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Old 11-19-2013, 11:39 AM   #41
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Again, thank you all for relaying your and your friends' experiences with mono (near & far) as well as multi focal lenses. My doc says I'm a good candidate for either direction and it's just deciding what I want to do.

I have a call in to my optometrist to see about test driving both mono (in my bad eye only to simulate one near & one far) as well as multi focal contact lenses for a couple of months. I realize I won't have the best vision because of the cataract, but it should be close and with the multis, should provide a worst case night vision experience I think. I also talked last week to a former coworker who wears contacts and tried the one near/one far route for a year and absolutely hated it and now wears multi focal contacts and loves them. Decisions, decisions.
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Old 11-28-2013, 02:31 AM   #42
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I also had not done eye surgery. But my mom had a cataract surgury.She is a healthy 55 year old who has worn glasses since age 40 and have never had problems with eyes until she was told she had cataracts. Surgery was done on both eyes about 10 days apart 6 weeks ago. Result so far is problematical. Despite taking eye drops for dryness as prescribed, both eyes continue to burn and itch after reading for about 20 minutes or watching TV. Also have extreme sensitivity to sun light or bright rooms. She now wears double sun glasses outside and single sun glasses inside. Doctor says all is normal and will see her next march.
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Old 11-29-2013, 12:10 AM   #43
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I also had not done eye surgery. But my mom had a cataract surgury.She is a healthy 55 year old who has worn glasses since age 40 and have never had problems with eyes until she was told she had cataracts. Surgery was done on both eyes about 10 days apart 6 weeks ago. Result so far is problematical. Despite taking eye drops for dryness as prescribed, both eyes continue to burn and itch after reading for about 20 minutes or watching TV. Also have extreme sensitivity to sun light or bright rooms. She now wears double sun glasses outside and single sun glasses inside. Doctor says all is normal and will see her next march.
What type of lenses were implanted? I have heard of the extreme sun light sensitivity with accommodative lenses (Crystalens). Neither my doc nor the clinic, will implant these lenses any more due to the problems their patients have experienced.
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Old 11-30-2013, 05:55 PM   #44
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[QUOTE=JacquelineKimura;1384796] Despite taking eye drops for dryness as prescribed, both eyes continue to burn and itch after reading for about 20 minutes or watching TV. QUOTE]

Dry eyes -

I had elective Cataract surgery because my dry eye problem prevented me from wearing contacts. During one of the follow up appointments with the eye doc, I mentioned my dry eye pain and he said take fish oil. I have been taking fish oil for years, but apparently I was not taking enough. I now take enough fish oil daily to prevent all irritation.

I have been using Carlson's lemon fish oil. The doc recommended PRN DE Omega Benefits Fish Oil. The suggested dosing is 4 per day, but I need to take 6. Also, buying direct from PRN is much cheaper than this price on Amazon.

Amazon.com: Physician Recommended Nutriceuticals PRN Omega Benefits Fish Oil 120 Softgels: Health & Personal Care
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Old 11-30-2013, 07:51 PM   #45
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I also had not done eye surgery. But my mom had a cataract surgury.She is a healthy 55 year old who has worn glasses since age 40 and have never had problems with eyes until she was told she had cataracts. Surgery was done on both eyes about 10 days apart 6 weeks ago. Result so far is problematical. Despite taking eye drops for dryness as prescribed, both eyes continue to burn and itch after reading for about 20 minutes or watching TV. Also have extreme sensitivity to sun light or bright rooms. She now wears double sun glasses outside and single sun glasses inside. Doctor says all is normal and will see her next march.
My late FIL had similar problems after cataract surgery. He was in his 80's and had never worn glasses. It turned out that he was allergic to the prescription eye drops. Doc prescribed a different eye drop and he was soon OK. Incidentally, FIL had a type "A" personality and demanded that Doc do something immediately.
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Old 11-30-2013, 07:57 PM   #46
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Also had cataract surgery, and doc gave similar recommendation, but also suggested Flaxseed oil as option if you have issue with fish, or prefer it.
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Old 01-24-2014, 04:40 PM   #47
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bumping this older thread..

