Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-13-2015, 04:41 PM   #61
Full time employment: Posting here.
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 690
L?
Anyway, since the topic is refreshed, here is a recent post on the subject of "too much exercise" by exercise physiologist, researcher Michael J Joyner MD -

Quote:
I am in the camp that 30-60 minutes of physical activity most days is the sweet spot for general health and that more is not better, but it is not worse either.
Too Much, Too Much Exercise? | Human Limits: Michael J. Joyner, M.D.
__________________

__________________
How's it going to end..............
bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-13-2015, 05:37 PM   #62
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 4,792
Tough exercise just for the sake of it never did any rewarding feeling for me. Doing things that require expending huge energy for producing something tangible or purposeful is great reward.

Example: I built a bridge, involved logging dragging huge power poles, cutting hauling trees for cross ties, cutting 2x6es with hand held chainsaw out of logs is difficult, dangerous and physically demanding. The dog tired feeling afterwards and the mental elation is priceless. AND results in something useful, practical and will be around for others to use long after I am reduced to dust.

Another one: I figure skate. Learning at 62 involved lots of effort, many falls. As I got better learning moves beyond just scooting along is also physically demanding and involves more falls.... Getting up after falls is good workout, I am lifting 175 lb off the ice each get up. Multiply by a dozen or times adds up to some good weight lifting. Learning to be graceful in doing moves is more great effort. Again it is workout with results, great fun, lots of muscle work with elegant results. Now near 68 I still like my system.
__________________

__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Biking....my 2 cents.
Old 08-13-2015, 08:13 PM   #63
Recycles dryer sheets
REattempt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 280
Biking....my 2 cents.

T-Al,

I hope this will help you, it has been a long journey for me to learn long distance riding. For reference, I'm 50 and used to ride my bike in college and did triathlons. The last real ride was 1989, so 27 years ago. I had only once ridden a distance longer than 25 miles.

For a variety of reasons, including some significant health issues, I decided in December to start riding again, primarily to lose weight. I weighed 230 pounds on 6'1" frame. My BMI was over 30...OBESE.

I started indoors on the trainer in the winter, then transitioned to outdoor. It was tough to finish 17 miles with 2-300 feet of vertical climbing. Sometimes I even had to stop and walk on hills. By June 1, I was up to 75 miles a week and my weight was down to 210. I also changed my eating habits. But by June, I was the same as you, I felt "Beat Up" after a 30 mile ride.

So I got a coach, a professional cycling coach, and here are the things I've learned:
  1. Unless you are going to ride specifically to lose fat (riding in zone 2 (power or HR)), preload with carbs. Eat some carbs, 2-400 calories of high GI carbs 2-4 hours before the ride. If you know you are going for a long ride, you can start "topping off" your glycogen about 48 hours in advance by raising the amount of carbs you consume.
  2. You should consume at least 50% of the calories that you burn while you are riding, primarily in the form of carbohydrates. This may be antithetical to your normal eating pattern, but, depending on your age and level of fitness, you likely have around 1500 AVAILABLE calories of stored glycogen in your leg muscles. If you don't replenish some portion of that, you will feel the pain. You can use gatorade G (not G2) or some other sports drink if your stomach can take it. I use SKRATCH (google it). A powdered mix specifically for endurance cycling. For a 50 mile ride (I take about 3 hours and burn around 2000 calories), I drink at least 4, 24 ounce bottles of skratch, or about 480 calories in skratch alone (I have 4 bottle cages on my bike), then another 500 or so calories in bananas, dried fruit, fig newtons or cliff bars. Whatever your stomach likes. For longer and/or slower rides, particluarly in HEAT, you can and should take more of your calories in fluid form.
  3. Within 30 minutes AFTER the ride (preferable within 15 minutes), you should consume anywhere from 2-500 calories of HIGH GI Carbohydrates along with some form of readily digestible protein. The muscles are especially capable of accepting protien and glycogen in the time period...like 3-5x more than the next 24 hours. I put Whey Protein Isolate in Apple Cider for my after ride shake.
  4. Elevate your legs for 15 minutes when you get home. This speeds recovery.
  5. The Coaching company has a nutritionist, she recommended that I eat at least 1g protien for every lb. of lean body mass. I had a Dexafit, which put my lean body mass at 143 lbs. So I eat at least 140 grams of protien a day. This seems to have helped a bunch.
  6. Drink lots of water in general, but continue to hydrate after your ride.

I now ride right around 175 miles per week with group rides, High Intensity Interval Training and endurance rides specifically for teaching my body to burn fat. Typically two of my rides per week are over 50 miles. I can easily ride 50 miles with 3000 feet of vertical climbs in under 3 hours (and I power up the climbs now...amazing change).

