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Old 07-08-2009, 06:34 PM   #21
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First of all, there are error bars on the lab test. So the 101 reading might have been 99 (or lower). Even for a diabetes diagnosis, you need to have two fasting readings greater than 125. If you are concerned, I would recommend having a glucose tolerance test done. An HbA1c is good, but it is just an average of your blood sugar over the past 90 days, and someone could be diabetic and be having lows which will pull down the average. IMO, the best test, if you really want to know, is a glucose tolerance test. It's more expensive than an A1c, but can be used for diagnosis. They give you a known amount of fast-acting carbs, then measure your blood sugar every 15 minutes for two or three hours, to see if your blood sugar spikes, and how long it takes to come back down. This will tell you if you are insulin resistant, or becoming so. As I said in an earlier post, by the time the fasting number reaches the diabetic level of 126, you have probably been diabetic for a while. I believe if your blood sugar spikes over 180 on a glucose tolerance test, you are diabetic.

BTW, you can buy a cheap meter at Walmart for about $8 and some strips and do your own testing. No prescription is needed. Then you can do your own glucose tolerance test.
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Old 07-08-2009, 06:48 PM   #22
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I had a 101 or 102 on my fasting glucose test for my annual physical back in Feb. Doctors here are still using 110 as the baseline for pre-diabetes (Japan), but I knew the baseline was lower in the US. My cholesterol had also spiked...LDL was up, and HDL was down. HbA1C was still in the same range as usual. Since I was ill last year with another condition, I have been having the docs take a test every 2-3 months just to be sure about a couple of things, so I knew that all of these figures were out of my normal range.

When I went in for a test about 5-6 weeks later (my usual doc), I had him test things again. Cholesterol was back to my normal range, blood glucose was back to 93, in line with the narrow 91-93 range is has been in for a few years.

...and, I did get one of those cheap meters, and test on a saturday morning between doc's blood tests. It has been 91 every time.

I'm just wondering, what can cause spikes like this? I can't remember eating anything the night before, or even for a few days before, that was outside my normal eating patterns. I was happy that this was just a spike, but in the next couple of years I will be shopping for private health insurance, and I really don't need a spike on the day I take my blood test for that!

R
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Old 07-08-2009, 07:19 PM   #23
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I have a "family history" of Type II diabetes (one sibling, very obese and inactive). Parents never showed any signs of it.

I am in the mid-range for BMI (21.8), so, I am neither fat nor thin. Despite a sedentary job, I keep active and fit. My diet is pretty healthy. I neither avoid carbs, nor gobble them. But, I do have episodes of sudden energy level drops (especially when starting to work out in the morning - sometimes I start shaking and can't go on until I eat something). Also, I do get up in the night more than once, which I don't like. Oddly, the less I eat, the more I have to go.

Given that glucose tolerance tests are expensive and (I've heard) highly unpleasant, is it worth alerting my doctor to my symptoms? I'm sure he'll prescribe a test, since he is a conscientious doctor.
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Old 07-08-2009, 09:27 PM   #24
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We rarely do glucose tolerance tests any more, except some pregnant women. It doesn't add to the fasting glucose level, esp when the latter is combined with glycohemoglobin. The WHO criteria still use it as one option, but the American Diabetes Assoc no longer recommends it. While not harmful it is cumbersome and doesn't help patients compared to the alternatives.

True hypoglycemia was once quite the rage for a wide variety of symptoms, but it is not common. "Functional" hypoglycemia is temporary drops in glucose levels, often entirely within the normal range and what you feel is your body producing glucagon and other chemicals in an effort to keep it high - those things cause the shakiness most people describe.
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As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rs0460a View Post
Since I've "managed my condition" since being diagnosed 5 years ago, I attribute my "success" primarly to three things:

- Diet (control those carbs!)
- Exercise (helps keep glucose down)
- Stress reduction (you would be surprised how stress impacts glucose!)

- Ron
Good job on the Diabetes management Your solution is exactly what the N.American lifestyle lacks and thus the epidemic of type2 Diabetes.
Fat,Lazy,complacent lifestyle is a sure bet to develop Diabetes.
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Old 07-10-2009, 11:23 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_in_Tampa View Post
We rarely do glucose tolerance tests any more, except some pregnant women. It doesn't add to the fasting glucose level, esp when the latter is combined with glycohemoglobin. The WHO criteria still use it as one option, but the American Diabetes Assoc no longer recommends it. While not harmful it is cumbersome and doesn't help patients compared to the alternatives.
If this is the case, I would pay more attention to the recommendations of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists than the American Diabetes Association. The AACE recommends that people with pre-diabetes have a glucose tolerance test annually.

New AACE Guidelines for Pre-diabetes Management

IMO, the AACE has been more on top of the whole diabetes issue than the ADA.
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Old 07-10-2009, 01:26 PM   #27
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Fat,Lazy,complacent lifestyle is a sure bet to develop Diabetes.
I'm sure you are aware of the fact that a lot of overweight people never become diabetic. It's my understanding that you have to be genetically predisposed. If you have the gene, being overweight can hasten the onset of the disease, but it is not a cause in and of itself.
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