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Old 02-06-2013, 05:46 PM   #41
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This is just one more reminder to make sure your beneficiary information is up to date on those Life insurance policies and IRA's. Too many times the money goes to an estranged person.
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Old 02-06-2013, 07:48 PM   #42
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Having a co-worker die is no reason to retire early. Nobody knows when your last day on earth will be. If you enjoy what you are doing at work then I doubt retirement has entered your mind. We can all find excuses to quit work, bad day, terrible boss and I could go on and on. If someone is only 40 in my opinion you have many years left ahead of you to enjoy life. Work is a big part of that life.

I probably quit in my mind 25 years before I did finally hang it up. I waited until I was what normally is excepted as retirement age.

I play golf with a person who is only 50. He plays way to much golf when he should be working. He is now in terrible financial shape and when I ask why he is playing so much golf he tells me his dad died at 69 so he going to enjoy life while he can. Again a bad mistake and terrible excuse not to work.

I guess I grew up in an era if you were young and did not work you were looked down on as lazy. Thats just how I was taught. You people that are only 40 and thinking about retiring early think real hard before you make that move. Good jobs are really hard to find. Bad days at work are also plentiful. I will shut up now. oldtrig
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:21 PM   #43
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Old Trig.... I, for one, certainly believe that your views are very important. The accepted age for retirement is certainly one consideration. I think you really nailed it when you said that "If you enjoy what you are doing at work then I doubt retirement has entered your mind." The opposite is also true. At some point, regardless of age, you know it is time to hang it up. Your golf buddy made his own decision. Whether right or wrong it was his to make, and the consequences are his to live with. We all face those same issues. Re lazy, keep an open mind. Retired doesn't necessarily mean no work. Some folks voulnteer their time. It really is a presonal choice.
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:41 PM   #44
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Right or wrong I "give a cr*p" because the fear of 'living under a bridge eating cat food' is much stronger than my fear of 'being the richest person in the old age home' for me, especially at age 58.
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The fear of running out of money, or even being forced to cut back on my desired or, worse, possible standard of living is a much greater motivator than the possibility of leaving a meaningful estate to my children or my cat.


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I will loosen up in time, ideally I'll die broke.
I doubt if I would. Unless/until I know that I only have a short period of time left, I will keep assuming the best. I never want to be in the position where I have to start a conversation with DW by saying "Honey, our financial plan has worked out just as we planned. All we have to do now is make sure we die in the next three years...."
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:41 PM   #45
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Sorry to hear the news. I saw the obits of two people I served with recently, both 45 or 46. Too young if you ask me!
We seem to be inundated lately with deaths of friends and aquaintances in their early 60s. Last week someone who was to retire at the end of this semester . No longer "too young," but still too soon.
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:16 PM   #46
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Old Trig.... I, for one, certainly believe that your views are very important. The accepted age for retirement is certainly one consideration. I think you really nailed it when you said that "If you enjoy what you are doing at work then I doubt retirement has entered your mind." The opposite is also true. At some point, regardless of age, you know it is time to hang it up. Your golf buddy made his own decision. Whether right or wrong it was his to make, and the consequences are his to live with. We all face those same issues. Re lazy, keep an open mind. Retired doesn't necessarily mean no work. Some folks voulnteer their time. It really is a personal choice.
I was once told that everyone would know when the time is right for retirement. That was definitely a true statement in my case. I had thought about it when I turned 62 but could not make it happen. I was driving down the road in my company truck and it hit me that today was the day. I went straight to personnel and turned in my papers. It was the right move for me because for one I am not getting any younger. I also wanted to spend more time with my 18 month old grandchild. I actually loved my work and really had it made. I also made good money for this area and had a company vehicle to drive home. It just comes a time when all of us make that move. At 40 there would have been no way for me even if I could have afforded to retire. That is just way to young to give up working in my opinion. No way you would know for sure if your money would hold out for say 45 years. At 65 it gets different. My time is much shorter than most 40 year olds even though none of us know when our last day is. I am only posting how I fell about all this. Its real easy to use the excuse that I might not live to enjoy anything to leave work young. Mid 60's is just how I always looked at someone retiring. Look at some of the lottery winners that hit it big at an early age and see how they turned out. Most were not happy after a while. I wish I felt like working again. I would go back working for myself in a minute but I just cannot get going like when I ws 40. I guess it part of getting old. Ok, I am though typing again. Sorry if I hurt anyone's feeling with my rant. oldtrig
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:41 PM   #47
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Old trig, there is nothing wrong with how you feel and your beliefs. Even if I don't agree with a couple of your points, I think you, like me, are the product of your experiences, upbringing, age, and culture. What is right for you is simply right for you. And I appreciate your perspective, even if I may not come to the same conclusions.
Thank you for your ideas.
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:49 PM   #48
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A few years ago the first person in my small high school class died (he was late 30's). The shocking thing was that (1) he committed suicide and (2) of all the people in my graduating class I think he was the person I would suspect least of having problems with depression.
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Old 02-06-2013, 11:21 PM   #49
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Old trig, definitely felt like you about an appropriate retirement age until recently. I work for VeryMegaCorp and absolutely loved me job for 20 years or so until the soulless demons of middle management were allowed to run totally amuck and the last 5 years have become massively less than rewarding. Then I had a sooner than expected mitral valve repair this summer which I truly believe was aggravated and accelerated by the bucketloads of stress dumped on us. The day I left the hospital was the day I decided to RE ASAP.

