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Old 10-08-2014, 11:38 PM   #21
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That is disturbing to me. I can kind of see the paramedic thing But hospitals should honor the DNR.

What state is this in. I don't believe you have to register DNRs in CA or CO (states where I dealt with hospitals while family members were terminal and dying.)
Texas. Here is a link to the state form: Texas Out of Hospital Do Not Resuscitate Program - Texas Department of State Health Services, EMS & Trauma Systems

The Fire Chief explained to me that the original purpose of this program was for out of hospital, like in nursing homes. But that FDs are using the concept - they have to see the registered bracelet or other marker to know that the patient is indeed in that program. Otherwise, they do all they can to resuscitate.

I looked at the form online again today, I was wrong, does not have to be terminal. But I sure thought the last time I looked that it took two docs to testify on it for a person that was in control of their senses when applying. Now I see only one doc required. But either way, I don't think any doc around here is going to sign it for a patient that is OK and doing just fine at present.

And I think hospitals do whatever they want, if a patient comes in not functioning, or becomes that way in their care. My opinion - to try avoid any possible lawsuit, they do all they can so no one can later say poor Uncle Joe did not get timely and proper treatment after arriving at their hospital - just my opinion.
I am reminded of the line in the song "It's Good News Week" (Hedgehoppers Anonymous) from the 1960s.
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Old 10-09-2014, 08:46 AM   #22
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I'm not sure that doctors would refuse to sign for patients that are currently ok. It seems rather like a standardized living will. These are the type of things to think about BEFORE you get dementia, a terminal illness, hit by a car, etc....

FWIW - the living will and patients wishes can go both ways. My parents both had directives to exclude extraordinary measures. My brother's directive was to do EVERYTHING possible. He had terminal cancer with ZERO chance of a cure but because of his wishes he had 5 or 6 major surgeries in his last weeks to debulk the tumors for "comfort"... (It had the opposite effect).

My husband and I have advanced directives written up. We're both healthy. After observing my parents and my brothers last days I know for a fact I do not want to be intubated if I have a terminal condition. Especially after my mother extubated herself and croaked out DNR!!!! when the nurse wasn't looking.
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Old 10-10-2014, 11:04 PM   #23
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On getting old:

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Old 10-11-2014, 12:43 AM   #24
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Now, that (the video) was funny.

Seeing patients exclusively in nursing homes gives me a skewed view of aging and dying. The number of medications people are on is dizzying. Then I add more to the mix.

I hope to not be one of them.


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Old 10-11-2014, 10:34 AM   #25
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http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2...etting-longer/

Not the article I mentioned earlier but...
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Correction: October 10, 2014
Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this post incorrectly described the relationship between suicide rates among those aged 65 and older and the overall suicide rate. A recent increase, not decrease, in suicide among the elderly has not significantly increased the overall suicide rate, according to Robert Anderson, chief of mortality statistics at the National Center for Health Statistics.
The important take-away from the article, however, is this:

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People who reached age 65 could look ahead to an average additional 19.3 years on the planet, an all-time high. Men could anticipate another 17.9 years, on average, and women another 20.5.
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Old 10-12-2014, 11:23 AM   #26
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This book showed up on my coffee table recently, as DW had brought it home from the library. Midpack, seeing your synopsis makes me want to read it.
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Old 10-12-2014, 05:10 PM   #27
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This book showed up on my coffee table recently, as DW had brought it home from the library. Midpack, seeing your synopsis makes me want to read it.
Hope you enjoy it. I am still waiting for my turn on the local library waiting list...might have to buy it.
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Old 10-22-2014, 03:47 PM   #28
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Excellent interview with the author on Science Friday last week:

Atul Gawande: On Being Mortal

DH and I both listened to it and I think we'll be buying the book. Since he has a chronic progressive health condition it's something we'll need to talk about often in the coming years.
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Old 10-29-2014, 06:41 PM   #29
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I finally got it from the library, and just finished reading it today.

I thought it was just excellent. It gave me insights into my real world end of life experiences (still in progress) with my parents and DW's Mom, all different.

But it also gave me welcome food for thought regarding where/how I might one day draw the line between quality of life versus quantity of life. How our society arrived at a point where medical technology has enabled too many people to lead longer but much less satisfying lives in our final years is well explored, and the "blame" for excesses goes to patients and families just as much as medical professionals.

Based on (knee jerk) comments from earlier threads, those who would categorically chalk it up to simple greed are mistaken IMO, and the book makes the case well.

A very worthwhile read long before the end IMO.
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Old 11-14-2014, 10:37 AM   #30
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What a thought provoking book.

Having dealt with end of life issues with parents and brother - I could relate to some of the things in the book.

The discussion of assisted living and nursing homes vs the desire for independence was also very thought provoking.

This has triggered a lot of discussion between DH and I on all these topics.
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Old 11-14-2014, 11:51 AM   #31
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This is all good food for thought, especially the "As recently as 1945, most deaths occurred in the home. By the 1980s, just 17 percent did."

Some of our older relatives have become what I call "professional patients". It is like that is their entire day - seeing this doctor or that doctor, getting this test or treatment. Enough to barely on live on for years in poor health being a full time patient, worried every day about their latest diagnosis and no time or energy for much else. I don't want my final years to be like that.
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:49 PM   #32
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Bumping this thread to highlight the PBS Frontline show last night that featured Dr. Gawande and some of the stories from his book. If you missed it, it's available online: Being Mortal | FRONTLINE | PBS

Very well done and adds a more personal touch to the written word (DH gave me the book for Christmas - it is excellent).

As a PS, the fact that PBS makes most shows available immediately for online viewing at no cost (and no registration) has led us to increase our contribution to our local station.
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:59 PM   #33
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The way the medical practices now divide every issue into 27 sub-issues, each with an associated 2-minute doctor visit (and bill), this could be starting to afflict a younger cohort, as well.

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This is all good food for thought, especially the "As recently as 1945, most deaths occurred in the home. By the 1980s, just 17 percent did."

Some of our older relatives have become what I call "professional patients". It is like that is their entire day - seeing this doctor or that doctor, getting this test or treatment. Enough to barely on live on for years in poor health being a full time patient, worried every day about their latest diagnosis and no time or energy for much else. I don't want my final years to be like that.
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Old 02-11-2015, 02:20 PM   #34
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Bumping this thread to highlight the PBS Frontline show last night that featured Dr. Gawande and some of the stories from his book. If you missed it, it's available online: Being Mortal | FRONTLINE | PBS

Very well done and adds a more personal touch to the written word (DH gave me the book for Christmas - it is excellent).

As a PS, the fact that PBS makes most shows available immediately for online viewing at no cost (and no registration) has led us to increase our contribution to our local station.
Even though I've read the book, I have my DVR set to record it Thur AM. Thanks for the heads up!
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:54 PM   #35
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thanks for the link am watching now
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