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Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-10-2007, 01:40 AM   #1
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Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

It's been awhile since I posted here because I have been busy semi-FIREing (yeah!) at age 41 and am trying to find a high deductible (~$5000), HSA-eligible health insurance policy in North San Diego County California. I would like to submit my applications next week. That is also when my 59 day opt in/out COBRA clock will start clicking (my last day is this Friday) and hopefully I can avoid paying any COBRA premiums at all.

Hopefully, these random questions that I have will help other people in the future, too. And at the end of the process, I promise to summarize everything that I have learned. I posted here previously and got some helpful answers, especially from MKLD. I may be out of the country quite a bit the next three years or so, so I am focused on a high deductible HSA policy. I would like to get a policy that will allow me to move across state lines in the future so that I don't become a prisoner of California. But I am weighing this as just one factor.


* I am assuming that negotiated rates apply to my deductible for any policy

* I think that I am mostly healthy, and unlikely to get rejected for a policy and probable but not a shoo-in for the preferred rate. So for how many policies should I simultaneously apply? I have COBRA as a backstop at $400/month. Whereas my health insurance will probably be around $110/month if I get the preferred rate. And I can avoid paying any COBRA if I get this done in the next 2 months. I am thinking I should apply for two policies next week. Comments?

* Can I stop an in-process application -- if I get approved for a policy that I would like to accept, can I stop another application in process for which I have applied? I don't want a rejection on my record.

* Out of Network coverage -- This seems to be a key area of difference among policies. Three policies that I am considering:

1) Aetna: Deductible goes from $5000 to $10000 out-of-network, otherwise identical charges in or out of network.

2) Nationwide: Covers 50% out-of-network professional and doctor charges and has $800 daily MAXIMUM reimbursement for out-of-network hospitalization (and only covers 50%). I asked the agent about that ridiculously low MAX, and he said they had "emergency provisions" and would usually preapprove temporary stays in an emergency (although he does not have much experience with them). I think they do have a nationwide network.

3) Blue Cross of California: Covers all out-of-network charges for hospitalization after deductible EXCEPT $650/day and 50% of professional services and doctor costs.

I don't really have a sense how important thorough out-of-network coverage is or what to look for, any hints? All my local hospitals will be in all three networks.


* Coverage across state lines -- Based on information that I got here and also from my health insurance agent, it seems the following companies offer some portability across state lines without underwriting again (thus, you won't be a prisoner in a certain state if you get a pre-existing condition):

Golden Rule, Humana, Celtic, Nationwide, Assurant Health

Of course, the two policies that are available in my zip code, Nationwide and Assurant Health, do not seem to be as good of a deal as some other policies like Aetna and Blue Cross of California. I am still researching availability for the others in my zip code, although they don't show up in ehealthinsurance.com. Should I try to get portability provisions in writing? Is this possible or is it just an insurance company policy that could be rescinded at any time? I have a call with Nationwide tomorrow asking about cross state portability.

* One policy has a $2000 annual prescription max (and it only covers beyond deductible). I am assuming this is probably too low. Also, Nationwide restricts you to the "Medco" pharmaceutical network for pharmaceuticals. Is this reasonable? So far, I can only query locations by having a member number, so I can't tell how ubiquitous it is.

Kramer (thanks in advance)
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-10-2007, 07:09 AM   #2
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

I am on Cobra, and just starting to look. I will be interested in your summaries.

You may want to plan on paying the Cobra until the replacement becomes finalized. At $400 per month, this is not an excessive cost.

Also, in PA, blue cross / blue shield is available only after the cobra expires.

Good luck, and please advise of your findings.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-10-2007, 08:23 AM   #3
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Kramer,

I just got done writing an Assurant Health plan for a client who travels nationwide a LOT. She opted for Assurant health mostly due to the HUGE PHCS network (network is Private Healthcare Systems www.phcs.com).

She decided to pay the slightly higher rate for the better network and better state to state portability. There's no point in getting a letter of portability from the carrier. It's either going to be portable or it's not depending on whether they do business in the state you are moving to.

