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Old 01-16-2013, 04:02 PM   #21
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I agree that weight training does get your heart rate up, especially if you go from one set or exercise to another with little recuperation time in between. When I initially started lifting I used to do a full body circuit, but now am doing straight sets of one exercise before moving to the next one. I suspect the circuit training does provide a little more aerobic benefit.

Right now, for my aerobic, I am really getting into pushing a prowler sled and also hitting a heavy bag. If you get a chance give the the prowler sled a try, I promise it will get your heart rate up there.
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Old 01-16-2013, 04:13 PM   #22
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I guess browsed is the correct term, as your comment made me wonder if you absorbed anything or whether I am nut job for posting something of no value to the forum.
...
Nope you are quite right to post this article. And you are probably saner then me . Please forget my too generalized comment above on the article content.
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Old 01-16-2013, 07:14 PM   #23
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He (and researchers) are talking about jogging and running as aerobic exercise. There is just no way around the fact that running increases oxidative stress and has negative side effects. If you like to run, do it; just be aware that it isn't all roses as far as your body is concerned.
Agreed. Chronic cardio training (which has been defined as long stretches at a sustained heart rate in the 80+% range) is just not something the human body is adapted to endure. I personally think we are better off trying to emulate the types of activities that our ancestors engaged in on a regular basis, to maintain health and fitness. Mark Sisson talks about this at the link below:
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:40 PM   #24
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Selective "research" mixed with personal opinion.

Here's brief synopsis of benefits of proper aerobic exercise from a much more reputable source:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/aer...SECTIONGROUP=2
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Old 01-16-2013, 11:39 PM   #25
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Agreed. Chronic cardio training (which has been defined as long stretches at a sustained heart rate in the 80+% range) is just not something the human body is adapted to endure. I personally think we are better off trying to emulate the types of activities that our ancestors engaged in on a regular basis, to maintain health and fitness.
I don't know about this. See the nature article Endurance running and the evolution of Homo:

http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/krigba...004_nature.pdf

and

Persistence hunting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:51 AM   #26
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OK, here's another look at what "chronic cardio" workouts may do to the heart over time, by Dr. Kurt Harris:

Archevore - Archevore Blog -
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:43 AM   #27
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Selective "research" mixed with personal opinion.

Here's brief synopsis of benefits of proper aerobic exercise from a much more reputable source:

Aerobic exercise: Top 10 reasons to get physical - MayoClinic.com
Your source seems to be targeting sedentary people. For example, their goal: "Soon, you could be walking briskly for at least 30 minutes a day — and reaping all the benefits of regular aerobic activity." Walking briskly is not what this thread is about.

FWIW, I agree that Mayo Clinic journalists and Charles Poliquin are in completely different leagues.
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:20 AM   #28
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Interesting article. I've been taking a look at some of the effects of running specifically, and how it is harmful to the spine especially, but also damages knees over time as well.
I was career Navy (as I assume you are from your screen name.) I ran all those years as it was a comfortable part of the Navy culture to fall into. I also ran for a number of years after retiring. But I was a relatively moderate runner - normally ran 30 - 45 minutes at a clip, didn't do a lot of races and then mainly 5Ks. The longest races I ever ran were 10 milers and only did them 3 - 4 times. A lot of my Navy buddies were really big into marathons (Marine Corps, Shamrock, etc.) and ran a lot of them. For the most part, none of them that I keep in touch with are still running due to knee and hip issues. I gave up running about a year and half ago at age 65 not because I had to but because I no longer enjoyed it. I submit that a more moderate approach to running over the years kept me running longer than my buddies.

I now get my aerobics from walking/hiking, spinning, rowing with a Concept 2 rower and doing the elliptical. I agree with those who say that a balance between aerobic, strength/resistance and flexibility is the key. I've never really enjoyed weight lifting, so it's an effort for me to do that and I often backslide and go for long periods without doing strength. But I'm very consistent about aerobics and at least the elliptical and rower give me a little upper body work when I'm off the weights.

