 35 days in the USA. Same goes if I maintained an actual home in the USA.

Also, do you guys ask to get your passport stamped out of the USA? I have never gotten an exit stamp from the USA and I don't know if they are even available? I am asking because I will be taking a short trip to Mexico City during my USA trip this year -- with proper precautions my USA time might be exactly 35 days.
Hi Kramer,

The article in Yucalandia that I provided the link in my blog has this to say about proving expat residence:

ACA – Obamacare’s Effects on American Expats Living Abroad | Surviving Yucatan

From what you tell me, it looks like for you, as for us, the only way you can meet this standard is to not exceed 35 days in the U.S. in a year.

We have long-term Mexico residency visas (temporal and are planning on going permanente). Initially we only did this because you have to have such visas to apply for health insurance here, but now with ACA there's a lot more incentive. Otherwise we would much prefer to just have tourist visas, which as you say are genereous here (180 days). The bad news is they are continuing to raise the income requirements for longer term visas and they have also just banned applying on the basis of assets alone. You have to have a $2600 per month pension or pay for 4 years of temporal before going permanente now.

I don't think we've ever had our passports stamped when leaving the U.S.
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Old 04-10-2014, 02:24 PM   #25
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Ok, so how do you "prove" you have been out of the country for 330+ days? Thanks.
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Old 04-10-2014, 02:30 PM   #26
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Here in Peru 180 day tourist visa's are standard (upon request) and Permanent residency is $1,000.00 a month plus $500.00 for each dependent. You can get HI as a tourist at a private clinic, but must be a resident to get a plan from a major carrier.
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Old 04-10-2014, 04:34 PM   #27
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Ok, so how do you "prove" you have been out of the country for 330+ days? Thanks.
Utility bills, rental contract if renting, property tax bills if you own, entry and exit documents on your expat Visa (México is quite meticulous about this), for starters. Your legal address for IRS purposes must also be foreign, and there are a bunch of other possibilities.
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