Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Bifocal Contact Lenses
Old 12-11-2009, 10:53 AM   #1
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 619
Bifocal Contact Lenses

Ugh. I finally got to the point where there are no less than 20 pairs of drugstore "readers" scattered all over the house. My distance vision still seems fine, but up close, fugettaboudit. So, off to the eye doc for eval. I have always had an issue with wearing glasses...not because of vanity but because I can't tolerate any weight on the bridge of my nose for an extended period. I can't even wear sunglasses without getting a major headache after a few minutes...but I digress.

I came home from the optometrist with a pair of "monovision" contacts which seemed like a good idea, but I had to surrender after 2 weeks of squinting and blur. What a letdown; it felt like defeat. Yesterday I returned to the doc and was issued a trial pair of bifocal contacts.

Now to the point of this thread: Can anyone wearing bifocal contacts please comment on your experience? I find that I can see pretty well, but almost better without them...especially distance. Reading and computer use is a challenge, with me squinting and trying to get the light just right to see. Last night I had to resort to a pair of my trusty drugstore readers because I could not see well enough to read. ARGH. I am an avid reader; this is frustrating. I want these to be a success because I can't see up close without correction, yet I seriously can't handle glasses on my nose for more than a couple of minutes at a time. :whine:

Someone tell me this will get better.
__________________

__________________
SarahW is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-11-2009, 11:14 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,031
I have worn glasses or contacts most of my life . I had pretty good luck with the mono vision until I got to a certain age then I tried the bifocal contacts and had no luck with them . I finally gave up and wore glasses which I had to take off and on . I now have mono vision implants and they are great . Have you considered lasik surgery ? A lot of my friends had great results with it .
__________________

__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 11:25 AM   #3
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
I have three pairs of gas perm monovision contact lenses (big sale), which I don't have much trouble with. I'm also interested in people's experiences with progressive contacts.

My eyes are pretty close to the same prescription and sometimes I'll wear the "near" contacts in both eyes if I plan to spend a few hours reading. Sometimes I'll wear both "far/distance" lenses for road trips when I'll be driving for long periods, or at the movies (and keep a pair of reading glasses handy).
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 11:38 AM   #4
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moemg View Post
Have you considered lasik surgery ? A lot of my friends had great results with it .
I'm a coward, Moe!! No eye surgery for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestwifeever View Post
I have three pairs of gas perm monovision contact lenses (big sale), which I don't have much trouble with. I'm also interested in people's experiences with progressive contacts.

My eyes are pretty close to the same prescription and sometimes I'll wear the "near" contacts in both eyes if I plan to spend a few hours reading. Sometimes I'll wear both "far/distance" lenses for road trips when I'll be driving for long periods, or at the movies (and keep a pair of reading glasses handy).
I believe my "issues" with monovision are mostly due to the fact that my eyes are drastically different prescriptions. I have one eye that does all the seeing, and one that's mainly a facial decoration apparently. They put the close vision correction in my weaker eye, which didn't work out.
__________________
SarahW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 12:58 PM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,878
I tried the concentric bifocals and monovision (with one contact) and mono vision works best for me. I do have to supplement the monovision with drugstore readers for small print or for fine work in my shop.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 07:44 PM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,875
I am moderately nearsighted, with astigmatism in one eye.
For me, the best compromise is rigid gas-permeable progressive contact lenses, plus a mild pair of cheaters for needlework, small fix-it jobs, or reading small print while I'm wearing the contacts. (I still have very good UNCORRECTED close-up vision, which is why I am resisting laser correction).

I have an expensive pair of progressive bifocal spectacles which I consider to be useless for close-up,although they do OK for driving and the computer. I just take them off when I'm doing close work. I don't think the prescription is to blame - I blame the teeny frames that are in style. There's simply not enough room in those teeny lenses for the 3 areas of correction (distance, middle/computer, close up) to be effective. I would like for big eyeglass lenses to come back into style.