My weight is down to 189, which is 2 lbs over my high school weight, and my BMI is down to "Normal" (<25). ALL of my medical issues are gone. My resting heart rate went from 82 to 56. My BP is down to 110/60. From December, I raised my VO2MAX from below 38 to 45 ml/kg/min, putting my in the "excellent" category for my age. Needless to say I feel great. I am a believer in long "hard" exercise. I put hard in quotes because it is not really "hard," just a bit of stretch for me. The kicker is that even with all of this, I ride with a 72 year old gent that regularly kicks my butt! If you saw him you wouldn't believe he is 72.

More importantly to this thread, my recovery time has diminished to 24 hours. Before the coach and the eating changes, I would be in pain for days. Now, I'm good to go the next day and can go harder.

If you want some references for my recommendations, let me know....

REAttempt
__________________
FIREd at 46, 8/31/11
REattempt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 08:58 PM   #64
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Plantsville
Posts: 27
I was picked on in high school because I was skinny. My motivation for exercising all these years has been those moments. I forgave but did not forget.

So now I look okay for a 58 year old guy. Every push up is a middle finger to the assho$es in high school.

Do I sound bitter?

So what was the question?
__________________
Greathusky74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 09:29 PM   #65
Recycles dryer sheets
REattempt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjorn2bwild View Post
L?
Anyway, since the topic is refreshed, here is a recent post on the subject of "too much exercise" by exercise physiologist, researcher Michael J Joyner MD -

Too Much, Too Much Exercise? | Human Limits: Michael J. Joyner, M.D.
Read a bit on this blog....especially this:

Fitness & Mortality Update | Human Limits: Michael J. Joyner, M.D.

Highest level of fitness (tough exercise) actually reduces mortality from cancer and cardiovascular issues...

I'm going to keep riding!
__________________
FIREd at 46, 8/31/11
REattempt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 10:00 PM   #66
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,983
I LOVE my bike. DH got it for my 49th birthday in 2001. I started doing longer distances in charity rides and now I like the 35-mile runs. I'm worn out after that distance but don't feel like I'm gonna die. My carbs of choice on a ride are GU packs. The Chocolate Outrage flavor tastes like hot fudge. I still feel 12 years old when I speed off in my bike!
__________________
athena53 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 10:45 PM   #67
Recycles dryer sheets
Avalon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 424
I've gotten fond of the gels on distance rides as well. My intake routine changes quite a bit on longer rides compared to daily 'around town' rides.
__________________

...open up your mind and see like me...
Avalon is offline   Reply With Quote
Does Really Tough Exercise Make You Feel Younger?
Old 08-14-2015, 09:46 AM   #68
Recycles dryer sheets
fidler4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 207
Does Really Tough Exercise Make You Feel Younger?

Here is a video presentation on dietary needs of cylists from a nutritionist at the Univ. of San Francisco. It is about 50 mins long but is a good presentation for cyclists at all levels. The presentation starts at 5:41 after the introductions.

http://youtu.be/eeIA261_gSw
__________________
fidler4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 08:46 AM   #69
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,136
@REattempt: I am impressed. Good for you. I don't bike as much as you. Maybe 1-2 times a week. 25-35 miles. Other days spinning or elliptical. 65 years old resting HR and O2 uptake similar to yours.