Assurant Health/Time Insurance, previously Fortis, has been in business for many, many, many years (I believe over 50 years if I am not mistaken) in the individual health insurance business. They have other lines of business, but individual health insurance is their main business, therefore, your risk of them pulling out of the individual market any anytime would be very slim.....And I have found them to offer coverage in the large majority of states. i have checked with them before on this and if you move to a state where they are doing business, you don't have to requalify when you move. You simply have to report the address change, and your rates will change based on the rates they offer in that state.

If you move, your rate will change based on the rates they offer in the state you move to. Another neat thing about Assurant Health is that they have added to their 5000 deductible plan, the ability to purchase an inexpensive rate guarantee option to guarantee your rates for a period of 36 months before you get your first rate increase. Knowing how often Assurant Health takes rate increases (approx. every 9 months), I do recommend the rate guarantee option. It's only like an extra 7 or 8 bucks a month!

Assurant Health is not going to offer very good overseas coverage, but you can always purchase supplemental travel insurance when necessary.

In your situation, I would really recommend Assurant Health. Especially since you are retiring early and you want a company that is going to be there when you need it now and in years to come.


Just FYI - Aetna just started in the individual market very recently and their primary products are large and small group health insurance, so the risk of them pulling out of the individual market if it becomes unprofitable is much higher than Assurant. I think they are only doing business right now in about 1/2 the states, too. That's not to say that it won't become more extensive, but right now, they are relatively new in the individual market.

Blue Cross has TERRIBLE state to state portability, and you typically have to requalify if you move.

Nationwide sounds like a LIMITED BENEFIT PLAN TO ME WITH THAT CAP ON OUT OF NETWORK REIMBURSEMENT. I don't like limited benefit plans. They come and go and they are typically not dependable. Better than nothing, but not a good product if you are planning on having the coverage through age 65.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 12:42 AM   #4
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

MKLD, thanks for the usual great advice. OK, based on what you have written, I am only going to consider policies portable across state lines. IMO, this is a fundamental differentiator. I sense that most people don't know about this. And thanks for the info on Aetna.

Here is something else I have learned: ehealthinsurance.com does not necessarily contain all carriers and not all of their info is accurate. When I went to the Assurant Health site I got somewhat different rates and options than were listed on ehealthinsurance.com. Also, Celtic insurance is available directly from their web site even though it is nowhere to be found on ehealthinsurance. Basically, ehealthinsurance.com is a pretty good guide, but you need to go to individual insurance company web sites to verify and dig for more detailed information.

When I went to the Golden Rule website, it looks like the PacifiCare plan available in the San Diego area is underwritten by them. They are called United Health Care in most other locales. So does that mean that this PacificCare is also a portable policy (i.e., portable to United Health Care areas that are also underwritten by Golden Rule)? Do you feel the same about Golden Rule as about Assurant, also (PacificCare/UnitedHealthCAre)?

There is a basic Assurant Health HDHP that has a lifetime max of only $2Million, a max annual prescription benefit of $2000, and max outpatient care annual maximum of around $20K. You need to pay 30% more per month in order to increase the lifetime max and to get rid of the prescription and outpatient limitations. The price of the plan without the limitations really isn't that competitive (75% more than Aetna's local offering, 35% more than BlueCross). Since I have no problem going to another country for health care with an efficient private system if it came to that and I am perfectly healthy, now at least, I might lean toward the plan with lower limits.

I also see the Assurant Health rate guarantee you are talking about there -- they extend the rate guarantee to 24/36 months if you go with a $5000 deductible (which is what I want). Actually, I didn't think a plan with only a $2M lifetime max was legal in California, I thought that they required either $5 or $6 Million lifetime max but I verified their offering on ehealthinsurance and directly on the Assurant web site.

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 12:45 AM   #5
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb56
I am on Cobra, and just starting to look. I will be interested in your summaries.

You may want to plan on paying the Cobra until the replacement becomes finalized. At $400 per month, this is not an excessive cost.

Also, in PA, blue cross / blue shield is available only after the cobra expires.

Good luck, and please advise of your findings.
kb56, if possible, I'd like to avoid paying any COBRA -- if I opt in I will owe for a minimum of 3 months and that is $1200. Whereas using my two month COBRA opt in/out free 2 month period, my non-COBRA option will cost me less than $200 for that same time period. I would rather save the $1000, if possible. Admittedly, it is not the end of the world or even a big deal if I must pay COBRA to get the private insurance that I need. Also, feel free to PM me for my email address if you need more info than you see in the threads. I am happy to share any information.