Spinning, by the way, is something I've only been doing for about 4 months now and I'm really hooked on it. A great butt-kicking workout. The music helps keep me motivated and the bonus is that except for a few old fart guys like me, most of the class consists of attractive, trim women.
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Old 01-23-2013, 12:15 PM   #29
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I've never been much of a runner. And now at 66 the left knee (ski injury) really prevents it. Hard to walk for any distance either. But in early December I started weight training again. Last time I did that was college. But I began to feel stress and strain when I did something moderately stressful. Anyway, I've been very pleased with the progress I've made in a short period of time. I do cycle through different equipment rapidly and have noticed the aerobic effect. But I have to admit how much I hate doing it. My goal is to get in and get out three times per week. I hope I can keep it up mentally because I've already seen a tremendous improvement in muscle tone and ability to get up stairs.
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Old 01-24-2013, 07:38 AM   #30
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I've never been much of a runner. And now at 66 the left knee (ski injury) really prevents it. Hard to walk for any distance either. But in early December I started weight training again. Last time I did that was college. But I began to feel stress and strain when I did something moderately stressful. Anyway, I've been very pleased with the progress I've made in a short period of time. I do cycle through different equipment rapidly and have noticed the aerobic effect. But I have to admit how much I hate doing it. My goal is to get in and get out three times per week. I hope I can keep it up mentally because I've already seen a tremendous improvement in muscle tone and ability to get up stairs.
When I first started to work out in the gym at age 59, I hated it too. But I persevered and stayed with it, and you know what, I grew to love it and feel lost when I miss a workout.

Keep it going!!!
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Old 01-24-2013, 02:12 PM   #31
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Thought this cartoon was funny with a RE tie. And a little iphone humor as well.





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Old 01-24-2013, 11:18 PM   #32
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Mmm!
"Aerobic exercise.... chronically raises cortisol........results in persistent inflammation - weird combination of claims since cortisol is a potent inhibitor of inflammation.

An article in - Inflammation 2012, December 19 says "
(Abstract). Physical activity has been shown to lower levels of inflammatory markers. However, results are inconsistent, indicating different modes of exercise may have different effects on inflammatory cytokines. We aimed to investigate the effects of 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, or combination exercise on TNF-α and IL-6 compared to no exercise in overweight and obese individuals. TNF-α levels were significantly decreased at week 12 compared to baseline by 20.8 % in the Aerobic group (p = 0.011), 26.9 % in the Resistance group (p = 0.0001), and 32.6 % in the Combination group (p = 0.003). Levels of TNF-α were significantly lower in the Combination compared to the Control group after 12 weeks of exercise training (-22.6 %, p = 0.025) when adjusting for baseline levels. Twelve weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, but mainly combination exercise training decreased TNF-α in overweight and obese individuals compared to no exercise. "

Ergo, combination exercise is the best and aerobic exercise reduces inflammation.

He seems to write from his particular field of expertise and all the athletes on his list seem to be those who would benefit from explosive type power, no middle or long distance runners there.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:08 AM   #33
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Mmm!
"Aerobic exercise.... chronically raises cortisol........results in persistent inflammation - weird combination of claims since cortisol is a potent inhibitor of inflammation.

An article in - Inflammation 2012, December 19 says "
(Abstract). Physical activity has been shown to lower levels of inflammatory markers. However, results are inconsistent, indicating different modes of exercise may have different effects on inflammatory cytokines. We aimed to investigate the effects of 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, or combination exercise on TNF-α and IL-6 compared to no exercise in overweight and obese individuals. TNF-α levels were significantly decreased at week 12 compared to baseline by 20.8 % in the Aerobic group (p = 0.011), 26.9 % in the Resistance group (p = 0.0001), and 32.6 % in the Combination group (p = 0.003). Levels of TNF-α were significantly lower in the Combination compared to the Control group after 12 weeks of exercise training (-22.6 %, p = 0.025) when adjusting for baseline levels. Twelve weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, but mainly combination exercise training decreased TNF-α in overweight and obese individuals compared to no exercise. "

Ergo, combination exercise is the best and aerobic exercise reduces inflammation.

He seems to write from his particular field of expertise and all the athletes on his list seem to be those who would benefit from explosive type power, no middle or long distance runners there.
I think your conclusion is not quite correct. I would say combination exercise is the best, and aerobic exercise reduces inflammation vs those who are sedentary, but long term aerobic exercise by itself may result in health problems.
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