Amethyst
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 08:19 PM   #7
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amethyst View Post
There's simply not enough room in those teeny lenses for the 3 areas of correction (distance, middle/computer, close up) to be effective. I would like for big eyeglass lenses to come back into style.
That has been my complaint for several years too. But a couple of months ago my supervisor responded to that observation by telling me that bigger glasses were just starting to come back into style. I didn't believe her, but went to check that out and found a pair of big eyeglasses that I like a lot for my trifocals. It might be time to wander through your favorite eyeglass shop and see if they have any new bigger glasses like mine did.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 08:46 PM   #8
Administrator
Janet H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 4,954
I wear one standard contact although both eyes have similar correction needs. It turns out that with a little practice - your brain learns to select the proper 'signal' for the activity. The one corrected eye allows me to read, the uncorrected eye sees distance.

I recently tried the progressive contacts as well and after spending two days feeling woozy and off balance, gave up and went back to wearing one standard lens. The Optometrists reaction to my experience was to shrug and say 'well, it was worth trying'
I am happy with the current solution and spend half as much on contacts this way
__________________
E-R.org Custom Google Search | You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. (Robin Williams)
Janet H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 12:19 AM   #9
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
That has been my complaint for several years too. But a couple of months ago my supervisor responded to that observation by telling me that bigger glasses were just starting to come back into style. I didn't believe her, but went to check that out and found a pair of big eyeglasses that I like a lot for my trifocals. It might be time to wander through your favorite eyeglass shop and see if they have any new bigger glasses like mine did.
W2R--wouldn't that make the glasses heavier? I don't know how people ever get used to that weight on the bridge of the nose. It truly makes me cranky.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
I wear one standard contact although both eyes have similar correction needs.
That sounds like something I might try, Janet. I still have the "reader" contact, so tomorrow I will just put in the one and see if that is better. (Although I did better with the bifocal lenses today.)
__________________
SarahW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 12:28 AM   #10
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahW View Post
W2R--wouldn't that make the glasses heavier? I don't know how people ever get used to that weight on the bridge of the nose. It truly makes me cranky.
I have been wearing glasses for a very long time, and have considerable astigmatism as well as nearsightedness which was worse when I was younger. So, my glasses have always been pretty thick, comparatively speaking. When I first started wearing glasses, they were not only large and thick but had glass lenses instead of the ultra-light plastic that is available today. Glasses today are very light in comparison and I do not notice them.

However I *do* notice anything that detracts from my good vision and that includes glasses that are too small. As Amethyst said,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amethyst
There's simply not enough room in those teeny lenses for the 3 areas of correction (distance, middle/computer, close up) to be effective.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 10:51 AM   #11
Administrator
Janet H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahW View Post
That sounds like something I might try, Janet. I still have the "reader" contact, so tomorrow I will just put in the one and see if that is better. (Although I did better with the bifocal lenses today.)
Try putting it in your non-dominant eye. Then close the other eye for a minute and try reading. You have to train your brain a little to select the right signal and looking through each eye independently and then switching helps.

And remember - you are taking advice from a musician... it's worth what you paid for it
__________________
E-R.org Custom Google Search | You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. (Robin Williams)
Janet H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 11:22 AM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,875
SarahW,
We're all different in what we can tolerate, but glasses nowadays are much lighter weight than even a few years ago. I remember loathing the heavy feel of my glasses during my teen years, and the red mark they made on my nose. Modern, thin "featherweight" lenses and titanium frames are a fraction of the weight, though they are also pricey.

Janet,
Something else I just remembered: A slightly too-strong prescription can create headache and nausea. At the doctor's office, I tend to pick slightly too-strong correction, and the doctor reminds me that everything, at my age,* is a compromise: Strong distance correction always means less-than-perfect close-up correction, and vice versa.

Amethyst

*Oh, that hated phrase! I've only been hearing it for a couple years; guess the best I can hope for is to keep hearing it for many years!
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 11:35 AM   #13
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,846
I just weighed my new, "big" glasses on my kitchen digital food scale, and they weigh 1.0 ounce. I never specify the featherweight lenses (since I don't care), but almost always I am told that they are all that is available in the style I have selected so I get them anyway. Even though they go through the formality of asking whether you want them or not, I think that is about all they sell any more. I don't remember if these glasses have them or not, to be honest. The frames are bronze colored metal but nothing unusual.

