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Old 07-20-2007, 01:56 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Want2retire View Post
I am not including equity in my (paid off) home, since I do not regard that as an investment so much as a place to live.
Agreed. Although a residence forms part of one's net worth, I don't believe it should be included in one's retirement savings calculations; at least, not unless there is a definite plan to 'downsize' upon retirement.

Others disagree, and they have valid arguments (though I am not persuaded).
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Old 07-20-2007, 02:10 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milton View Post
Agreed. Although a residence forms part of one's net worth, I don't believe it should be included in one's retirement savings calculations; at least, not unless there is a definite plan to 'downsize' upon retirement.

Others disagree, and they have valid arguments (though I am not persuaded).
I think a lot of it depends on your location too. I'd only include it in my NW if it wasn't illiquid. If I was in a warm market where I could count on 3 offers the first month, then I'd think of it like a stable bond asset I suppose.
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Old 07-20-2007, 02:15 PM   #23
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Probably 60% tax deferred.
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Old 07-20-2007, 02:23 PM   #24
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about 65% tax deferred
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Old 07-20-2007, 03:19 PM   #25
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1) You can raise your limit on Jan 1, 2008. $20,500 is this year's limit. My spouse has a November birthday. She raised her limit 11 months before she turned 50.
2) No. They already have your personal data.
Right on all counts. It was $20,500 this year - - $15,500 + $5000 over-50. Guess I was asleep at the wheel when I wrote that! But not when I signed up to have it deducted from my paycheck. (sigh)

I have contributed the maximum allowable amount since 1999 (starting over from scratch at that time, long story). Sure wish the maximum had been this large back then but I am making up for lost time!

Another thing to consider as well as maxing out on the 401K, is simultaneously maxing out on a Roth IRA. The maximum there is just $5000 this year. I started doing that last year (better late than never). I do wish I had started it earlier but at the time, I had such a driving ambition to pay off the house that I had blinders on. Unfortunately, even if I quit work as late as 2010 I probably won't have much in it (you can't add $ to it if you don't have any earned income). So, at that point I'll have a total of maybe $40K in it, depending on the market.

I'll probably just leave it alone, put it in Wellington or something, and let it grow for 20 years. Eventually it might come in handy.
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Old 07-20-2007, 03:31 PM   #26
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about 25% in taxable accts, 75% in tax-deferred. (Not including house in calculations.)

Retired since December, 2006, but not drawing down from these investments for at least five years, once DH retires - currently living on my pension and DH's income.
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Old 07-20-2007, 06:43 PM   #27
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Old 07-20-2007, 06:46 PM   #28
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Old 07-20-2007, 07:21 PM   #29
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Old 07-20-2007, 07:51 PM   #30
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60% taxable & 40% tax deferred.
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Old 07-20-2007, 10:45 PM   #31
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Approx. 30% taxable of which 30% is cash/cash equiv, remainder is mostly equities and a small high yield bond allocation.
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Old 07-21-2007, 08:54 AM   #32
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75% in Taxable, 25% in tax-deferred. Age 30.

Had a bumper year last year and this year-otherwise, would have had much less in taxable and more in tax-d.
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Old 07-22-2007, 05:44 AM   #33
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Old 07-23-2007, 10:35 AM   #34
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60% taxable, 25% qualified (IRA, 401k etc), and 15% non-qualified deferred (which is somewhere in between).
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Old 07-25-2007, 11:34 AM   #35
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I'm about 65 - 70% taxable. My wife doesn't work so I have been the only one contributing to a 401(k) which I have maxed out since I started working full time 8 years ago.

Most of my taxable is in RE LPs and my emergency fund. It's not the most efficient thing tax wise, but I don't have much of a choice. My comp is so heavily tied to the general market that I have to keep a low public equity exposure.
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Old 07-26-2007, 12:52 AM   #36
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25% Taxable not counting the house. The tax deferred stuff is in a some IRAs that were rolled over from employer plans that have continued to grow at a healthy pace. The taxable stuff is a variety including MM, Index funds, about 20 individual stocks, some CDs and some coins in the change jar on my dresser. The long term plan will tip the percentages in the opposite direction over time after we burn through some of the accounts and then start on the deferred pile after age 59.5
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Old 07-26-2007, 07:16 AM   #37
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33% Taxable, 67% Tax-deferred (Roth IRAs for wife and me, and my 401k).
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Old 08-01-2007, 10:39 PM   #38
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Location: East Bay CA/Long Island NY
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28% taxable
72% retirement accts (401k, 403b, rollover IRA, roth IRA, pension)

We're in our early 40 late 30's with 2.5 kids, currently 5 to 10 years away from ER.

Our mix currently is:

6 month of emergency cash in taxable money market funds.
stocks, ETF, various mutual funds through Vanguard (love the "elcheapo" Admiral class shares), real estate

sitting on 20% cash now to wait out the mkt turbulence...normally fully invested.

due to the fact that we've maxed out the contribution limits in our retirement accounts since the get go, our portfolio is skewed to the retirement side.
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