Just scheduled cataract surgery consultation in a couple of weeks.. the cataract in my right eye is on the move and growing larger. Correction to 20/40 in September and 4 months later it's slid to 20/60. Left eye is almost there but I will talk them into doing both. I'm 62 and retired 12/31...welcome to my first 'retirement surprise'....

Having read this thread, it seems that the mono lenses are a safer bet than the multi. I have no problem using readers since I've worn glasses since I was 9.

My optometrist (whom I like a lot) says the industry is another generation or two away from a superior multi lens and he's highly recommend the monos.
Even though I like him a lot, I did get a second opinion from an ophthamologist who confirmed the cataract. Since, at that time I thought I was a year or two away from getting them done, we didn't discuss lenses.

Any new thoughts on which way to go? Thanks advance for replies...
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:02 PM   #48
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Uncanny timing for resurrection of this thread as I've been debating back and forth...multi vs. mono vs. multi vs.........In the meantime, the vision in my right eye has deteriorated more to the point where I am now having trouble with daytime driving in my neighborhood. And reading in anything but bright light is just about impossible now.

Even though I'm a risk taker, I decided just the other day that the multis have simply not been around long enough for my comfort. I've decided to go with the monos. I would still like to toss my glasses and am going to go with a farsighted mono lens in the bad eye and when the other eye's cataract grows, will go with a nearsighted lens in that eye, allowing me to hopefully toss my glasses most of the time. Unfortunately, I'm left eye dominant and that eye should have the far sighted lens implanted. I will be doing it backwards and the odds are not with me. Worst case is I'll still be wearing glasses until the left eye goes bad and I have another far sighted lens implanted, thereby needing readers only. On the other hand, I could have both eyes done now (couple of weeks apart) the 'right' way, but then what if I can't get used to it.

Decisions, decisions... That's the problem when you have too many options.
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:15 PM   #49
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It's a tough decision, alright.
I had both eyes done about a year ago -- one in February and one in March.

I found it interesting that my ophthalmologist, who did the surgery, recommended against the multifocal lenses even though it would have been far more profit for him.

The only remaining question was whether to go strictly distance, strictly near, or one eye distance and one eye near focus. I was really wavering about this.

Again, my doc's comment was that the one and one (distance/near) combination seemed to work well for people who were already comfortable with that combination of contact lenses. But he said that he had tried that contact combination himself at one time and could never get used to it. He gave it a decent try (about four months), but he quit due to his brain's inability to accommodate.

I've been extremely nearsighted all my life, so I decided on both eyes set for distance. It has been nearly a year now, and I'm very happy with my decision. Being able to see my surroundings clearly immediately on waking in the morning had always been foreign to me, and I absolutely love it.

The slight nuisance of having to grab a pair of reading glasses (which now reside permanently in my shirt pocket) from time to time is so minor that it really doesn't bother me.

OTOH, I know several people who got the one and one combination and seem perfectly happy with it.

Bottom line: there is no universal answer.
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:32 PM   #50
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It's a tough decision, alright.
I had both eyes done about a year ago -- one in February and one in March.

I found it interesting that my ophthalmologist, who did the surgery, recommended against the multifocal lenses even though it would have been far more profit for him.

The only remaining question was whether to go strictly distance, strictly near, or one eye distance and one eye near focus. I was really wavering about this.

Again, my doc's comment was that the one and one (distance/near) combination seemed to work well for people who were already comfortable with that combination of contact lenses. But he said that he had tried that contact combination himself at one time and could never get used to it. He gave it a decent try (about four months), but he quit due to his brain's inability to accommodate.

