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Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body
Old 05-05-2010, 09:29 PM   #1
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Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body

Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body strength?

I am shocked at how much upper body strength I don't have. I do kung fu forms, with weapons and am finding that it is killing my upper body.

And I also like photography and as a consequence, tend to lug a packsack around, with either cameras or books. And it is getting really annoying at how careful I have to do this. When I was younger, it never bothered my to lug a bag of books around, or cameras, but now, I have to be careful to be balanced, and my back really feels it after two to three hours.

So, I'm reading that "after 50", one has to do conscientious weigh training" to maintain and build strength, because there is natural muscle loss occurring.

So - are you finding this to be true?

I'm annoyed because I've always disliked weight training (high boredom factor).

V....
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:37 PM   #2
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I used to include a couple of weight training session a week - then we had children and I had to cut back on a lot of things and the weight training was one of them ( I kept doing a modest amount of cardio work). After a gap of a few years I went back to one session of weights a week and I cannot do anything like the weight levels that I used to.

As I moved into my 40s I have become convinced that it takes me longer to recover from an exercise session than it used to.
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:22 PM   #3
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Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body strength?

I am shocked at how much upper body strength I don't have. I do kung fu forms, with weapons and am finding that it is killing my upper body.

And I also like photography and as a consequence, tend to lug a packsack around, with either cameras or books. And it is getting really annoying at how careful I have to do this. When I was younger, it never bothered my to lug a bag of books around, or cameras, but now, I have to be careful to be balanced, and my back really feels it after two to three hours.

So, I'm reading that "after 50", one has to do conscientious weigh training" to maintain and build strength, because there is natural muscle loss occurring.

So - are you finding this to be true?

I'm annoyed because I've always disliked weight training (high boredom factor).

V....
In a word - Yes.

I've never liked weight training but now I do it a couple of times a week - started doing it 5 years ago when I turned 50 However, a couple of hours weight training each week is not really that big a deal.
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:32 PM   #4
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Weight train every other day and I clearly notice the difference.

Me, I'm convinced the single biggest thing I can do to enjoy my later years (early 50's now) is to maintain a consistent exercise program that includes weights. While diet is important: it is nothing without daily exercise IMH, but uneducated, O.
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:53 PM   #5
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Weight training is very helpful for women in their 50's and 60's who want to maintain their upper body strength, too. This is especially important for maintaining one's independence. Who wants to ask for help just to change a light bulb or lift a box?
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Old 05-06-2010, 01:42 AM   #6
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Weight training is very helpful for women in their 50's and 60's who want to maintain their upper body strength, too. This is especially important for maintaining one's independence. Who wants to ask for help just to change a light bulb or lift a box?
Helps with bone density, too.
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Old 05-06-2010, 08:48 AM   #7
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Yes, since my 30's. I also do push-ups, and front and side planks for core strength. It's time-consuming, and a nuisance, but then I think of an acquaintance my age who is a demi-plegic (only the right half of her body is mobile, due to a stroke at a young age) and how hard she struggles just to maintain basic mobility.

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Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body strength?

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Old 05-06-2010, 09:49 AM   #8
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Yes. Definitely since 40s. (female)

I find weight training pretty essential to maintaining my health and it seems to really help with the weight management too. I think part of this is the extra muscle mass helps burn more calories.

Not just upper body for me - lower body too, even though I do a walking and some bicycle riding.

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Old 05-06-2010, 10:09 AM   #9
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Yes. Definitely since 40s. (female)

I find weight training pretty essential to maintaining my health and it seems to really help with the weight management too. I think part of this is the extra muscle mass helps burn more calories.

Not just upper body for me - lower body too, even though I do a walking and some bicycle riding.

Audrey
+1

I also think lower body is very important as the legs are sometimes referred to as the "2nd heart", as it is vital to maintain the elasticity of the big arteries in the legs to help push blood to the extremities.
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Old 05-09-2010, 03:54 PM   #10
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I've been pretty dedicated to regular exercise for decades but it was mostly running. I was never able to stay with a weight program for any sustained period. That changed about 5 years ago when I joined a fitness center and began lifting weights twice a week (with the occasional 3rd day on a weekend at home.) I've since changed fitness centers to one that has a better variety of equipment and programs. I'm still sticking with it. At my age (65) I'll never look like Arnold but I think as I've aged it's been a good component of my overall exercise program. Now, if I could only make myself stretch with some regularity....
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Old 05-10-2010, 06:30 AM   #11
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...I'll never look like Arnold....
Good for you!

http://kroppsbygging.files.wordpress...negger_fat.jpg

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Old 05-10-2010, 09:33 AM   #12
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Amazon.com: Strength Training Past 50 - 2nd Edition (Ageless Athlete Series) (9780736067713): Wayne Westcott, Thomas R. Baechle: Books
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Old 05-10-2010, 12:06 PM   #13
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Are you having to weight train to maintain upper body strength?
No, I have the same muscle mass as a 20 year old.


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Old 05-10-2010, 12:16 PM   #14
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About 5 years ago I bought myself several sets of hand weights and starting working out with them for about 15 minutes every morning (alternating between upper and lower body exercises). I do it 6 days a week, and decided that the only way I would stick with it was to decide this was a mandatory part of my morning routine. I don't give myself an out if I just don't feel like it.

I suppose it is boring, but so is showering, making the bed, brushing my teeth, applying makeup, etc. I just put it in the same category as these tasks, and since I don't decide to forego any of those if I "don't feel like it", I can't forego the weight-bearing exercises either.

I have stuck with it and actually don't mind it too much - it really has become an integral part of my morning. Of course it's much easier now that I'm not running off to a j*b every morning.
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Old 05-10-2010, 02:48 PM   #15
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In the book I mentioned above, the author shows some research that demonstrated that the benefits of strength training three times per week were only a little better than two times per week.
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Old 05-10-2010, 02:59 PM   #16
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In the book I mentioned above, the author shows some research that demonstrated that the benefits of strength training three times per week were only a little better than two times per week.
Sounds reasonable. Still, I am good at procrastinating (maybe I should add that to the other thread). Anyway, for me sometimes it is better to aim for 4 times a week just to end up getting in 2-3 times per week.
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Old 05-10-2010, 03:03 PM   #17
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In the book I mentioned above, the author shows some research that demonstrated that the benefits of strength training three times per week were only a little better than two times per week.
Woo-Hoo!!! I only strength train twice a week - now I have a valid reason to back up that procrastination decision.

Thanks.
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Old 05-10-2010, 04:27 PM   #18
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In the book I mentioned above, the author shows some research that demonstrated that the benefits of strength training three times per week were only a little better than two times per week.
I've read that, too. The other Thing I understand is that doing 3 sets of each exercise is only marginally better than doing 2 sets (as long as you use enough weight). So there you have it - 2 sets of each exercise twice a week.
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Old 05-10-2010, 04:58 PM   #19
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I've read that, too. The other Thing I understand is that doing 3 sets of each exercise is only marginally better than doing 2 sets (as long as you use enough weight). So there you have it - 2 sets of each exercise twice a week.
Oh good! There's MY excuse for only doing 2 sets of each exercise. I do that to forestall boredom. I use enough weight to challenge myself pretty well (visualize peculiar old lady panting and grunting audibly while pumping iron, ugh! not pretty), so there you go.
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Old 05-10-2010, 06:08 PM   #20
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Sounds reasonable. Still, I am good at procrastinating (maybe I should add that to the other thread). Anyway, for me sometimes it is better to aim for 4 times a week just to end up getting in 2-3 times per week.
Thanks, W2R. I could not think of anything that I am really good at, but you solved the problem. I am very good at procrastinating!
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