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Old 02-08-2016, 12:51 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by bizlady View Post
Is there a website that compares coverage to all the options? I understand policy coverage is the same for the same type of policy, but how do we learn about a supplement vs medigap for example. We are a still a few years out, but it seems the learning curve on this to get educated for choices is huge!
I've been looking at the actual Medicare site, which has been surprisingly helpful and organized! It is indeed a huge task to educate yourself on...hard to make myself do it this far out (age 48), but, I am really trying to be as sure as I can that our projections for our portfolio to survive are as accurate as possible.

https://www.medicare.gov/sign-up-cha...#collapse-5313
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Old 02-08-2016, 01:34 PM   #42
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The problem of narrow networks affects medicare advantage plans. However in the case of traditional medicare almost all hospitals take it (because folks over 65 are their biggest customers). In addition the question of physicians and taking medicare is much clearer and more easy to frame than the problems folks have with networks.
True but I think one benefit to Kaiser's closed network is you clearly know if you're in-network or out of network. If you go anywhere outside Kaiser, it's automatically out of network. Kaiser covers emergency services (even international) at in-network rates. All others, you're on your own.
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Old 02-08-2016, 01:48 PM   #43
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My state's "dept of aging" has a great service which describes the differences in plans very well. In addition, it lists all the companies approved for their Medicare plans and their individual costs at ages under 64, 65 and every 5 year increment thereafter up to age 85. Many are fairly competitive at age 65 but digress as ages increase.
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Old 02-08-2016, 02:43 PM   #44
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Can one have a Medigap policy one year, drop it for a year or more, then decide to have one again? (I ask because it is possible that we stay out of the country for a whole year, particularly the year I lose my retiree insurance and my wife is not yet eligible for Medicare).
Alan, I was surfing for other Medicare stuff, and ended up finding this page, which I think may prove helpful to you. Sounds like it could be tricky to lose coverage and then try to pick it up again.

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...otections.aspx

And, on a different note, I found this information about how Medigap policies price their rates and how to shop for them quite interesting. Sharing for anyone who may find it helpful.

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...-policies.aspx
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(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
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Old 02-08-2016, 03:07 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by simple girl View Post
Alan, I was surfing for other Medicare stuff, and ended up finding this page, which I think may prove helpful to you. Sounds like it could be tricky to lose coverage and then try to pick it up again.

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...otections.aspx

And, on a different note, I found this information about how Medigap policies price their rates and how to shop for them quite interesting. Sharing for anyone who may find it helpful.

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...-policies.aspx
Thanks for the links, and your earlier replies. It looks like I'll have to budget for Medigap or other supplemental insurance even for years when we are not even in the country.
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Old 02-13-2016, 01:44 AM   #46
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Does anyone here actually have a Part G plan? How stringent are the criteria for getting onto it? Do they require an actual medical exam?

I was planning on a Part F plan (turn 65 in October) but if I could get onto G it might solve the problem of F being closed.

For the OP: I would advise against a Medicare Advantage plan because 1) it's basically an HMO with narrow provider and hospital panels and 2) several insurers have stopped offering them due to lack of profits.


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Old 02-13-2016, 07:20 AM   #47
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Does anyone here actually have a Part G plan? How stringent are the criteria for getting onto it? Do they require an actual medical exam?

I was planning on a Part F plan (turn 65 in October) but if I could get onto G it might solve the problem of F being closed.
All Medigap plans are guaranteed issue during your Medigap initial enrollment period. The initial enrollment period is when you first become eligible to enroll, usually when you turn 65.

It is after the initial enrollment period has expired and you qualify for a SEP that Plan F is guaranteed issue and G is not.

The medical underwriting comes when your initial enrollment period has expired, you don't qualify for a SEP, and you want to change Medigap plans. An independent health insurance agent specializing in Medigap can let you know the ones which are more lenient, but they usually ask if you are on dialysis, have any upcoming surgeries, or had any major surgery during the past few years.

Some states, like NY, are year round guaranteed issue. Other states, like CA, allow you to downgrade or move to a different insurer with the same plan letter around your birthday.
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Old 02-13-2016, 08:10 AM   #48
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It is after the initial enrollment period has expired and you qualify for a SEP that Plan F is guaranteed issue and G is not.

The medical underwriting comes when your initial enrollment period has expired, you don't qualify for a SEP, and you want to change Medigap plans.
What does SEP stand for?

Sounds like one needs to research Medigap plans very closely and choose wisely at age 65 as changing plans later on could be difficult, if not impossible depending on your health status and state you live in...correct?
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(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
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Old 02-13-2016, 09:40 AM   #49
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What does SEP stand for?

Sounds like one needs to research Medigap plans very closely and choose wisely at age 65 as changing plans later on could be difficult, if not impossible depending on your health status and state you live in...correct?
Special Enrollment Period.

Certain situations, such as your Medigap plan no longer being offered, create a Special Enrollment Period where you have guaranteed issue rights to some, but not all, of the Medigap Plan letters. In this situation, you can apply for Plan G but they do not have to accept you since G does not carry guaranteed issue rights. G will replace F on the guaranteed issue list in 2020.

List of SEP situations that create guaranteed issue rights to Medigap: https://www.medicare.gov/supplement-...scenarios.html

There is no annual open enrollment for Medigap at the federal level like there is for Medicare Advantage and Part D. So, in most states, it is important to choose a Medigap that not only offers low rates at age 65 but still has competitive rates at age 80 in case medical issues arise which prevent you from switching in the future.
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