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What % of your liquid is in taxable acct?
Old 07-19-2007, 06:55 PM   #1
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What % of your liquid is in taxable acct?

Just curious...my liquid is about 60% tax defered (401k, IRA, small stock grant and deferred comp) the other 40% is taxable (mostly vanguard funds, and 6 or 7 stocks). 37 years old...was wondering how other's stock, bond, fund, cash holdings are broken down...Thx
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Old 07-19-2007, 07:01 PM   #2
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About 50% taxable which holds no bonds. The small amount of taxable cash is in a tax-exempt money market fund. With 25% fixed income overall, that means half of the tax-deferred is fixed income.
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Old 07-19-2007, 08:51 PM   #3
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I am about 66% in taxable accounts right now. Mainly due to being a contractor most of last year, so I had money to throw around, but wasn't eligible for a retirement plan for a while.
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Old 07-19-2007, 08:54 PM   #4
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13% taxable, 87% IRA
100% equities (individual stocks)
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Old 07-19-2007, 08:58 PM   #5
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15-20% in taxable...in dividend paying stocks...no bonds...just started bulking it up over the last 3 years...
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Old 07-20-2007, 07:21 AM   #6
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About 35% taxable. Was overwhelmingly in equities, but I have sold a bunch of stuff and am sitting on an unusually large pile of cash. Right now, taxable account is roughly 25% cash & CDs, 75% equities and options.
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Old 07-20-2007, 07:57 AM   #7
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Only 27% tax deferred. I had no access to retirement accounts for my first five working years and the small companies I've worked for have had no employer match for their 401(k) plans. It turns out they've also had a lot of hidden fees dragging down performance as well.
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Old 07-20-2007, 08:59 AM   #8
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It totally sucks not having access to a deferred acct. The DW's gig hasn't gotten off their can to get something started. Not being able to defer some tax is bunk.

Of course, having a deferred plan with a bunch of expenses is arguably as bad.
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:02 AM   #9
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About 40% in tax deferred accounts, the other 60% is mostly index funds/ETFs, no bonds to speak of.

Been paying down my mortgage lately - I guess that's just about the most illiquid investment of all.
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:22 AM   #10
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I'm 38 and have about 30% taxable, 70% tax-deferred. I have a good 401(k) plan that I started contributing to as soon as I started working. I save more in taxable now than tax-deferred, so that percentage will go up over time.

I'm about 5% in bonds and 7% in cash right now, the rest is in stocks, mutual funds, ETFs.
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:42 AM   #11
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I'm only something like 7% taxable, the vast majority of my hoard is in tax-deferred.

Yes I know I'm way outta whack but it's just been easier over time building up the deferred stuff, while the taxable always seems to rise and fall with the times...

- John
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:46 AM   #12
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I am 59 and plan to retire in 2-3 years.

Right now I have 17% in taxable

When I retire, I will have 20-25% in taxable.

I am not including equity in my (paid off) home, since I do not regard that as an investment so much as a place to live. I paid it off about 8 months ago and my taxable is growing much faster now.
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Old 07-20-2007, 10:09 AM   #13
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Tax-deferred - 81%
Cash - 15%
Taxable - 4%

Just started building taxable equities after hitting our first e-savings milestone (3 months living expenses).. cash will grow slower now to about 1 year living expenses over the next few years. Cash is overweighted right now because it includes an invoice that a client paid yesterday.... may stay overweighted as we figure some goals out.

Tax-deferred is where it's at because we've tried to consistantly max out my wife's 401k. We're both aiming for the max this year. (and boy does that hurt!)

edit: Also, number doesn't include our house but that wouldn't matter in the percentages
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Old 07-20-2007, 11:01 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Webzter View Post
Tax-deferred - 81%
Cash - 15%
Taxable - 4%

Just started building taxable equities after hitting our first e-savings milestone (3 months living expenses).. cash will grow slower now to about 1 year living expenses over the next few years. Cash is overweighted right now because it includes an invoice that a client paid yesterday.... may stay overweighted as we figure some goals out.
Now that's a client I'd want to keep! Maybe he would like the same goods/services again soon?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Webzter View Post
Tax-deferred is where it's at because we've tried to consistantly max out my wife's 401k. We're both aiming for the max this year. (and boy does that hurt!)

edit: Also, number doesn't include our house but that wouldn't matter in the percentages
It hurts to contribute the max, that's for sure. But, it really is great for those wanting to retire early to be able to contribute so much if they can (I remember when my maximum 401K contribution was $2K!! ).

I contribute the max too and my max is $20K, due to over-50. I just figure that my salary is really $20K less than what it supposedly is, and go from there. When pension benefits were dissolved and replaced with 401K's, we took a huge hit.
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Old 07-20-2007, 11:07 AM   #15
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Tax-deferred - 20%
Pensions - 28%

Retired 5 years, 35 years to go
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Old 07-20-2007, 11:24 AM   #16
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I contribute the max too and my max is $20K, due to over-50.
Want2retire,

I will be 50 next year, March 2008. A couple questions for you:

1) Can I begin raising my limit to 20K on Jan 1, 2008, or do I have to wait until my birthday?

2) Do I have to notify (fill out paper work) my employee or the IRS that I qualify for the extra 5k catch up? Or do they already know, given that I have all my personal data?

Thanks
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Old 07-20-2007, 12:02 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Sam View Post
Want2retire,

I will be 50 next year, March 2008. A couple questions for you:
...
Thanks
1) You can raise your limit on Jan 1, 2008. $20,500 is this year's limit. My spouse has a November birthday. She raised her limit 11 months before she turned 50.
2) No. They already have your personal data.
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Old 07-20-2007, 12:59 PM   #18
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Now that's a client I'd want to keep! Maybe he would like the same goods/services again soon?
It's on-going work

Remember, when you don't have a lot in your investments, a small infusion can really inflate your numbers without meaning much.
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Old 07-20-2007, 01:44 PM   #19
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100% tax deferred.

Once I get my emer fund up there, then perhaps I'll start saving some in a taxable account for retirement.
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Old 07-20-2007, 01:54 PM   #20
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72 % of my liquid is in taxable accounts.

Ha
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