My DW and I have been the poster children for LBYM. I am so glad. I had planned on working to SS age and am now looking at early 2014 at age 57. It's going to be a little tight, but I think we can make it work. I am pleased to have found this site. Been lurking around awhile and am feeling better about our decision.
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Old 02-06-2013, 11:57 PM   #50
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Old trig, definitely felt like you about an appropriate retirement age until recently. I work for VeryMegaCorp and absolutely loved me job for 20 years or so until the soulless demons of middle management were allowed to run totally amuck and the last 5 years have become massively less than rewarding. Then I had a sooner than expected mitral valve repair this summer which I truly believe was aggravated and accelerated by the bucketloads of stress dumped on us. The day I left the hospital was the day I decided to RE ASAP.

My DW and I have been the poster children for LBYM. I am so glad. I had planned on working to SS age and am now looking at early 2014 at age 57. It's going to be a little tight, but I think we can make it work. I am pleased to have found this site. Been lurking around awhile and am feeling better about our decision.

Same situation as you, except I'm younger. 40 years old and loved my job for 15 years and new management took over 2 years old and now it's a living hell. So bad that I now have to take 2 pills a day to make it through the day and have to see a shrink for my problem from the stress load at work.

I wanted to work another 5 years and that would have given me enough to retire early comfortably. Now I'm just waiting for servance or termination. Could not have imagined this 2 years ago, but it's just not worth going to this everyday and that's when I know it's time to quit.
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Old 02-07-2013, 12:06 AM   #51
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Old trig, there is nothing wrong with how you feel and your beliefs. Even if I don't agree with a couple of your points, I think you, like me, are the product of your experiences, upbringing, age, and culture. What is right for you is simply right for you. And I appreciate your perspective, even if I may not come to the same conclusions.
Thank you for your ideas.
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Old 02-07-2013, 12:12 AM   #52
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I Split @ 55 1/2. Was ready for +3 years. Like others said, loved the w*rk... enjoyed it. Then an a**hole for a boss ruined it. The stories... oh my. In any case, it was no longer fulfilling. So I packed it in when the numbers came together. Had considered that after a year or two off I might be willing to re-enter the w*rkforce. Then I just started loving the freedom so much that NOW if I had to (choke... choke...) go back to w*rk (shudder...) it woud be a terrible thing. We are both so free and happy. No regrets.
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:38 PM   #53
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I honestly don't think I'll live to "old age" and even if I did.. who gives a cr*p. A lot of really old people have a poor quality of life anyway so why plan for it. You want to be the richest person in the old age home? To heck with that.
Perhaps. But quite a few older people (including some in their 90s) remain physically, mentally and socially active and have an excellent quality of life until shortly before death.