BTW, putting $2800 toward my HSA this year will save me $700 in federal taxes. Unfortunately, California does not allow an HSA tax deduction for California state income taxes.

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 08:50 AM   #6
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer
When I went to the Golden Rule website, it looks like the PacifiCare plan available in the San Diego area is underwritten by them. They are called United Health Care in most other locales. So does that mean that this PacificCare is also a portable policy (i.e., portable to United Health Care areas that are also underwritten by Golden Rule)? Do you feel the same about Golden Rule as about Assurant, also (PacificCare/UnitedHealthCAre)?

There is a basic Assurant Health HDHP that has a lifetime max of only $2Million, a max annual prescription benefit of $2000, and max outpatient care annual maximum of around $20K. You need to pay 30% more per month in order to increase the lifetime max and to get rid of the prescription and outpatient limitations. The price of the plan without the limitations really isn't that competitive (75% more than Aetna's local offering, 35% more than BlueCross). Since I have no problem going to another country for health care with an efficient private system if it came to that and I am perfectly healthy, now at least, I might lean toward the plan with lower limits.

I also see the Assurant Health rate guarantee you are talking about there -- they extend the rate guarantee to 24/36 months if you go with a $5000 deductible (which is what I want). Actually, I didn't think a plan with only a $2M lifetime max was legal in California, I thought that they required either $5 or $6 Million lifetime max but I verified their offering on ehealthinsurance and directly on the Assurant web site.

Kramer
Hi Kramer,

The plan you are talking about with Assurant Health is the SaveRight HSA plan. I am not a big fan of the benefit limitation on the prescription drugs, and I feel it is a much better plan without that limitation. There is also a limited benefit on that plan for outpatient care which you can only buy up to $25,000 annual benefit. I REALLY don't like limited benefit plans. As soon as you get one, you are going to end up reaching one of the limits and you are not going to be very happy. These kinds of plans tend to leave people under-insured. Again, they are better than nothing, but if you can afford to buy the better coverage, I would stick with that. Assurant Health's One Deductible plan is a much better plan! Granted, in the longrun, you will pay more, but I think it is worthwhile for the extra benefit you get.

United Healthcare owns both Pacificare and Golden Rule. They were both bought out by UHC within the past couple of years. Unfortunately, the buyout took it's toll on the level of customer service you get, but they are finally starting to work out some of the kinks. With any of these plans, you are being underwritten and insured by UHC. Golden Rule offers you the option to use the UHC Choice Plus network which is a great, nationwide network. The Pacificare network is going to be more limited, especially as you go eastward. Golden Rule is a very solid company with a very solid HSA plan. I would avoid their HSA Saver plan..again, it is a limited benefit. Stick with the HSA 100 option.

To answer your question about Pacificare being portable to UHC and Golden Rule and vice versa, the answer is a resounding NO. The divisions operate independently, and they will re-underwrite you going from one subdivision to the next. With Golden Rule, you can only be portable to other states that have Golden rule plans, and with Pacificare, you can only be portable to other states that have Pacificare.

Celtic Insurance sounds like a great buy on the search engines, and don't get me wrong...the company is reputable and has been around Forever, but their marketing has much to be desired. Only about 10% of the people that apply actually qualify for the "Preferred" rates that they quote. It is based on height and weight guidelines. The rest of the majority of the population will qualify for "Standard" rates, which are 10% higher than the quotes you will get on the internet, even from their direct site.....soo....don't be disappointed if you don't qualify for their "Preferred Rates"....most people don't.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 09:23 AM   #7
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

I am quite familiar with Assurant from a credit and business perspective. Health insurance is only one of many lines they are in, but I would say that the company is overall quite solid and unlikely to exit the HSA market any time soon. If memory serves, they sold the first HSA policy ever.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 10:31 AM   #8
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by mykidslovedogs

I am not a big fan of the benefit limitation on the prescription drugs, and I feel it is a much better plan without that limitation.

...

Assurant Health's One Deductible plan is a much better plan! Granted, in the longrun, you will pay more, but I think it is worthwhile for the extra benefit you get.
MKLD, thanks for the useful analysis.