I've been extremely nearsighted all my life, so I decided on both eyes set for distance. It has been nearly a year now, and I'm very happy with my decision. Being able to see my surroundings clearly immediately on waking in the morning had always been foreign to me, and I absolutely love it.

The slight nuisance of having to grab a pair of reading glasses (which now reside permanently in my shirt pocket) from time to time is so minor that it really doesn't bother me.

OTOH, I know several people who got the one and one combination and seem perfectly happy with it.

Bottom line: there is no universal answer.
Thanks, Brau, this helps in making my decision. Your post confirms that my one near/one far makes sense even though I will be doing it backwards. If it doesn't work, I have the option of going all far, which is preferable to continuing with the all near. My second option, of one near/one far with the correct dominant eye would not allow for do-overs so I would be stuck with that decision even if it did not work out.
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Old 01-25-2014, 10:16 AM   #51
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I had a lens implant in 1995. It corrected my vision to 20/30. Then in 2000, I had the other (right) lens done, this time correcting to 20/20. Because I had always had monovision contacts, I adjusted immediately. In 2007, the right cataract had regrown and I had outpatient laser surgery to remove it.

Now for my question: The 1995 surgery used an unfolded lens whereas the 2000 surgery was done with a foldable lens. Now the 2 lower brackets that hold the lens in place have come loose. This causes me to see the upper edge of the lens at night (or looking up during the day). This is very irritating considering that I have been problem-free for 18 years.

Has anyone had experience with this problem and what are the possible remedies? Thanks.
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Old 01-25-2014, 04:49 PM   #52
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I'm afraid I don't have anything to add except empathy, and that it is most surprising that an artificial implanted lens can develop a cataract. I did think a cataract is a thickening of the biological lens.

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I had a lens implant in 1995. It corrected my vision to 20/30. Then in 2000, I had the other (right) lens done, this time correcting to 20/20. Because I had always had monovision contacts, I adjusted immediately. In 2007, the right cataract had regrown and I had outpatient laser surgery to remove it.
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Old 01-25-2014, 05:14 PM   #53
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I had cataract surgery ten years ago and many of my friends have had it . All have had monovision without any problems adjusting .The only problem I had was they did my first eye in January and the second three months later . During that time I had my newly done eye for distance and my regular nearsighted eye .The difference was too extreme and it actually made me nauseated .The minute the other implant was in I was fine and adjusted immediately . I love not wearing glasses and buying cheap sunglasses .
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:32 AM   #54
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I'm afraid I don't have anything to add except empathy, and that it is most surprising that an artificial implanted lens can develop a cataract. I did think a cataract is a thickening of the biological lens.

Amethyst
The original cataract grows on the original lens, bonding to it. The regrowth cannot bond to the plastic lens so the laser surgery just cuts it back out of the way and it falls harmlessly inside the eye. It is a 10 minute outpatient procedure.
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:54 AM   #55
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Oh, OK, I thought the cataract-y biological lens had to be removed and replaced with the synthetic lens. I didn't know they left the real one in there.
Aha! Here is the relevant info, from Wikipedia:
"Some people can develop a posterior capsular opacification (PCO, also called an after-cataract). As a physiological change expected after cataract surgery, the posterior capsular cells undergo hyperplasia and cellular migration, showing up as a thickening, opacification and clouding of the posterior lens capsule (which is left behind when the cataract was removed, for placement of the IOL). This may compromise visual acuity and the ophthalmologist can use a device to correct this situation. It can be safely and painlessly corrected using a laser device to make small holes in the posterior lens capsule of the crystalline. It usually is a quick outpatient procedure that uses a Nd-YAG laser (neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet) to disrupt and clear the central portion of the opacified posterior lens capsule (posterior capsulotomy). This creates a clear central visual axis for improving visual acuity.[19] In very thick opacified posterior capsules, a surgical (manual) capsulectomy is the surgical procedure performed. A YAG capsulotomy is, however, a factor which must be taken in consideration in the event of IOL replacement as vitreous can migrate toward the anterior chamber through the opening hitherto occluded by the IOL."