Daniel Gilbert ("Stumbling Upon Happiness") says that most people readily adjust to changes (both positive and negative). Except for a short period of adaptation, one's temperament is not significantly affected by the onset of physical disabilities etc.; and indeed, quite a few studies by psychologists / gerontologists (e.g., Derek Isaacowitz) suggests that senior citizens are typically happier than the middle-aged.

P.S. Since I FIRE'd, I've had the opportunity to volunteer in several different publicly-funded long-term care facilities. I've been very impressed with the caring nature of the professional staff. While I agree that it is not much fun being shut up in a nursing home essentially killing time while waiting to die, the perception that such places are miserable hell-holes doesn't have much basis in reality, at least in my limited experience.
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:58 PM   #54
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If someone is only 40 in my opinion you have many years left ahead of you to enjoy life. Work is a big part of that life.

I probably quit in my mind 25 years before I did finally hang it up. I waited until I was what normally is excepted as retirement age.

I play golf with a person who is only 50. He plays way too much golf when he should be working. He is now in terrible financial shape and when I ask why he is playing so much golf he tells me his dad died at 69 so he going to enjoy life while he can. Again a bad mistake and terrible excuse not to work.

I guess I grew up in an era if you were young and did not work you were looked down on as lazy. Thats just how I was taught. You people that are only 40 and thinking about retiring early think real hard before you make that move.
You are fully entitled to your opinion; but you do realize that this is the "early" retirement forum, right?

I can't agree with the suggestion that someone who chooses not to work is ipso facto lazy, unfulfilled or financially reckless. As AWeinel noted, many early retirees do a lot of unpaid community support 'work'. If one is financially independent, paid employment is entirely optional.

Further, an argument could be made that someone who continues to hold a job they don't need is simply taking an opportunity away from another person who really needs it (as you correctly point out, jobs are scarce). That's especially true where the incumbent has 'retired in place'.

Within the bounds of legality and fiscal reality, everyone should do what seems right to him or her. Let's try not to judge or criticize other's decisions.
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Old 02-12-2013, 06:09 PM   #55
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A few years ago the first person in my small high school class died (he was late 30's). The shocking thing was that (1) he committed suicide and (2) of all the people in my graduating class I think he was the person I would suspect least of having problems with depression.
As illustrated in Robinson's famous poem "Richard Cory" (1897), one never knows.
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:02 PM   #56
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I went in for a check up and was diagnosed with a mental disorder related to work. Now I'm on 2 different pills.

Just received the result of my blood work and I have red blood cell problem, anemic, not enough iron. I have hypertension also and considered obsese at 26% body fat.

What does this mean? It means I haven't been taking care of myself. I have turned into the co-workers that I used to see and go "What the hell is wrong with these people? How did they let themself go like this" When I was in my 20's and early 30's, I would go to the gym 5 times a week and had a strict low fat diet. Now I'm so tired when I get home that I just drink to get myself to stop thinking of work...that's when I know I need to consider plan B.

Checked out my pension benefit and if I took early pension at age 55(in about 15 more years), I am entitled to $1,800 a month until I reach age 62, at that point, I would only get $100 a month since I elected to take early pension. Check SS and if it still exist as of today, I would get $1,700 a month if I apply for early SS at age 62.

If only I had invested in Apple stock when it was at $10 instead of ETOY or ATHOME .
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:05 PM   #57
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I went in for a check up and was diagnosed with a mental disorder related to work. Now I'm on 2 different pills. Just received the result of my blood work and I have red blood cell problem, anemic, not enough iron. I have hypertension also and considered obsese at 26% body fat.... I'm so tired when I get home that I just drink to get myself to stop thinking of work...that's when I know I need to consider plan B.
Doesn't sound good! But at least you are aware of the situation and can start making changes. And as you previously followed a good diet and exercise routine, presumably it will be easier for you to resume it than it would be for a longstanding couch potato to revise lifelong habits.