I went to the Assurant site and entered my details (male, 60, SF Bay area) and the quotes for the two plans you mention are $389.66 and $773.48 per month. So eliminating the limit on prescription coverage is quite expensive!

Peter
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 04:51 PM   #9
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Hi Peter,

Ugh, those rates are high.. What state are you in? Which plan was the one that was over $700.00? Oh, nevermind...I get it....the Rightstart was the $389 and the One Deductible was $773. In that case, I would definately consider the RightStart...especially if you are in excellent health. You just need to decide if the benefit limitations are worth the additional risk..

If you are OK with taking the risk on having the prescription limitation, then I would say it is better than having no coverage at all, and the limited benefit plan does still give you the ability to save in an HSA account. I am not saying that limited benefit plans are terrible, I just think if the better plan is affordable, then I would go with the plan without the limits. Otherwise, I say go for the RightStart or HSA Saver plans. They are definately better than going without! Don't forget that the RightStart HSA plan also has a limited benefit on outpatient care too. It's not just on the prescriptions.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-11-2007, 07:27 PM   #10
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by mykidslovedogs


Ugh, those rates are high.. What state are you in?
MKLD, I'm in California. For many years I've been with Blue Cross, but it seemed like every couple of years I got hit by a big premium increase. The latest was to over $400 per month, for a high deductible HSA policy. And I'm in excellent health, no prescriptions, last physical all good, etc., etc. I shudder to think what premiums would be if I had, say, high blood pressure.

Anyway, I bailed last month and signed up with Kaiser Permanente. Not ideal, and they also have prescription limits, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed health-wise. However, it's 'only' $240 per month.

But you can perhaps see why I'm not too happy with the current US healthcare system ....

Peter
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-12-2007, 12:41 AM   #11
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
To answer your question about Pacificare being portable to UHC and Golden Rule and vice versa, the answer is a resounding NO. The divisions operate independently, and they will re-underwrite you going from one subdivision to the next. With Golden Rule, you can only be portable to other states that have Golden rule plans, and with Pacificare, you can only be portable to other states that have Pacificare.
Great info, thanks! So is Aetna portable to other states where it is offered? It is available in all of the places that I might move, but the Aetna in Texas is called Aetna Life Insurance Company whereas in the other places it is called Aetna, so I thought that might be one of those non-portable subdivisions or something. Health Net appears to be state specific in their naming (Health Net of California, etc.).

Quote:
Celtic Insurance sounds like a great buy on the search engines, and don't get me wrong...the company is reputable and has been around Forever, but their marketing has much to be desired.
Yes, and their web site and brochures were difficult for me to decipher, too. I don't think they had an HSA, either.

So my portable options appear to come down to Assurant Health and Nationwide. And perhaps Aetna? Nationwide is rated A+ Superior on the A.M. rating system and yet I hear very little about it. Unfortunately, Assurant is not very cost competitive in the San Diego area, but I may just pay more for it.

So my next task is to research Nationwide portability to places that I might move and portability as a company policy, in particular (I have been too busy to call them but I will). And it sounds like there is no question that Assurant Health is portable across state lines. And I have not found anything yet on out-of-network payments for Assurant Health but I will research it.

Re: Assurant outpatient limits -- How likely are outpatient procedures to exceed, say, $20K? For instance, would a hernia operation where you recuperate at home be considered outpatient? Arthroscopic surgery on your knee? They do count prescription reimbursement toward your outpatient costs. I am a little confused on how procedures are classified. Another thing to consider is inflation -- I am assuming these limits do not rise over the lifetime of the policy?

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-12-2007, 12:50 AM   #12
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter
MKLD, thanks for the useful analysis.

I went to the Assurant site and entered my details (male, 60, SF Bay area) and the quotes for the two plans you mention are $389.66 and $773.48 per month. So eliminating the limit on prescription coverage is quite expensive!

Peter
Peter, I think you did not use the higher deductible. I am in the Bay Area in downtown San Jose, and for a 60 year old male in my zip code I get $272 and $372 ($5K deductible, minimum options). Also, you get a rate guarantee for 24 months and you can cheaply buy one for 36 months -- this is over 60% of the time remaining before you are 65 so this is a big deal! Also, you have a better handle on your health and prescription costs in the next five years, whereas someone my age (41) does not have the same insight into his health 20 years from now. This makes it safer for you to go with the lower reimbursement options, including lifetime out-of-pocket, since you have only a few years to use it up before Medicare.