The lenses are 2 1/4" wide, and 1 3/4" high. This is big enough to allow plenty of room for the trifocals, in my opinion.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 11:41 AM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: No. California
Posts: 1,600
Before I had lasix surgery, I was wearing bi-focal contacts that worked wonderfully well.
They were the contacts that had rings like a target. One ring was far vision, the next was near vision. When I put them on, I didn't have a moment of blurred vision or all the other symptoms one can get with new glasses or contacts. I was nearsighted and have astigmatism also.

If they still make that type of contact, maybe your eye provider can advise you about them.
__________________
KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 11:53 AM   #15
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,846
My eye care provider didn't like the bifocal contacts for me, and wanted to try the method of having different prescriptions in each eye. But first, he wanted me to get used to the contacts and to use reading glasses. I was surprised to find that I was happy with that arrangement because my field of vision was so much larger, and who wants closeup vision in the periphery? Distance vision was fine there.

Want to hear my sob story about contacts? I went to get them again in 2004, having worn them back in the 1980's. I love soft contacts so I adjusted to them well, and was wearing them 16 hours a day with no adverse symptoms that I could tell, and never saw better. But my blankety-blank eye care provider decided that I had "overwearing syndrome" and wouldn't allow me to continue with them!! Plus, he felt that they didn't adequately handle my astigmatism, as I recall. I didn't care!! I NEVER saw better since I was a kid. But oh well. I was so mad at him.

So, much to my GREAT distress he took them away and put me on oxygen permeable hard lenses specifically for astigmatism. I barely got adjusted to them, and never could wear them a very long time. I also had a dreadful time getting them on and off. Finally he said they were fine and my regular visits with him ended. Shortly thereafter I got a bad case of the flu and couldn't wear them at all for two weeks. I couldn't get adjusted to them again. So I wear trifocal glasses. Like many, I refuse to consider lasix surgery and will never consent to it.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 02:11 PM   #16
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I just weighed my new, "big" glasses on my kitchen digital food scale, and they weigh 1.0 ounce. I never specify the featherweight lenses (since I don't care), but almost always I am told that they are all that is available in the style I have selected so I get them anyway.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amethyst View Post
SarahW,
We're all different in what we can tolerate, but glasses nowadays are much lighter weight than even a few years ago.
You know, when I was at the eye doctor I was struck by the walls of similar-looking eyeglass styles. It seemed like they all looked EXACTLY the same...no matter the brand. I even mentioned it to the eyeglass fitter person while I was wasting time in the waiting area. I can't imagine why they would carry so many "designs" that are the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KB View Post
Before I had lasix surgery, I was wearing bi-focal contacts that worked wonderfully well.
They were the contacts that had rings like a target. One ring was far vision, the next was near vision. When I put them on, I didn't have a moment of blurred vision or all the other symptoms one can get with new glasses or contacts. I was nearsighted and have astigmatism also.

If they still make that type of contact, maybe your eye provider can advise you about them.
KB--the "target" contacts are what I'm wearing now. Today they seem MUCH better, so it seems that they will work for me after all. I'm having much better success with these than I did with the monovision.

Isn't it wonderful that we have so many choices?? I was thinking earlier that if I had lived a century ago, I'd likely not have any vision correction available to me at all. (Or at least, very limited eyeglasses.)
__________________
SarahW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2009, 04:02 PM   #17
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 199
I too can not wear glasses and I am also farsighted. After trying both kinds of contacts ( bifocal and mono) I've found mono to be the best for me. My right eye is my reading eye and left for distance. Originally it was reversed but I had trouble seeing the yellow line in the road with the "reading eye".
__________________

__________________
Dancer373 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Multifocal contact lenses: the presbyopian cure? Nords Health and Early Retirement 36 04-20-2010 12:13 PM
How To Contact Hotmail? kaneohe Other topics 2 08-17-2008 11:46 AM
Bifocal Contact Lenses? travelover Health and Early Retirement 11 06-28-2007 12:26 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:20 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.