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The original cataract grows on the original lens, bonding to it. The regrowth cannot bond to the plastic lens so the laser surgery just cuts it back out of the way and it falls harmlessly inside the eye. It is a 10 minute outpatient procedure.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:26 PM   #56
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ok, bumping again...

Just got back from initial cataract consultation with the opthamologist (eyes are still dilated).. She said I was a good candidate for the multi lens at 2k an eye and not covered by insurance.... the standard mono lens is taken care of by insurance after deductible is met... although I liked her a lot, it did sound a teeny bit like a sales pitch.

Anyway, I'm back there on the 18th for measurements and to make the decision about the lens. She said they (not sure who 'they' are) would offer the multi lenses at that time and I could go that way or turn them down in favor of the mono distance lens, so I'm guessing the real sales pitch is coming. We didn't discuss going with one far/one near like later posts on this thread brought up, so I guess I'll discuss that at the next consultation.

At this point for me, looks like the standard mono lenses are the tried and true way to go. Readers won't bother me a bit since I've worn glasses pretty much for 55 years.

Of course, tough decisions can go back and forth like a windshield wiper until it comes down to crunch time.
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Old 02-11-2014, 03:37 PM   #57
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ok, bumping again...

Just got back from initial cataract consultation with the opthamologist (eyes are still dilated).. She said I was a good candidate for the multi lens at 2k an eye and not covered by insurance.... the standard mono lens is taken care of by insurance after deductible is met... although I liked her a lot, it did sound a teeny bit like a sales pitch.

Anyway, I'm back there on the 18th for measurements and to make the decision about the lens. She said they (not sure who 'they' are) would offer the multi lenses at that time and I could go that way or turn them down in favor of the mono distance lens, so I'm guessing the real sales pitch is coming. We didn't discuss going with one far/one near like later posts on this thread brought up, so I guess I'll discuss that at the next consultation.

At this point for me, looks like the standard mono lenses are the tried and true way to go. Readers won't bother me a bit since I've worn glasses pretty much for 55 years.

Of course, tough decisions can go back and forth like a windshield wiper until it comes down to crunch time.
Just got back from my measurements appt, and wouldn't you know it, my astigmatism is worse than was visible to the dr. and I'm NOT a good candidate for the multis after all...why, oh why, didn't I make the measurements appt sooner...I would have my 'bionic' eye by now .

The technician stated that the measurement appt also lets the dr. know if there are issues with certain lenses. It assists the dr. and you in making the final decision as to which lenses are best for you. In my case, toric far for my bad eye. This leaves me with slight nearsighted in my left eye. Dr. says my brain should have no problem with the near/far combination, but if it does, I'll go with all far when the right one goes bad.

Good luck with your decision.
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:09 PM   #58
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I have the near / far combination and haven't had any problems. After all, your brain also inverts the image which is much more complex.
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Old 02-17-2014, 02:46 PM   #59
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I have the near / far combination and haven't had any problems. After all, your brain also inverts the image which is much more complex.
Is your far in your dominant eye? This may be my problem in that I'm left eye dominant, however, the far is not going there. My former optometrist states most people who do this (backwards) cannot make the adjustment.

My surgery is set for the end of March and I'm going with the 'backwards' near/far combo, hoping I'll adjust. Time will tell.
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Old 02-21-2014, 09:45 AM   #60
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I had both eyes done last winter at a hospital in Vermont. When I inquired about the multifocal lenses the doctor said that the opthalmology department there strongly recommended against them. He said they did a very nice business replacing multifocal lenses that had been done elsewhere with monofocals. I took their advice and went with the lenses that are optimized for distance. I have to wear reading glasses but that is no big deal for me. I can't believe how much better I can see while driving, particularly at night. I can read road signs! I can read the crawler with the college basketball scores at the bottom of my TV screen!
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