If you are only paying $240/month that is a fantastic deal! To get the great quality health care in the US at that price sounds like a fantastic bargain. And you will be eligible for Medicare in five years.

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-12-2007, 10:44 AM   #13
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer
Peter, I think you did not use the higher deductible.
Kramer
Kramer, thanks, you are quite correct ... I didn't notice the pulldown box for higher deductibles. Actually, my main interest was to compare the two plans that MKLD quoted ... although now I see that the high deductible SaveRight option is not much more than Kaiser, I'm thinking about another switch. I'm sure you've heard the same good/bad stories about Kaiser that I have!

You're also right about Medicare being on the horizon, although as it's turning out, that isn't exactly a low cost deal either!

Anyway, I seem to have hijacked your original post, so time to stand back, I think!

Peter
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-13-2007, 09:53 AM   #14
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Hi Kramer,

You can go to www.aetna.com to get more info about their individual plans. If you try to run a quote, you should be able to get a dropdown list of all the states they are in so far.

As far as outpatient surgery goes, to tell you the truth, I don't have any kind of charts on the average cost. I know I have had a few clients with complex knee/shoulder surgeries in excess of $40,000.
And you are right, those limits aren't going to go up as inflation goes up, either, so that's definately something to consider. Also, it's not a per occurrance limit, it's a per year limit, so if more than one surgery needed to be performed in a calendar year, it wouldn't be hard to exceed the limit.

In Colorado, Celtic does offer an HSA. It's called the CelticSaver HSA plan. I'm not sure what is offered in other state. you can get quotes and info. on www.celtic-net.com


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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 06:36 PM   #15
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

I just wanted to share what I have found out. My options in the San Diego area for a portable, HSA-eligible policy appear to be: Assurant Health, Aetna, and Nationwide.

Assurant Health: I have not actually called them, but MKLD has firmly confirmed their portability. Probably the safest bet from a financial perspective. I will probably call because I have a couple of other questions. Unfortunately, their policy price is not very competitive in the San Diego area (or California). In most other states I have checked, they are quite competitive. They have a slimmed down plan available but I am leary about the $2000 annual prescription coverage limit on that policy.

Aetna: I received confirmation from an Aetna underwriter that their policies are portable without undergoing additional underwriting. Specifically, portable from California to Arizona or Texas (presumably portable to anywhere Aetna provides individual coverage, but the underwriter responded to my specific query). I had also mentioned that the Aetna division that covers insurance in Texas is different than the division that covers Arizona and California. Here is the complete reply:
Quote:
Aetna California individual plans are portable to either Texas or Arizona. Underwriting would apply if you decided to choose a different plan with more benefits in either of those states. If the plan goes under a different name, you are required to sign a "joinder agreement". It states that you understand the plan is underwritten under a different Aetna name. It doesn't change the benefits or how you are covered.
Aetna easily has the best rates for me in the San Diego area, and they are apparently a growing presence in the individual market (although not as ubiquitous as Assurant Health, as MKLD has stated). Their partnership with AARP was announced yesterday where they will provide individual coverage to AARP members aged 50-64. Also, their financial health appears to be quite good. So I am feeling better about them in the individual market after doing a little research.

Nationwide: Can only sell policies in California or Ohio -- they can sell policies to already existing customers in other states, but not to new customers. But you can move from California or Ohio and they will cover you without underwriting. Their network is nationwide (and I confirmed available in geos I care about), presumably has to do with their group coverage. Your rates seem to be tied to the California/Ohio zip code you last lived in. I am more leary of them because they could drop this idea of national coverage at any time, presumably -- the folks most likely to keep the insurance across state lines are the sickest. Also, it is a disadvantage that their rates are tied to California rates (see below).

I am still researching, but I will probably pick the best plan for me and apply this week. I may wait a week or two and then apply for a second backup plan. If I get the first one, then I will stop the process on the second application. My 59 day COBRA clock has not yet started ticking (still have not received my COBRA packet), but will shortly.

