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Old 08-08-2015, 09:42 PM   #21
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As you get older, you have less patience for the mundane megacorp hoops that you must jump through. Far too many useless meetings, doping things just to do them, digging a hole just to fill it in the next day.

Your vacations can be open ended. Your time at night not cut short by 'bedtime' because of the office, the traffic in the snow not mandatory any more.

I am still not quite their yet, but I will never have to look for a job again.
Great summary - so well put! Looks like you are almost there yourself, Senator, hang in there you are gonna love ER.
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Old 08-09-2015, 03:35 AM   #22
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At your age I felt like you do. But I was aware that my energy might not last till traditional retirement age.
DH is 6 years older than I am and we wanted to get out of work together.
So we took care that we had the means to RE. At 55/61 we called it quits.

As your bosses get younger than you are, you might find your work and experience less appreciated and your knowledge regarded to be not up to date. When they have an innovative new idea your experience says that it did not work last time - and there is no reason why it should work this time.
You are lucky if you have never noticed this in your working life.
As I watched it a lot I wanted to make sure that it never happens to me.
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:15 AM   #23
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I'll pretty much repeat the others.

If you are happy where you are, that's fantastic and I don't understand why that would make you a boring person. It just makes you a happy person

The good thing about being (near) FI is that should you no longer be happy where you are, there are many more options and alternatives to explore vs. not being FI.

Knowing those options in my case raised the bar considerably on accepting less than optimal situations (as in, optimal for me). Even if I haven't completely cleared the bar on "no-brainer FI".

Now, back to ordering "How to Retire Happy, Wild and Free" to figure out my next move.
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:28 AM   #24
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Very good perspective from those who have been there, done that. I can see that work might become much more annoying if my management changes. Flexibility is key. Saving is enjoyable for me, so I don't mind doing it. In the meantime, I'm going to try not to hoard money. DH and I went to a tennis tournament for fun this week and we will do a quick beach trip next weekend. $250 tops for both and great memories.
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:51 AM   #25
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Saving is enjoyable for me, so I don't mind doing it. In the meantime, I'm going to try not to hoard money. DH and I went to a tennis tournament for fun this week and we will do a quick beach trip next weekend. $250 tops for both and great memories.
Sounds like a good balance. DH and I traveled a lot in early years back when he could squash his 6'2" frame into a Coach seat on a transatlantic flight and recover easily. Sometimes we'd get to Europe 3 times in one year, with judicious use of airline miles from my business travel. I am SO glad we didn't postpone all our travel till I retired (he's 15 years old and retired earlier). It was also a strange comfort in the years when the market tanked and huge amounts of unrealized gains evaporated. If I'd saved every dime for "someday" it would have been a lot harder to take. Knowing that we'd enjoyed some of it along the way made it sting a little less. Wonderful Spanish proverb: Nadia te quita lo bailado". (Nobody can take away from me what I've danced.)
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:55 AM   #26
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If you are generally satisfied with your job (and your life), and can't imagine how you would spend your time if retired, then I'd say you should definitely keep working. I had a good career (for the most part), but I knew without any doubt when it was time for me to retire. And since I retired, I have had no problems filling my days with things to do, so boredom has never been an issue. Heck, I don't even have time to do all the things I'd like to do.......
This and some previous posts sums up my experience. Things change, you get tired, FI gives you options. When the satisfaction and pay of working becomes less than the aggravation, it's time to retire. For some this comes early, for others not at all.
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Old 08-09-2015, 09:55 AM   #27
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I'm 48, and in the past few years, I've really grown to hate my career (I'm in IT), the jobs I've had recently, all the BS that goes along with working for other people, sitting in a cube all day, staring at a computer all day, etc, etc, etc.

I've also grown to realize that in reality, all the work I've done over my entire IT career really means nothing in the grand scheme of things. If all the work I'd done suddenly didn't exist, would anything be different? Nah, it wouldn't. Maybe if I'd worked on something as revolutionary as the iPhone, or some other such product, I'd feel differently. But the companies and products I've worked on are pretty mundane, and if they'd never existed, it wouldn't really matter.

So...for these (and other) reasons, I'm definitely ready to quit, walk out the door, and get on with the next phase of my life. I wanted to do it in 2015, but ended doing a OMY, so my new date is June 1, 2016. On that date, I don't care how well or how poorly my company stock is doing, I'm walking. I'll live under a bridge and eat cat food if I have to, but I'm walking out the door.