If I may suggest without being patronizing: it's probably more productive for you to focus on your lifestyle changes (which are directly within your control, and should yield significant results relatively quickly) than thinking about FIRE (particularly when it comes to looking in the rear view mirror at missed opportunities). This is meant from the heart.

Good luck, and keep your chin up.
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:21 AM   #58
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A death at work finally got me serious about my retirement planning. He was mid 50's and just didn't show up for work one day. Got the news later that he had a heart attack.

It can hit early. Coworker's brother expired at 35 from sudden cardiac death. No artery problems. Just doing what he always did, lift weights and run on the treadmill. Carpe diem and get your stuff in order -- just in case.

Anyway, I lurked here for many years off and on when some search landed me here. After my coworker's death last year, I joined and started participating. More importantly, I did the planning with firecalc and other planners to realize that ER was not only possible for me, but smart.

DW and I probably would have worked until 65 because "that's what you do." We have no kids and would have had too much money to spend. We're going to cut it closer now with the benefit of at least 10 years of no work BS -- assuming we live long enough. Hey, you never know.
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Old 02-16-2013, 12:23 PM   #59
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Having a co-worker die is no reason to retire early. Nobody knows when your last day on earth will be. If you enjoy what you are doing at work then I doubt retirement has entered your mind. We can all find excuses to quit work, bad day, terrible boss and I could go on and on. If someone is only 40 in my opinion you have many years left ahead of you to enjoy life. Work is a big part of that life.

I probably quit in my mind 25 years before I did finally hang it up. I waited until I was what normally is excepted as retirement age.

I play golf with a person who is only 50. He plays way to much golf when he should be working. He is now in terrible financial shape and when I ask why he is playing so much golf he tells me his dad died at 69 so he going to enjoy life while he can. Again a bad mistake and terrible excuse not to work.

I guess I grew up in an era if you were young and did not work you were looked down on as lazy. Thats just how I was taught. You people that are only 40 and thinking about retiring early think real hard before you make that move. Good jobs are really hard to find. Bad days at work are also plentiful. I will shut up now. oldtrig
^ All of that are good points.

One thing is this: No one can have someone else live his life. When one gets enough backbone, personally, he goes forward without referring to whether anyone has an opinion of his choice[s].

I don't think there's an ideal. No one is being given a medal for working until he reaches the age to collect full benefits from Social Security.

At the same time, a coworker having died while in his 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s is cause for reflection ... but not an actual retirement. If one is going to let his mind wander there ... ask yourself, "Why ever work?" There are, after all, child deaths. Someone in his 10s. Someone who was still in single digits.

(Enough!)

The thing that doesn't get discussed too often is how retirement impacts an individual. What changes it brings. What it does or does not do to and for the psyche. My 80-year-old father has been retired for 15 years from a job he held for 43 years. He worked some years before that and, when you get down to it, he clocked in 50 years of his life with work. He told me, strange thing, after all this time in retirement he still can have an occasional dream which involves him being present in the work environment. It's weird. Yet it does occur.

We are conditioned to many things. Work is part of it. A big part of it. I am of the opinion that we're overworked and underrewarded in the U.S. And it is closer to the ideal to retire while one is still in his 50s. If you can go sooner ... even better. It's great for a person to be able to retire ... rather than die while still actively in one's work life. To be able to retire "early," in this screwed up period, requires unusual circumstances with an uncommon individual.
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Old 02-16-2013, 02:31 PM   #60
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It's great for a person to be able to retire ... rather than die while still actively in one's work life. To be able to retire "early," in this screwed up period, requires unusual circumstances with an uncommon individual.
What a great straight line, but I'll let it go (instead of taking another uncommon beating)...
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