There is a strong possibility that California will become a mandatory issue state this year for private insurers (must insure all who apply). The legislature will be taking this up shortly with the support of the governor (it is part of a broader reform, but the details are sketchy, all residents would also be required to have health insurance). Presumably, I will have already acquired private insurance before this happens. However, if the mandatory issue comes into affect, will the rate on my existing policy increase? Or would that only affect new policyholders seeking insurance in the private market after that change? (please no political comments, just looking for facts) If the cost does go up significantly, then this is another reason to have a state portability option.

Finally, I was a bit surprised to see that none of the insurers above are among the top 15 insurers of private individual health plans in the US. See chart at:

http://www.thestreet.com/_yahoo/fund...0350253_2.html

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 06:58 PM   #16
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Kramer,

I'm impressed by your knowlege and willingness to dig in and get the proper information before applying for coverage! How would you like to come and work with me in Colorado? heehee.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 07:00 PM   #17
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer
There is a strong possibility that California will become a mandatory issue state this year for private insurers (must insure all who apply). The legislature will be taking this up shortly with the support of the governor (it is part of a broader reform, but the details are sketchy, all residents would also be required to have health insurance). Presumably, I will have already acquired private insurance before this happens. However, if the mandatory issue comes into affect, will the rate on my existing policy increase? Or would that only affect new policyholders seeking insurance in the private market after that change? (please no political comments, just looking for facts) If the cost does go up significantly, then this is another reason to have a state portability option.

http://www.thestreet.com/_yahoo/fund...0350253_2.html

Kramer
Kramer,

If California goes "guaranteed issue" the likely outcome is that most of the the individual insurance carrier(s) will drop out of the state. With only one or two competitors (like in NY) and the anticipation of adverse selection on the horizon, rates will go sky high! Nationwide, IMO, would be gone in a heartbeat, and you, like the people who had Mutual of Omaha, will be left without coverage....even if you have developed any health conditions while covered.
They (California's government) aren't going to be able to FORCE the insurance carriers to stay in the market. If health insurance carriers project that the legislation will result in high loss ratios, the private carriers will leave the market in CA. I would steer clear of Nationwide if they don't operate in any other states.

I wonder how they are going to FORCE people to buy insurance without somehow placing price controls in the insurance carriers that are left after the fallout? Is the gov't going to pick up a certain percent of the cost based on income of the insured?
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 07:18 PM   #18
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

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Originally Posted by mykidslovedogs
Kramer,

I'm impressed by your knowlege and willingness to dig in and get the proper information before applying for coverage! How would you like to come and work with me in Colorado? heehee.
But I heard it snows in Colorado I already have this offer from my current insurance agent here in California. I am totally serious.

Kramer
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 07:22 PM   #19
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

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Originally Posted by kramer
But I heard it snows in Colorado I already have this offer from my current insurance agent here in California. I am totally serious.

Kramer
That's hilarious! Well, all I can say is...it's good money....and a great, part time, flexible job that you can do in retirement. It can be very rewarding at times, too. As you can see, there really aren't too many people out there who appreciate our private system, but when you show them how it can work well for them, it's a wonderful reward.
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions
Old 04-18-2007, 07:26 PM   #20
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Re: Apply for health insurance: Specific questions

Quote:
I wonder how they are going to FORCE people to buy insurance without somehow placing price controls in the insurance carriers that are left after the fallout? Is the gov't going to pick up a certain percent of the cost based on income of the insured?
Details are sketchy right now.

There is an article on this in today's San Diego Union Tribune:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/b...b18insure.html

Quote:
The plan would require all Californians to obtain health insurance coverage. The state would subsidize policies for the working poor. Insurance companies would be required to cover everyone, including those who are sick. Businesses with 10 or more employees would pay a financial penalty for not providing insurance to workers. Some money to pay for the program would come from taxes of 2 percent on doctors' revenues and 4 percent on hospitals' revenues.
The general outline pretty much has the support of both houses of the legislature and the governor.

How much warning would one receive if carriers drop out? I would hope at least 12 months. That would give me time to establish residency elsewhere. I am pretty mobile. I could be working overseas on a one year contract while this was going on, though.

Kramer
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