Have you considered organized bike trips? Would be a great way to use your new found abilities and meet like minded people. We take 1-2 each year mostly to Europe but also California and Canadian Rockies. Cheers
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 01:06 PM   #70
Full time employment: Posting here.
CaliforniaMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: San Diego
Posts: 846
I think it must depend on the type of extreme exercise. I know some football types (American football) and they are pretty much beat up, knees, hips replaced, constant surgeries, now cannot enjoy their golden years because of their beat up bodies. Others with similar stories from wrestling or boxing. I don't know if they will live a long time, but one of them cannot even travel because of his pain. When your joints go, they are gone. Every kind of exercise is NOT good for you.
__________________
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,
Life is but a dream.
CaliforniaMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 06:51 PM   #71
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 406
Whenever I read these kinds of suggestions for what you need in a ride I always look at the riders that are serious riders but are still overweight then I'm not as surprised. Unless you are riding at a race pace I doubt you really need that much. It is likely somewhat dependent on the individual but that much food/calories seems pretty excessive for me. I don't care to race and it's not important for me to be the fastest guy out there. And just for the record (in case someone thinks I only ride short rides) I ride a 40+mile ride typically once a week and 50+ generally every other week and I'm 56. My pace is not race pace as I do not ride with others but is reasonable I think for my age
__________________
If money is the root of all evil I want to be a bad man
nuke_diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 08:35 AM   #72
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,982
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuke_diver View Post
Whenever I read these kinds of suggestions for what you need in a ride I always look at the riders that are serious riders but are still overweight then I'm not as surprised. Unless you are riding at a race pace I doubt you really need that much. It is likely somewhat dependent on the individual but that much food/calories seems pretty excessive for me. I don't care to race and it's not important for me to be the fastest guy out there. And just for the record (in case someone thinks I only ride short rides) I ride a 40+mile ride typically once a week and 50+ generally every other week and I'm 56. My pace is not race pace as I do not ride with others but is reasonable I think for my age
Aside from pace, wouldn't it also depend on the terrain one rides on. You can certainly expend a lot of energy on very hilly rides, I would think.
__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 03:09 PM   #73
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 63
Seems easier to keep weight and fat off by eating a sensible diet. Aren't calorie restricted diets supposed to increase longevity? Fewer calories going in means fewer to burn off. The only biking I like is mountain biking. I feel like I get a better overall work out in less distance and time. Plus it's more fun to be out in the woods instead of on the road. Better work out for your core. My doctor says he's seen bone deterioration in patients who cycle a lot. It's due to the nonweight-bearing aspects of the activity. That's why astronauts lose bone density in space.
__________________
Marketwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 05:37 PM   #74
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
Aside from pace, wouldn't it also depend on the terrain one rides on. You can certainly expend a lot of energy on very hilly rides, I would think.
I think they do, but I do ride in a very hilly place and doing a ride with 10,000' of climbing is easily doable (I don't but that's another matter). I'm not suggesting that you don't need calories to ride and riding long distances do burn a lot. But the suggestion that you must have xxx calories every yyy min is not for most casual riders but for racers and extreme riders IMO. If you want to lose weight you don't replace all the calories you burn during the ride. Again it will also depend on the individual. A 40 mile ride for me with 2000' of climbing requires no additional fuel and only sufficient water. I'm fine after and will go for a 2 mile walk in the evening afterward with the dog (and there is a dog walk b4 the ride too). That might not work for someone else

Quote:
My doctor says he's seen bone deterioration in patients who cycle a lot. It's due to the nonweight-bearing aspects of the activity. That's why astronauts lose bone density in space.
. This surprises me. There is weight bearing while you ride...and significant if you are climbing a cat 2 hill in fact. It's not as much as running but running isn't necessarily good for you. Especially if you have bad knees like me. My surgeon said just the opposite in fact, that my bone density was very good and the fact that I don't/can't run has certainly delayed a knee replacement and may have delayed it permanently. Riding a bike is not at all like being in space. What serious cyclists (think TdF) have is generally a lack of upper body strength since they don't need a lot for their sport
__________________
If money is the root of all evil I want to be a bad man
nuke_diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 05:56 PM   #75
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 63
There is a lot of information on road cycling and loss of bone density on the Internet. If you're cycling, you need to balance it with weight training. Google and you'll find tons of information.
__________________
Marketwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 06:42 PM   #76
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 406
I did look. Pretty much ever study was about pro level cyclists not recreational ones. If you are pro level it may well be true since you probably spend hours/day on a bike. If you are recreational you likely also do other things like walking the dog etc

Quote:
...Even more encouraging, most recreational cyclists probably don’t need to worry too much about their bones. “The studies to date have looked primarily at racers,” Smathers says. “That’s a very specialized demographic. These guys train for hours at a very high intensity. They sweat a lot. They never go for runs. They don’t usually do much weight-lifting,” to avoid adding bulk. “They’re strange.” He knows. “For competitive riders, I’d recommend spending some time weight-training.” If you do race or train hard and often on a bike, consider a bone scan, he says. “It’s good to know your status.” For himself, his racing career ended with hip surgery and four metal pins in the joint after his second severe crash. “I do miss racing,” he says. On the plus side, his latest bone scan, completed just weeks ago, shows that his bone density, while still low, is increasing.
I don't run either but I haven't run for decades as my knees are far too bad to run without a great deal of discomfort. So for cardio I have to do low impact. As I said above the real serious cyclists wouldn't dream of going to the gym to weight lift...they might end up with more upper body weight and be slower climbers ...hey if they worry about tires that are 100 grams more than their current ones they sure as hell don't want to put on 10lbs of muscles that don't drive the bike faster
__________________

__________________
If money is the root of all evil I want to be a bad man
nuke_diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why does this make me feel old? kzodave Hi, I am... 14 04-05-2015 04:15 PM
Low Interest Rates Make It A Tough Time to Retire Midpack FIRE and Money 11 09-24-2014 07:57 AM
For those who exercise. Setting exercise goals in ER ? Koogie Health and Early Retirement 31 05-23-2012 08:21 AM
Does Investing in Younger Relatives Pay? pasttense FIRE and Money 20 12-22-2009 02:18 PM
Why exercise won't make you lose weight Alan Health and Early Retirement 103 10-15-2009 11:32 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:58 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.