My stupid boss (whom I posted a separate thread about recently) wants me to do another BS dog-and-pony-show presentation to the execs this week that is just a waste of time. Instead of doing work, he wants to talk more about it. But I'm just going to bite my tongue and do the stupid presentation knowing that in 10 more months, I'm going to quit and leave my laptop and badge on his desk and walk out, and nothing's going to stop me, and there's nothing they can do about it.

Ten more months...it's like serving the last bit of a prison sentence.
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:18 AM   #28
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I am lucky to have found a job that requires only 30-35 hours a week and pays $135k with a 15 min door to desk commute. It's a contract, however and may not last more than another 4-5 years.
Most people worry about what will fill their extra 60 hours a week including commute. You have only 37 hours a week to fill. You will find it very easy. As long as you have a strong sense of self-worth, some good friends and lots of interests, you will have no problem.

And if the contract lasts a few more years than expected, great! Getting it down to 2 days at 10 hours would be a great way for transition.
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:49 AM   #29
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Most people worry about what will fill their extra 60 hours a week including commute. You have only 37 hours a week to fill. You will find it very easy. .
Interesting take on my time breakdown! That does make it seem easier. I can sense as I move into my 40s that my body is not what it used to be. I'm in good health and everything, but even I can see that working until my FRA of 67 may not be possible. As for my work being rewarding, I'm a manager, which has its pros and cons. The biggest pro is that the feedback I get from my team is overwhelmingly positive (best manager they've had, like working for me enough to turn down a higher offer elsewhere, etc.) and I feel that I make a real impact on 23 lives. The work is not so as important as knowing that I make it a little easier for 23 people to come to their jobs and provide for their families. It's hard to say what will happen to this contract, but the customer is happy and sees the value we provide (we are a year in.) Dog and pony shows drive me nuts, so if the scope of my work changes significantly, I can see wanting to leave. I've had good jobs and bad jobs and, so far, this is the best of the best. I love my own manager and my parent company has a good head and isn't conceited. I feel very fortunate.

This is a great forum. I'm glad I posted.
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Old 08-09-2015, 11:07 AM   #30
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this is the best of the best. I love my own manager and my parent company has a good head and isn't conceited. I feel very fortunate.

This is a great forum. I'm glad I posted.
As long as there is no takeover, you should be good. As a manager (of a non-union workplace), you can reduce your workload by selectively delegating parts of your job. I did this multiple times during my career. I even took on other jobs part-time until they justified a full-time manager. So if that fits, you could manage your hours down to under 20 without reducing your billings. Just show up for the core hours (10-2)!
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Old 08-09-2015, 11:16 AM   #31
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.............
As your bosses get younger than you are, you might find your work and experience less appreciated and your knowledge regarded to be not up to date. When they have an innovative new idea your experience says that it did not work last time - and there is no reason why it should work this time.
...........
I guess how much this happens is part of the company culture. At MegaMotors, you were over the hill at 45 and fully expected to leave by 55 unless you were in top level management. OP is lucky if older workers are valued at his company.
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Old 08-09-2015, 01:49 PM   #32
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OP is lucky if older workers are valued at his company.
Ah, yes- another reason to plan to ER. It may be forced upon you. I suspect I would have been thrown out of my last job if I hadn't quit (I like to say that I fired myself because the boss didn't have the cojones to do it). I have a good network and good credentials, so I would have been in a better position than most 61-year olds, but was SO grateful I didn't have to bother looking for another job, which most likely have involved relocation to a HCOL area and a lengthy commute to some Mortgage Manor in the suburbs.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:17 PM   #33
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I had spent 9 years caring for my elderly mother and when she died I just thought - that's it! Life is short and I have diabetes and I wanted to care for myself and enjoy life. I was also tired of the bullsh*t of the management where I worked and how I was being treated and I was a manager as well. I had a pension and a 457 and saw that I could be comfortable - not rich - but I could pay bills, save money, enjoy life and not have to do what people tell me ever again. So far, it has been fantastic - 1 year, 8 months in. Retired at 54.5 years.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:25 PM   #34
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In my late 30s, about to pull the plug in October, I really have two reasons to retire:
1. Work is getting more frustrating. If I wasn't retiring I'd probably be looking for somewhere else.
2. I'm curious what I'll do in retirement. I have some plans, of course, but you never know until you get there. I know what it's like to work a full-time job, but it's getting kind of old. If it turns out I like the working life better than the retired life, I can always go back to work. I won't make as much as I do now, but that's OK since I won't need to save for retirement anymore. That money is already there. I'm really looking forward to the adventure of retirement!
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:17 PM   #35
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My stupid boss (whom I posted a separate thread about recently) wants me to do another BS dog-and-pony-show presentation to the execs this week that is just a waste of time. Instead of doing work, he wants to talk more about it. But I'm just going to bite my tongue and do the stupid presentation knowing that in 10 more months, I'm going to quit and leave my laptop and badge on his desk and walk out, and nothing's going to stop me, and there's nothing they can do about it.

