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Old 11-24-2010, 09:45 PM   #41
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I can only speak for myself but I have aged many years in the last two. I was very fit but personal circumstances forced me to quit my fitness workouts two years ago. I am amazed at how quickly I slipped to "old" I have started the climb back, but it will take a while.
At work, when I got to age 40 the Doc sent me for a treadmill stress test and the results were excellent. I think I lasted 13 minutes and the cardio Doc said I had the results of a 30 yr old. Later that year I had a knee injury and stopped my "part-time" job as a soccer ref. At 45 I went for another routine stress test and managed a paltry 8 minutes and was absolutely knackered exhausted, but the Doc said that everthing was just fine for my age. In my eyes however I had "aged" 15 years in the last 5.

A couple of years later I started exercising again, changed my diet and lost 40lbs. I was working at a different location when I was 50 but was back again at 53 and did another treadmill test. I managed 15 minutes and felt pretty good at the end. The Doc said the results were "truly spectacular". Assuming I can avoid serious injury or illness I fully intend to keep up the wide range of exercises I do every day - most of it very low impact.
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My Rant on What Works
Old 11-24-2010, 09:51 PM   #42
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My Rant on What Works

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Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
If we knew exactly what kind and how much exercise to do, what kind of food to eat, and what kind of supplements or drugs to take, I'm sure we could have fantastic results.

But it's so hard to know. Which reports to trust, which web sites have good info, etc.

And trial and error does not work. It's too easy to be convinced that, for example, some supplement works wonders, when it's simply that you felt extra good that month.
I have had pleasing results from the combination of various elements of my physical training: the exercise routines, diet, supplements, and prescribed medications I take or use. I have formal education and years of experience applying the scientific method, and the personal discipline not to give way to wishful thinking. (I'm a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, fwiw.) I have not fallen into the trap of thinking I know which of these training elements were crucial to my progress. TromboneAl is right, of course, that it is all too easy to think we know what is working when our evidence is in fact inconclusive. Something is working for me. I know that will power and perseverance are essential. The men in my gym, including trainers I have hired, have told me about their experiences in all these matters. That includes pointers on exercise form, diet, supplements, and hormones. Of course, they aren't sure which elements are critical to their progress either. From the look of them, I conclude that they are doing something right. For example, their recommendations got me to start using a vasodilator before each training session. That certainly seems to benefit my endurance. I had a training session this week without the vasodilator. It was noticeably tougher to get through the session. (I won't mention the particular vasolator brand I use lest I be accused of spamming, a false accusation that annoys me.) -- Ted
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Old 11-25-2010, 07:30 AM   #43
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For example, their recommendations got me to start using a vasodilator before each training session. That certainly seems to benefit my endurance. I had a training session this week without the vasodilator. It was noticeably tougher to get through the session. (I won't mention the particular vasolator brand I use lest I be accused of spamming, a false accusation that annoys me.) -- Ted
I have to admit I've never heard of a vasolator and what it does so looked it up on Wikipedia. Their definition below appears to be in Russian. Can someone translate it to simple English?

"Vasodilation is the result of relaxation in smooth muscle surrounding the blood vessels. This relaxation, in turn, relies on removing the stimulus for contraction, which depends on intracellular calcium ion concentrations and, consequently, phosphorylation of the light chain of the contractile protein myosin. Thus, vasodilation mainly works either by lowering intracellular calcium concentration or the dephosphorylation of myosin. This includes stimulation of myosin light chain phosphatase and induction of calcium symporters and antiporters that pump calcium ions out of the intracellular compartment. This is accomplished through reuptake of ions into the sarcoplasmic reticulum via exchangers and expulsion across the plasma membrane.[3] There are three main intracellular stimuli that can result in the vasodilation of blood vessels. The specific mechanism to accomplish these effects vary from vasodilator to vasodilator."
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Old 11-25-2010, 11:06 AM   #44
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I have to admit I've never heard of a vasolator and what it does so looked it up on Wikipedia. Their definition below appears to be in Russian. Can someone translate it to simple English?
I had to do some looking up as well. My interpretation is that it is dilation (opening up) of the blood vessels and there are drugs you take to make this happen. Certainly not something I am going to do just to improve my exercise work outs.

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Vasodilators are used to treat conditions such as hypertension, where the patient has an abnormally high blood pressure, as well as angina and congestive heart failure, where maintaining a lower blood pressure reduces the patient's risk of developing other cardiac problems.[2] Flushing may be a physiological response to vasodilators. Viagra, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, works to increase blood flow in the penis through vasodilation. It may also be used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
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Old 11-25-2010, 12:08 PM   #46
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I've told the story before of how I fell off the treadmill a couple of years ago. I was looking out the window over the pool at the gym when a very pretty lady in a bikini climbed out and walked to the lounger under the window in front of me. Anything that causes an imbalance at a critical moment can be disastarous
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Old 11-25-2010, 12:48 PM   #47
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As you have said, people use sports supplements to improve the results we get from our exercise programs. It's misleading, I think, to refer to vasodilators as drugs. Some vasodilalors are drugs, to be sure, and require prescriptions. Other vasodilators are over-the-counter sports supplements that do not require any prescription. These are what I use. Improving my training results is important to me. My primary care physician is cautious. He has raised no objection to the various sports supplements I use. You can tell looking at him that he knows something from personal experience about athletic training -- not only what medical school teaches.
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91-years old and still competing
Old 11-26-2010, 09:56 AM   #48
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91-years old and still competing

Here's an interesting article about a 91-year-old Canadian athlete:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/ma...pagewanted=all

omni
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Old 11-26-2010, 10:51 AM   #49
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Here's an interesting article about a 91-year-old Canadian athlete:
Interesting indeed; thanks for the reference. Nice new jargon: "compression of morbidity". I wish I enjoyed exercise. I do some, but it's no fun at all.
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Old 11-26-2010, 11:06 AM   #50
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Here's an interesting article about a 91-year-old Canadian athlete:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/ma...pagewanted=all

omni
Very interesting.

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While most younger masters athletes were jocks in college if not before, many competitors in the higher brackets — say, older than age 70 — have come to the game late. They weren’t athletes earlier in life because of the demands of career and their own growing families. Only after their duties cleared could they tend that other fire.
There's hope for me yet

I got talking to an old guy I met at the Starbucks in our local store this week. He was obviously old but had great poise and posture, not a sign of old age stooping ar hunched shoulders etc.

When I asked, he told me that he was 91, and did no more than walking and flexibility exercises, that he did every single day. Nice to know that you don't have to be a super athlete to maintain your physique as you get older. (unless he was fibbing, and actually worked out for hours in the gymn every day).
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Old 11-26-2010, 11:17 AM   #51
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Here's an interesting article about a 91-year-old Canadian athlete:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/ma...pagewanted=all
omni
Whoa.

So now I shouldn't feel so bad about all those bazooka-puking workouts?
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Old 11-26-2010, 11:55 AM   #52
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When I asked, he told me that he was 91, and did no more than walking and flexibility exercises, that he did every single day.
I'm thinking that the "every single day" thing is important for me. Yesterday after exercise, I was rather sore, and the only thing different about that day was that I had taken the two days previous off -- no exercise.

I don't take these anecdotes very seriously, because what I've gathered from several recent articles on fitness and old age is that people differ a lot in how well they age and how they respond to exercise.
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Old 11-26-2010, 12:18 PM   #53
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I'm thinking that the "every single day" thing is important for me. Yesterday after exercise, I was rather sore, and the only thing different about that day was that I had taken the two days previous off -- no exercise.

I don't take these anecdotes very seriously, because what I've gathered from several recent articles on fitness and old age is that people differ a lot in how well they age and how they respond to exercise.
No argument here. We had planned to go for a long bike today but it is wet and cold and our willpower to exercise at all quickly disappeared.

My FIL died at 85 this year and looked great right up to a few weeks before he died. He was never sick and never, ever, did any formal exercise. He worked in a warehouse until he retired at 60 and was keen on gardening but that was it. Genes definitely play a big part in how we age imo.
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Old 11-26-2010, 11:59 PM   #54
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It does seem like many of the people who were serious athletes during their younger years deal with a lot of physical problems as they get older as a result. One of my regular golfing partners was a semi-pro baseball player who had to have hip replacement surgery later in life and cannot walk 18 holes now. Another member of our club is an ex-NFL player who has more 'zippers' on his legs then I have in my closet. He also has difficulty walking around. I guess it's all about moderation.
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Old 11-27-2010, 01:28 PM   #55
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And this is interesting:

Louise Levy just one of 500 centenarians, whose genes are being studied for secret to longevity

Many of them smoked more, exercised less and weighed more throughout their lives than people who typically live shorter lives, Barzilai said.
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Interpreting the Data on Longevity
Old 11-27-2010, 02:29 PM   #56
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Interpreting the Data on Longevity

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Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
And this is interesting:

Louise Levy just one of 500 centenarians, whose genes are being studied for secret to longevity

Many of them smoked more, exercised less and weighed more throughout their lives than people who typically live shorter lives, Barzilai said.
Let me assume for the moment that the data base is large enough to be significant, and that appropriate statistical methods were used. Then a legitimate conclusion from this report is that smoking less, exercising more, and maintaining a healthy body weight are no guarantees of long life. An unsupported conclusion is that healthful practices are irrelevant to longevity so you may as well enjoy your bad habits. (In fact, I knew a man who never smoked and died young of lung cancer anyway. Want to chance it?) -- Ted, resident Puritan and statistician
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Infirmities of Old Age
Old 11-27-2010, 03:01 PM   #57
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Infirmities of Old Age

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It does seem like many of the people who were serious athletes during their younger years deal with a lot of physical problems as they get older as a result. One of my regular golfing partners was a semi-pro baseball player who had to have hip replacement surgery later in life and cannot walk 18 holes now. Another member of our club is an ex-NFL player who has more 'zippers' on his legs then I have in my closet. He also has difficulty walking around. I guess it's all about moderation.
I can't argue with your cautious personal observations. Sports injuries occur and may persist. Still, it is true also, isn't it?, that many people who were not serious athletes during their younger years also deal with a lot of physical problems as they get older. That may be a result of inactivity or obesity or substance abuse and may be for some other reasons.

The definition of "moderation" may vary with differences in experience, interest, and will power between people. I work hard in the gym for an hour or a little more about four days out of five. With some breaks, I have done this for years, even when I worked for a living. (Originally, it was three days in seven, but grew gradually.) Some people have asked me how I find or found the time for that. I ask them how much time they spend looking at television or cruising the internet or playing computer games. When I worked, I made it a point to move close to any new job I took so that I did not have to spend a lot of time commuting. Of course, I never raised a family, so YMMV. I did have a professional occupation where the bosses expected us to contribute endless amounts of unpaid overtime. Now that all my time is my own, it's easier to give high priority to preserving and enhancing my health.

-- Ted, resident Puritan
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Old 11-27-2010, 03:10 PM   #58
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And this is interesting:

Louise Levy just one of 500 centenarians, whose genes are being studied for secret to longevity

Many of them smoked more, exercised less and weighed more throughout their lives than people who typically live shorter lives, Barzilai said.
I think "extra long" lived folks have a strong link to genetics, more than any other factors. I only hope I have some of those genes that my father and great grandfather had. Both were heavy smokers from being young and both were underground coal miners for all their working lives from age 14. My great grandfather also served for all 4 years of WWI and was discharged in 1919 as 60% disabled (we have his war record). He was gassed twice and shot in the arm, and returned to the war each time. In 1938 he fell down a mineshaft and shattered both legs, needing to have one amputated. He was still a formidable chap right up to his death at age 92.

For the vast majority, the best we can do is live as healthily as we can.
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Old 11-27-2010, 04:28 PM   #59
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(In fact, I knew a man who never smoked and died young of lung cancer anyway. Want to chance it?)
Without wishing to imply that lack of exercise, smoking, consumption of lots of high fructose corn syrup, red meat and animal fat, and so on, are not risk factors for cancer, I see many reports from cancer victims (reading cancer forums, as I do), complaining that they've done everything right, with life-long practices of vigorous exercise, healthful diet, and, generally speaking, clean living. Yet they got cancer. It does happen.
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Old 11-27-2010, 05:04 PM   #60
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I think "extra long" lived folks have a strong link to genetics, more than any other factors.
There is little doubt about this:
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Male siblings of centenarians have an 17 times greater chance than other men born around the same time of reaching age 100 years and female siblings have an 8˝ greater chance than other females also born around the same time of achieving age 100.
Why Study Centenarians? An Overview » New England Centenarian Study » BUMC
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