Ten more months...it's like serving the last bit of a prison sentence.
Wow! Hang in there. Been there, got out, also in 10 months!

The actual w*rk was often interesting & rewarding, but top management and a few minions made it a toxic wasteland. Much time was spent talking about the obvious to inform the ignorant who would prefer to be oblivious, while maintaining the appearance of interest.

Although I hated the situation and a few of the people, I was fortunate that I never had a jerk or idiot for a direct boss. Still, it was unhealthy and counterproductive for me to be a hater, so I left because I could!
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:24 PM   #36
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I guess how much this happens is part of the company culture. At MegaMotors, you were over the hill at 45 and fully expected to leave by 55 unless you were in top level management. OP is lucky if older workers are valued at his company.
Yep, in mini-MegaCorp, you're over the hill if you are over 40 and "still" an individual contributor. Stars are inducted into management in their 30's while still impressionable. The rest of the working folks were replaced by Pacific Rim kids in their 20's. Good kids though, and they needed the work to feed their families. I know, I trained many of them. But it was time to start stepping. I was 45.

Oh, I forgot to mention, that I planned to ER at 55 when I first began my technical career. I saw what happened to my elders in their 50's. It wasn't pretty, but I learned that I needed an escape plan to pursue FI as a precursor to ER.
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Old 08-10-2015, 03:24 AM   #37
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FreeBear should rename to DancingBear
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Old 08-10-2015, 06:47 AM   #38
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It wasn't a choice for me. I enjoyed my career as a college professor. I was respected by my colleagues, administration, and students, left alone to teach my classes as I thought best for the future success of my students, and had a life style that suited me. I thought I would continue until about 70 but a serious back injury, increasing complications with arthritis and all the associated chronic pain forced me to stop.

There have been administrative changes over time and now as I look at the present conditions I would not be as content today. Now I have the pleasure of looking back at all those years with fond memories instead of regretting the decline in the environment during the last few.

Cheers!
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Old 08-10-2015, 07:51 AM   #39
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I see the journey to FIRE as more of a safety net than anything else. When my last job decided to outsource the entire department those that had planned walked away at 55-60 happy and stress free. Most of them decided that they had enough money and didn't want to restart their careers again at that age. Those that hadn't planned and were hoping to work until 70... well it was a stressful time for them through the end and many of them took big paycuts just to get work again.

Since it takes so long to actually get to FIRE I figure I can make that decision about working once I get there. Until then, its all about plugging away and getting ever so closer with every paycheck.
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Old 08-10-2015, 08:43 AM   #40
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I'm 48, and in the past few years, I've really grown to hate my career (I'm in IT), the jobs I've had recently, all the BS that goes along with working for other people, sitting in a cube all day, staring at a computer all day, etc, etc, etc.

I've also grown to realize that in reality, all the work I've done over my entire IT career really means nothing in the grand scheme of things. If all the work I'd done suddenly didn't exist, would anything be different? Nah, it wouldn't. Maybe if I'd worked on something as revolutionary as the iPhone, or some other such product, I'd feel differently. But the companies and products I've worked on are pretty mundane, and if they'd never existed, it wouldn't really matter.

So...for these (and other) reasons, I'm definitely ready to quit, walk out the door, and get on with the next phase of my life. I wanted to do it in 2015, but ended doing a OMY, so my new date is June 1, 2016. On that date, I don't care how well or how poorly my company stock is doing, I'm walking. I'll live under a bridge and eat cat food if I have to, but I'm walking out the door.

My stupid boss (whom I posted a separate thread about recently) wants me to do another BS dog-and-pony-show presentation to the execs this week that is just a waste of time. Instead of doing work, he wants to talk more about it. But I'm just going to bite my tongue and do the stupid presentation knowing that in 10 more months, I'm going to quit and leave my laptop and badge on his desk and walk out, and nothing's going to stop me, and there's nothing they can do about it.

Ten more months...it's like serving the last bit of a prison sentence.
Too bad it has worked out this way for you. The time till "retirement" will drag probably. Really sounds like you are past your "best before date" and should leave as soon as practical. Doesn't sound like you boss will miss you much?
I got to this stage as well but a little later. Left on good terms but they were not concerned when I left. Maybe even happy. Wish I could have left on a high note, but c'est la vie.
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